Justin Frosini

Justin Frosini, PhD

Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law
International Law and Organizations
International Development
International Relations

SAIS Europe

Expertise

Regions
  • Balkans
  • Eastern Europe
  • Ghana
  • Italy
  • Northern Africa
  • United Kingdom
  • Western Europe
Topics
  • International Law
  • Rule of Law
  • Nation-building and Democratization
Languages
  • French
  • Italian

Background and Education

Director of the Center for Constitutional Studies and Democratic Development; Assistant Professor of Public Law at the Luigi Bocconi University. Prof. Frosini's fields of interest are comparative constitutional law, democratic development, constitutional adjudication, devolution and federalism. With specific regard to the Western Balkans, between 2000 and 2004, Frosini was involved in several projects sponsored by the European Union to provide on-line training for judges in Albania, BiH, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. He is co-director of the Summer School European Union and Legal Reform, Igalo, Montenegro. Prior to beginning his academic career, Frosini was an active politician at a local level, and in 2007 he was elected to the Constituent Assembly of Democratic Party of Emilia-Romagna. Frosini is also a member of the scientific committee of the Istituto De Gasperi; member of the scientific board of Istituzioni del Federalismo; member of the editorial board of Diritto pubblico comparato ed europeo and Quaderni costituzionali, Cronache dallestero. PhD, constitutional law, University of Bologna.

Publications: Author of a book on the legal value of constitutional preambles as well as several articles and book chapters in English, Italian and Spanish in the field of comparative constitutional law with particular attention for federalism, regionalism and devolution, constitutional justice and forms of government.


Download Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

2015-04-13 00:00:00 
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Fall 2017 
This course use...
This course uses case studies to examine the causes of political change in consolidated democracies. The cases it looks at in detail are: Great Britain, 1964–1979 and Italy, 1979–1994. Why these two cases? Britain was a by-word for political stability in the 1950s. Yet by the mid–1970s it was regarded as the 'sick man of Europe.' The Heath government fought the 1974 elections on the theme of 'who governs Britain' (the voters decided it was not the government); Britain was forced to have recourse to the IMF in 1976; Mrs. Thatcher was elected to office in May 1979 with a specific mandate to stop the decline. The country, in short, had gone from being a paragon of stability to a pioneer of radical political change in the space of a decade, or little more. Italy, by contrast, was reputed to be the most unstable West European country. In fact, in the 1980s, political commentators noted that it was a very stable instability. The country's much-maligned democracy had, in fact, delivered the economic goods and turned Italy into a highly successful economy and society. The country naturally proceeded to collapse. Between 1989 and 1994 Italy experienced, IV Republic France apart, the worst crisis of any post-war European democracy.

The thesis of this course is that by looking at these two empirical cases one can develop a tentative method for the political analysis of advanced democracies. We are going to ask 'why did Britain (Italy) become politically unstable?' This question cannot be reduced to a few simple variables in a rigid formula. It can only be answered by reconstructing (simulating) the events and trying to figure out what was important and what was not. Our point is, however, that it is possible to generalize from these experiences to other cases. Analysts should look at the constitutional frameworks, the expected and unexpected consequences of legislation, the moods of public opinion, the solidity of the public finances, the perception of social justice, the personal qualities of political leaders, the ambitions and self-image of the political class, the changing character of the population and so on. We should, in short, multiply variables, not reduce them, if we want to understand the direction that particular societies are taking. If we want to gauge political risk — and gauge is a much better word than calculate since it implies using or judgment rather than some mechanical formula — there is no alternative to simulating complexity.
Spring 2018 
One just has to...
One just has to think of the 'Arab Spring' and its aftermath or the events in the Ukraine to realise that there have been some dramatic constitutional developments and legal reforms in recent years. The spread of human rights and constitutional, representative government based on the rule of law, as either spurs for development or desirable outcomes of development, seems both possible and urgently necessary. This course consequently examines the nature, fate and prospects for constitutional development and democratisation across the globe. Employing both the diachronic and synchronic methods of analysis typical of comparative constitutional law, the course addresses topics such as constitution-making and constitutional amendment; forms of state and forms of government as well as the role and functions of electoral management bodies and constitutional and supreme courts with the aim of understanding how a given institutional framework may facilitate or obstruct transitions to democracy. The experience of so-called 'consolidated' democracies will often be used to examine the transition to democracy of other countries. The case studies are drawn from different parts of the world, but with particular emphasis on Europe and North Africa. (Crossed listed International Relations/International Development) (IL)
March 14, 2017 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, is interviewed on RAI Radio 1 about "Brexit (in Italian)."

November 28, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, spoke at Università Bocconi in a conference entitled "Brexit: rischi e opportunità (in Italian)."

June 28, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, will participate in a conference at Nomisma entitled "Brexit – What comes next? (in Italian)."

June 24, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, features in a video from Università Bocconi commenting about "Brexit: will the EU or the UK dissolve first?."

June 21, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, features in a video from Università Bocconi commenting about "Brexit: A referendum that is worth two."

May 16, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, will present at Birkbeck University on "Brexit: Should the UK leave the EU?."

May 10, 2016 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, wrote a commentary on via Sarfatti 25 entitled "Brexit: tra politica e tecnica si consuma l'idea di Europa unita (in Italian)."

September 29, 2015 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, features in a video from Università Bocconi commenting about "Catalonia e Scozia, problemi politici e costituzionali (in Italian)."

May 8, 2015 
Justin Frosini,...

Justin Frosini, Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, was interviewed by Sky TG24 about the "Elezioni, Cameron riconquista la Gran Bretagna."