Certificate and Non-Degree Programs

Non-Degree Enrollment
Certificates
Individual Courses
Summer Programs
Online Principle of Economics
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Non-Degree Enrollment

Johns Hopkins SAIS welcomes non-degree students to enroll in courses during the fall, spring and summer terms alongside degree students. Non-degree students are eligible to take courses in all areas of study at the school, as well as specialized language study emphasizing political, economic and international topics.

Courses can be used towards a graduate certificate, transferred to a degree record upon matriculation, or taken for personal or professional development. Non-degree students may take a maximum of two courses per semester and a maximum of four courses overall for credit or audit.

  • Certificates
    Complete a series of four courses and earn a graduate certificate designed to serve as an important credential for students and professionals seeking to expand on a chosen area of interest without having to pursue a full master’s degree.
  • Individual Courses
    Enroll in courses throughout the year in one of our 20 academic programs or 17 language departments.
  • Summer Programs
    Complete one to two courses in just six weeks. Courses are held in the evening to cater to working professionals and offered by our economics, policy, regional studies and language programs.
  • Online Principles of Economics
    Complete the Johns Hopkins SAIS MA economics admissions requirement and the prerequisite to take intermediate Microeconomics and/or Macroeconomics courses at the school by enrolling in our 12-week fully online course.

Non-Degree Enrollment Options Delivery Mode Duration Fall Spring Summer
Certificates DC Campus 4 courses X X X
Individual Courses DC Campus 1-4 courses X X X
Summer Programs DC Campus 6 weeks X
Online Principles of Economics Online 12 weeks X X
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Certificates

Johns Hopkins SAIS offers three graduate certificates for students and professionals seeking to gain academic credentials without pursuing a full degree:

  • Certificate in International Studies
  • Certificate in International Development
  • Certificate in International Economics

Each certificate requires a series of four graduate-level courses.  Students can earn a certificate in as few as two terms by working at a rigorous pace or can opt to complete it over an extended period of time across several terms. Courses may be taken during the fall, spring and summer terms.

CertificateRequirements
International Development
  • Comparative Politics
  • Introduction to Economic Development
  • 2 electives offered within the International Development curriculum
International Economics
  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • International Trade Theory
  • International Monetary Theory
International Studies
  • Theories of International Relations
  • 3 electives from any area of study in the course catalog (excluding Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and language courses)

The Certificate in International Development incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to the study of developing countries. It offers an opportunity to conceptualize development problems through social, political, economic and environmental aspects of development. This certificate is offered to non-degree students who successfully complete a series of four courses within the International Development curriculum.
 
Recommended for:
Students interested in human and economic development, social change, health care and education reform, infrastructure, and environment. 
 
Course Requirements:
  • Comparative Politics
  • Introduction to Economic Development
  • Elective offered by or cross-listed with the International Development program
  • Elective offered by or cross-listed with the International Development program
 
Sample Curriculum from Past Students:
  • Gender Inequality and Development
  • From Poverty to Plenty: Policymaking for Global Progress
  • Comparative Politics
  • Introduction to Economic Development
  • Financial Inclusion
  • International Political Economy of Emerging Markets
  • Comparative Politics
  • Introduction to Economic Development
  • Agriculture- Global Issues*
  • The Politics of Water in Developing Countries
  • Comparative Agriculture Policy
  • Introduction to Economic Development
*Waived out of Comparative Politics
 
View the course search  to see the schedule of courses.
 
Waiver Exams
If a student has completed any of the required courses from an accredited institution and received a grade of B- or better, he/she may take a waiver exam and then select an alternate course from the broader international development curriculum at the school. 
The Certificate in International Economics allows students to research the flow of capital, labor, investment and trade among nations, while obtaining the qualitative and quantitative skills necessary for economic forecasting. This certificate is offered to non-degree students who successfully complete a series of four courses within the International Economics curriculum.

Recommended for:
Students interested in financial analytics, economic consulting, international trade, and market research.
 
Course Requirements:
  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • International Trade Theory
  • International Monetary Theory
  
Waiver Exams
If a student has completed any of the required four courses from an accredited institution and received a grade of B- or better, he/she may take a waiver exam and then select an alternate course from the broader economics curriculum at the school. Sample courses from past students include: Behavioral Economics, Corporate Finance, Game Theory, and Risk Analysis & Modeling. View the course search to see the full schedule of courses.
 
Pre-requisites
In order to complete this certificate, students must have previously taken Principles of Microeconomics and Principles of Macroeconomics with a grade of B- or better. Students may also complete the Online Principles of Economics course offered by the school in order to fulfill this requirement.
The Certificate in International Studies offers a broad overview of international relations and allows for a concentration in a series of related courses for those students wishing to specialize. It also offers general training for those wishing to achieve a wider appreciation for international politics. The certificate is offered to non-degree students who successfully complete a series of four courses taken from any of the non-language academic programs.

Recommended for:
Students interested in international relations, foreign policy, conflict resolution, human rights, global business strategy, or regional studies.

Course Requirements:
  • Theories of International Relations course
  • 3 electives from any area of study in the course catalog (excluding Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and language courses)

Sample Curriculum from Past Students:
  • Terror as Political Opposition
  • The War on Terror
  • Islam and American Foreign Policy
  • Theories of International Relations
  • Introduction to International Law
  • Multilateral Negotiations
  • Current Asian Security Issues
  • Theories of International Relations
  • Energy Poverty
  • Introduction to Climate Change and Economic Development
  • International Wildlife Conservation
  • Theories of International Relations
 
 
View the course search to see the schedule of courses.

Waiver Exams
If a student has completed the required International Relations course from an accredited institution and received a grade of B- or better, he/she may take a waiver exam and then select an alternate course from the broader curriculum at the school. 
Certificate students who are US citizens or eligible noncitizens may receive Federal Student Aid. Students will need to apply for the FAFSA and meet the following criteria:

Students must have an enrollment status of at least "Half-time" in order to qualify for financial aid. 
  • For fall & spring terms this equals 8 credits (generally the equivalent of 2 classes)
  • For summer term this equals 4 credits (generally the equivalent of 1 class)
Student Clubs - Enrolled certificate students are eligible to join student clubs.
 
Campus Events - Certificate and non-degree students are welcome to attend campus events in order to grow their network with other Johns Hopkins SAIS students and alumni.

Online Job Search - Johns Hopkins SAIS certificate students have access to the Johns Hopkins University online job search portal for every term that they are an active student.  The online portal helps connect students to rewarding career opportunities whether they’re looking for a career change or their next promotion. Through the portal, certificate and degree students can apply for jobs and internships, access online career resources, and sign up for select campus events.

Learn more about certificate students by visiting the school’s student profile snapshot blog.

Gainful Employment Disclosures for Certificate in International Studies, Development and Economics.

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Individual Courses

Non-degree students can apply and enroll in courses in the fall and spring or summer term in any of the school's areas of study. Courses can be used towards a graduate certificate, transferred to a degree record upon matriculation or taken for personal or professional development.

TermApplication Deadlines
Summer Term 2019Class Period: June 3 - July 16
Application Deadline: May 10
Fall Semester 2019Class Period: September 3 - December 9
Application Deadline: August 25
Spring Semester 2020Class Period: January 27 - May 2
Application Deadline: January 20

Non-degree students may take a maximum of two courses per semester and a maximum of four courses overall for credit or audit.
 
Sample list of courses:
  • Chinese Foreign Policy
  • Comparative Political Economy
  • Comparative Public Management
  • Economics of Immigration
  • European Security
  • Global Health Policy
  • Institutional Crises in Emerging Markets: The Case of Argentina
  • International Dispute Settlement Methods
  • International Environmental Law: Crisis and Cooperation
  • Middle East Media Wars
  • Net Assessment
  • Political Economy of African Development
  • Social Entrepreneurship: Driving Innovation in Development
  • The Geopolitics of Energy
  • Theories & Methods of Qualitative Political Research
View the course search to see the schedule of courses.
Term2 Credit or Language Course4 Credit Course
Fall/Spring$3,269$6,538
Summer $2,900$4,050
 
Financial Aid
Financial Aid is only available to certificate students. US citizens or eligible noncitizens may receive Federal Student Aid. Students will need to apply for the FAFSA and meet the following criteria:
Certificate students must have an enrollment status of at least "Half-time" in order to qualify for financial aid. 
  • For fall & spring terms this equals 8 credits (generally the equivalent of 2 classes).
  • For summer term this equals 4 credits (generally the equivalent of 1 class).
Alumni Discount
Johns Hopkins SAIS degree-program alumni and those who have completed either the SAIS Europe Diploma or Nanjing Certificate are eligible to receive a 50% tuition discount on all fall and spring courses, provided there is space available for their enrollment. Alumni receive a 30% tuition discount on summer courses. Alumni may not transfer credits from courses taken on a non-degree basis with this discount to an additional Johns Hopkins SAIS degree program.

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Summer Programs

Summer courses feature international relations courses from our economics, policy, and regional studies programs. Students also have the opportunity to study Arabic, Chinese, or Russian through an international lens at the Summer Language Institute. All classes are held during convenient evening hours to accommodate students with internships and full-time jobs and can be used towards a certificate, transferred to a degree record upon matriculation or taken for personal or professional development.

Summer Programs 2019: June 3-July 16

Read course descriptions for the 2019 non-language summer courses. Descriptions will be added as more courses are confirmed.
 
American Foreign Policy Since WW II: John Karaagac, Core
SA.100.720 T/R 6pm-9pm
Covering the history of US foreign relations since 1945, the course emphasizes competing traditions of statecraft, successive administrations and applications from International Relations Theory to American Foreign Policy. After considering the Cold War era, the course will examine future challenges facing American policy-makers and citizens alike.
 
China as an Emerging Superpower: Michael Chase, China Studies
SA.750.746  M/W 6pm-9pm
Fueled by decades of extraordinary economic growth, China has transformed itself into a major power on the world stage. Along with its growing economic power, China has been expanding its diplomatic influence and strengthening its scientific and technological and military capabilities. Even as China increases its power and influence, however, it faces daunting challenges, both at home and abroad. This course considers China as an emerging superpower, with a focus on various domestic and international aspects of China's rise.
 
Comparative Politics: Allison Berland, Core
SA.100.750 T/R 6pm-9pm
Focusing on the major institutions of democratic political systems, such as electoral systems, presidentialism, federalism, and judicial and legal systems, the course aims to familiarize students with a diversity of frameworks to understand contemporary politics within countries. The course will draw upon real world cases to highlight functional issues such as democratic transitions, governance and corruption, and the relationship between development and democracy.
 
Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Development.
 
Econometrics: John Harrington, International Economics
SA.340.710 T/R 6pm-9pm
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to econometrics. Develops tools for estimating functional relationships and critically reading empirical studies that use different econometric techniques; presents assumptions of multivariate regression and discusses the most common econometric problems and the potential consequences and remedies; and discusses omitted variables, sample selection, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, multicollinearity and use of discrete variables. Introduces students to instrumental variable technique. Uses statistical software in applied exercises.
 
Prerequisite: Statistical Methods for Business and Economics.
 
From Poverty to Plenty: Policymaking for Global Progress: Charles Kenny, International Development
SA.400.783 T/R 6pm-9pm
Students will gain a greater understanding of global change over the past fifty years in areas including income and wealth, health and education, norms and rights, war and violence, economic interconnection, resources and the environment. Using a case study approach, the class will ask what these changes imply for particular foreign policy and international organizations including the World Bank and IMF, The World Health Organization, the UN Security Council and Peacekeeping, USAID and the US Department of Defense. Students will focus their own coursework on one or two specific institutions working in development, trade, defense, migration or diplomacy. They will craft short policy memos and a longer policy presentation designed to improve strategy, policy or practice at the institution(s) they select to take account of recent global change.
 
Illicit Finance: Adam Szubin, Strategic Studies
SA.660.710  T/R 6pm-9pm
This course will examine the methodologies used by criminals and terrorists to raise and move money, the tools that governments use to track and stop them, and the latest developments in the field. Students will look at how illicit finance campaigns are being fought in the areas of terrorism, organized crime, human rights violations, and cyber-crime. The course will cover both the systemic/structural (e.g. governments enhancing global anti-money laundering) and targeted/tactical levels of the fight (e.g. law enforcement tracking financial flows to unravel plots). Students will learn not just what is being done but how to critically assess tools and policy efforts in the field. 
 
International Financial Markets: Elie Canetti, International Economics
SA.380.722  M/W 6pm-9pm
Students will gain an understanding of how and why governments, corporations and financial institutions raise funds in financial markets—debt and equity—domestically and internationally. Themes include how financial markets differ from other markets from a public policy and regulatory perspective; innovations in capital-raising techniques; and the changing pattern of risk in financial markets resulting from globalization. The course will address key factors that distinguish financial markets and institutions in OECD nations from those in developing countries.
 
International Monetary Theory: Andrew Rys, International Economics
SA.300.708  M/W 6pm-9pm
Students will learn the basic theory underlying the international monetary system. Topics include understanding a country’s balance of payments, exchange rate markets, the role of expectations, monetary policy in open economies, the role of interest rates and capital flows, international financial markets, and macroeconomic fiscal policies in an open economy context.
 
Prerequisite: SAIS Macroeconomics, or intermediate macroeconomics from another institution and passing the SAIS Macroeconomics online waiver exam. Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Economics.
 
International Political Economy of Emerging Markets: David Steinberg, International Political Economy
SA.610.700  M/W 6pm-9pm
Students will study the relationship between politics and international economics in developing countries, with a focus on the emerging market economies. The course will critically evaluate different political science theories of foreign economic policymaking in emerging markets and focus on developing countries’ embrace of economic globalization over the past thirty years. The course will explore the different political reasons for why emerging market and developing countries have liberalized foreign trade, removed barriers to foreign investment, and reduced the state’s role in the domestic economy since the 1980s.
 
International Trade Theory: David G. Landry, International Economics
SA.300.707  T/R 6pm-9pm
This course covers the theory and practice of international trade and investment. The first part of the course examines the cause of trade, the sources of the gains from trade and the domestic and international distribution of those gains. The second part examines the instruments and consequences of trade policy measures, especially tariffs and quantitative restrictions. Addresses preferential trade agreements and the practice of trade policy.
 
Prerequisite: SAIS Microeconomics, or intermediate microeconomics from another institution and passing the SAIS Microeconomics online waiver exam. Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Economics.
 
Introduction to Economic Development: TBD, International Economics
SA.320.724  M/W 6pm-9pm
The course focuses on the key concepts and ideas surrounding economic development. Students will learn about the global patterns of economic development from the mid-19th century to today. They will also learn about key economic development concepts and measurements, and the waves of theoretical thinking in the development economics discipline since the mid-20th century. Finally, the course will explore the development experience of several countries, with an emphasis on the role of economic policy.
The course is appropriate for students without prior course work in development. Prior course work in principles of economics is desirable, or additional self-study may be needed.
 
Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Development.
 
Macroeconomics: Marta Giagheddu, International Economics
SA.300.701  M/W 6pm-9pm
Macroeconomics is an intermediate-level course that studies the theoretical and institutional framework of modern national economies. Develops analytic tools used to understand how the economy functions in the aggregate. Focuses on the primary purpose of those tools to explain national levels of income, employment, prices and interest rates, as well as changes in these variables over time. Devotes equal attention to short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic phenomena, especially economic growth and development. Assesses the role of fiscal and monetary policy in determining economic outcomes in both closed and open economies as well as the important relationship between financial markets and macroeconomics.
 
Prerequisite: Principles of Macroeconomics or equivalent. Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Economics.
 
Microeconomics: Stephen Tokarick, International Economics
SA.300.700  T/R 6pm-9pm
Microeconomics is an intermediate-level course that focuses on the theory of decision-making under conditions of scarcity. Analyzes consumer theory, choice and demand, production, cost, the firm, market structures and market failure. Emphasizes economic efficiency and the application of economic theory to government and firm decisions and public policy problems. Introduces game theory and some differential calculus. Prior knowledge of differential calculus is helpful or additional self-study may be needed.
 
Prerequisites: Principles of microeconomics or equivalent, high school algebra and facility with graphs. Required for those pursuing a Certificate in International Economics.
 
Politics & Risk: Countries, Policies, and Institutions: Seth Kaplan, Global Theory & History
SA.600.740  M/W 6pm-9pm
Politics affects risk on many levels (e.g., international, national, regional, and local) and is the result of the interaction of many different elements. Students will examine basic issues with regard to risk analysis as well as why forecasts often fall short before examining three broad issues: country structural fragility, problems with collective action policymaking, and operational breakdowns. The class focuses more on the risks that face countries than on how particular risks might impact corporations or NGOs, though the latter is also examined. The course will also examine how to prioritize and mitigate risk. Each class aims to provide students with a set of frameworks to think about and assess these issues and to work on case studies to develop their skills.
 
Politics of North American Economic Integration: Christopher Sands, International Political Economy
SA.610.705 T/R 6pm-9pm
As the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) after 25 years demonstrated, economic linkages in North America continue to be contested politically at the national and subnational level. The proposed update, the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, would recommit to deepening continental economic integration while retaining the NAFTA model’s governance structure: sovereign governments negotiate regulatory and border security cooperation on an ongoing basis and conduct investment, intellectual property, and monetary policy independently. Students in this course will explore the governance of economic flows among the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The course will evaluate how important sectors have adapted supply chains and market strategies in response to regional economic integration and how economic partners outside North America—like China, the European Union, and Japan—operate in the North American market.
 
Russia Behind the Headlines: Marsha Olive, European and Eurasian Studies
SA.710.726 T/R 6pm-9pm
Far from expectations of partnership after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Russia looms large in today’s international security debates as a nuclear-armed opponent of the US-led world order. The course looks behind the headlines to examine why Russia became a revisionist power that poses a greater challenge to the West than at any time since the mid-1980s. It equips students to understand the domestic dynamics behind Russia’s strategic posture and to formulate approaches for dealing with Russia in the Putin and post-Putin era.
 
States, Revolutionaries & Terrorism: Camille Pecastaing, Middle East Studies
SA.860.781 M/W 6pm-9pm
Students will study the evolution of terrorism as a tool of political expression and conquest of power. Surveys doctrines and actions of anarchists, Russian Nihilists, Social Revolutionaries, as well as nationalists and fascist movements. Reviews Leninist and Maoist models of political subversion and their avatars in the national liberation movements and urban guerillas of the 1960s and 1970s. Draws on cases from the Middle East and North Africa, including Irgun, Lehi, EOKA, FLN, Fatah, PFLP, ANO and ASALA.
 
Statistical Methods for Business and Economics: John Harrington, International Economics
SA.340.709 M/W 6pm-9pm
Students will study basic statistical tools for data analysis. Emphasizes facility in problem-solving in statistical inference and two-variable regression and correlation analysis. Presents descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions and their use in hypothesis testing. Uses computer to solve problems and to reinforce statistical concepts.
 
The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation in East Asia: James Person, Asian Studies
SA.755.736  T/R 6pm-9pm
The course is structured around the background, theory, and application of nuclear politics and history in East Asia. Students will learn about the development of nuclear weapons programs during the Second World War and the Cold War and the differences in proliferation and non-proliferation strategies among early proliferators (e.g. the United States and the Soviet Union). In the second portion of the course, students will learn about brinkmanship diplomacy, deterrence theory, and alliance security dilemma, and apply them to the study of cases of proliferation, attempted proliferation, and nuclear latency in China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Japan and Australia to understand the variance in nuclear exploration, pursuit, and acquisition. Incorporating recent policy analysis and declassified archival documents, the course will foster a breadth of knowledge on different nuclear weapons cases.
 
Theories of International Relations: John Karaagac, Core
SA.100.761  M/W 6pm-9pm
This course presents a set of tools for understanding, predicting and formulating policy on international conflict and cooperation. Examining leading schools of international relations theory, including Realism, Liberalism and Constructivism, the course will also survey topics such as alliance formation, nuclear deterrence, imperialism and international institutions. Students will explore the domestic sources of foreign policy, trade, global environmentalism, international law, the integration and disintegration of states, globalization and the future of international relations.

Required for the Certificate in International Studies.
The Summer Language Institute provides task-based language courses emphasizing economic, political, and international topics through role play, simulations and discussion of current events. Courses develop the four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Topic examples may include business conversation, elections, immigration, media, and negotiation strategies.  

Courses are offered at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels 3-4 evenings a week from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. in the following languages:

 Arabic
 Chinese
 Russian
 
Summer Language Institute 2019 Course Schedule
  • Week of June 3 - Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs
  • Week of June 10 - Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs
  • Week of June 17 - Mon, Wed, Thurs
  • Week of June 24 - Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs
  • Week of July 1 - Mon, Tues, Wed
  • Week of July 8 - Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs
  • Week of July 15 - Mon, Tues

Students will be required to take a placement test at the beginning of the course to assess their language competency and will be assigned to a class that fits their ability. 
Application OpenFebruary 2019
Application DeadlineMay 10
Tuition DueMay 15
Late Application Deadline ($35 late fee accessed)May 31
M/W and Language Classes StartJune 3
T/TH Classes StartJune 4
Add/Drop DeadlineJune 7
Deadline to change from credit to auditJune 28
Independence Day - No classes heldJuly 4
Last day to Withdraw without a failing gradeJuly 5
Deadline to change from audit to creditJuly 12
Classes EndJuly 12
Exam WeekJuly 15
Grades DueAugust 2

Summer Course (4-credits): $4,050
Summer Language Course: $2,900

Financial Aid is only available to certificate students. US citizens or eligible noncitizens may receive Federal Student Aid. Students will need to apply for the FAFSA and meet the following criteria:
Students must have an enrollment status of at least "Half-time" in order to qualify for financial aid. 
  • For fall & spring terms this equals 8 credits (generally the equivalent of 2 classes)
  • For summer term this equals 4 credits (generally the equivalent of 1 class)
Refunds 
Tuition is refundable only when the student submits an Add/Drop form to the Office of Summer Programs during the Add/Drop period. Please note that the application fee and 10% deposit on tuition are non-refundable. Refund amounts will be determined by the date and time the form is submitted according to the schedule listed below.
  • Before 2pm on June 10: 90%
  • Between 2pm on June 11 and 2pm on June 12: 50%
  • After 2pm on June 12: No tuition will be refunded
Alumni Discount
Alumni from the school’s degree programs, SAIS Europe Diploma or Hopkins Nanjing Certificate receive a 30% tuition discount on summer courses.
Admissions Decisions
Admission to any of the Summer Programs is entirely independent from degree-program admission and in no way implies acceptance to a Johns Hopkins SAIS degree program. Application to a degree program is a separate and distinct process.
 
Course Cancellations 
For a course to be offered, a minimum of six students must be registered. The school reserves the right to cancel a course that does not meet minimum enrollment requirements. To check the status of canceled courses, please refer to this website. Any tuition charges, including the 10 percent deposit, will be refunded if the school cancels a course.

Grades 
The highest grade given at the school is "A", a grade of "C" or higher is considered passing. A failing grade of "D" cannot be replaced or removed from a student's transcript. A course with a failing grade does not count toward a Johns Hopkins SAIS Certificate. Non-degree students who receive a failing grade are not eligible to take additional course work at the school. A student may choose to appeal this decision to the Office of Summer Programs, and the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs will make the final determination. At that time, the student may be required to pay full tuition and take the course again or may be dismissed from taking any additional courses at the school.
 
Transferring Courses 
Credits for courses taken in the Summer Programs can be transferred to many other graduate schools, including the Johns Hopkins SAIS MA and MIPP programs. Check with individual schools for their transfer credit policies.
 
Economics Pre-Requisites and Waiver Exams 
Students must successfully complete any prerequisites for a course, as described under the course description, prior to the start of the Summer Programs. Successful completion is defined as a minimum grade of "B-." In addition, applicants to International Trade Theory or International Monetary Theory must pass the school's online waiver exam in Microeconomics or Macroeconomics if the prerequisite course was not completed at Johns Hopkins SAIS. These exams can be taken online through coordination with the International Economics Department. Applicants may attempt each exam only once. To register, contact Econwaiver@jhu.edu
Course Schedule
All summer courses may count towards a Johns Hopkins SAIS graduate certificate as denoted below. More courses will be added to the website as they are confirmed.

M/W = Monday & Wednesday classes, T/R = Tuesday & Thursday classes

Course Program Schedule International Development International Economics International Studies
American Foreign Policy Since WW II Core T/R X
China as an Emerging Superpower China Studies M/W X
Comparative Politics Core T/R X X
Econometrics International Economics T/R X X
From Poverty to Plenty: Policymaking for Global Progress International Development T/R X X
Illicit Finance Strategic Studies T/R X
International Financial Markets International Economics M/W X
International Monetary Theory International Economics M/W X X
International Political Economy of Emerging Markets International Political Economy M/W X X
International Trade Theory International Economics T/R X X
Introduction to Economic Development International Economics M/W X X
Macroeconomics International Economics M/W X
Microeconomics International Economics T/R X
Politics & Risk: Countries, Policies, and Institutions Global Theory & History M/W X
Politics of North American Economic Integration International Political Economy T/R X
Russia Behind the Headlines European & Eurasian Studies T/R X
States, Revolutionaries, & Terrorism Middle East Studies M/W X
Statistical Methods for Business and Economics International Economics M/W X X
The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation in East Asia Asian Studies T/R X
Theories of International Relations Core M/W X
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Online Principle of Economics

The Online Principles of Economics (OPE) is a non-credit course that covers introductory micro and macroeconomics and can be used to complete the school's MA economics entrance requirement, or as a prerequisite to take the intermediate Microeconomics and/or Macroeconomics courses at Johns Hopkins SAIS. This 12-week fully online course can be taken from anywhere in the world, provided students have access to a reliable internet connection. Students are required to participate in the online orientation at the start of each course.

Fall 2019 OPE Dates 
Apply by September 9
  • Mandatory Online Orientation: September 12-September 15
  • Online Principles of Economics Course: September 16-December 8

The purpose of Online Principles of Economics is to teach basic, essential economic concepts and expose students to the analytical tools, debates and applications of economics.

The course contains two parts:
  • Part 1 - Microeconomics - contains five modules (Modules 1 to 5)
  • Part 2 - Macroeconomics - also contains five modules (Modules 6 to 10)
Note that each week students will be required to watch lectures, complete a problem set, take a practice quiz and finish a short graded quiz. Once a new module starts, students will not be able to submit the past week’s assignments so they will need to manage their time wisely to keep up with the course deliverables. There are also final exams after modules 5 and 10, as well as a capstone written assignment due at the end of module 10.

Course Methodology
The course is organized into weekly modules with each lecture recorded on a virtual whiteboard.

This course will employ a variety of assessments. First, there are long-answer problem sets meant to test your conceptual understanding of the material, as well as a practice short answer quiz. Second, at the end of each weekly module is a brief graded quiz comprised of multiple choice, short answer, and short-essay questions. Both the Micro and Macro sections of the course conclude with an exam, split into half multiple-choice and half short-essay questions. Finally, there is a short written assignment that functions as a capstone, allowing students to apply their learning to the real world.

A typical week in the Online Principles of Economics course will involve the following:
  • A set of 6-8 video lectures, averaging 10-12 minutes in length
  • Textbook readings selected to support and supplement the lectures
  • Practice on both short-answer quizzes and more substantive conceptual problems
  • A final assessment for each module
  Download Syllabus

OPE is a non-credit course and will not appear on a Johns Hopkins SAIS transcript. In place of a transcript, students will receive a letter of completion on Academic Affairs letterhead verifying their enrollment and final grade in the course. Students who are taking this course in order to meet the entry requirements for a SAIS degree must receive a B- or higher in order to meet that requirement.

Tuition
Cost of tuition for fall, spring or summer OPE course is $1,500. Tuition for this course is non-refundable once orientation begins.

Withdraw
The last day to withdraw from the course without a failing grade will be after the third week of the course. No tuition will be refunded and a grade of W (withdraw) will be recorded for the course.
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How to Apply

Please select the program that you are interested in to access the application and list of required materials.

· Terms open for admission: Fall 2019
Apply

All new and returning students must apply online. Note this excludes current SAIS degree students who should register for summer courses through SIS just like in the normal academic year.
Only first-time applicants who have never been enrolled in a degree program at JHU are required to pay the $50 application fee and upload application materials.

Fall 2019 application deadline: August 28, 2019

Returning Certificate Students: The school has a new application system and all returning students will need to setup a login and password the first time they use it. Please select "First-time users" on the application to setup a profile and then you will be able to select your course(s).

Application Requirements for First-Time Applicants:
  • A copy of your current CV or resume
  • A one-page personal statement describing your background, motivation and goals for pursuing a graduate certificate at Johns Hopkins SAIS.
  • If English is your second language, a copy of your TOEFL iBT score of 100+ or IELTS score of 7+. The TOEFL requirement can be waived if the language of instruction at either your undergraduate or graduate institution was English and was in a country where English is the official language. Contact the Certificate and Non-Degree Programs office for more information: sais.nondegree@jhu.edu
  • Official transcripts from all degree-granting institutions. All applicants for non-language courses must have completed an undergraduate degree or should be entering their final year of undergraduate study in the fall of 2019. Applicants for the Summer Language Institute in DC must have completed a minimum of one year of undergraduate studies prior to the start of the summer term. A 3.0 overall minimum GPA (or "B" average) in previous studies is required. Transcripts must be officially translated if not in English.
    Note: You may apply with your unofficial transcript and we will be able to provide a conditional admissions decision to you; the official transcript must be submitted before the end of the semester that you are enrolled.
· Terms open for admission: Fall 2019
Apply

All new and returning students must apply online. Note this excludes current SAIS degree students who should register for summer courses through SIS just like in the normal academic year.
Only first-time applicants who have never been enrolled in a degree program at JHU are required to pay the $50 application fee and upload application materials.

Fall 2019 application deadline: August 28, 2019

Returning Non-Degree Students: The school has a new application system and all returning students will need to setup a login and password the first time they use it. Please select "First-time users" on the application to setup a profile and then you will be able to select your course(s).

Application Requirements for First-Time Applicants:
  • A copy of your current CV or resume
  • A one-page personal statement describing your background, motivation and goals for pursuing non-degree programs at Johns Hopkins SAIS.
  • If English is your second language, a copy of your TOEFL iBT score of 100+ or IELTS score of 7+. The TOEFL requirement can be waived if the language of instruction at either your undergraduate or graduate institution was English and was in a country where English is the official language. Contact the Certificate and Non-Degree Programs office for more information: sais.nondegree@jhu.edu
  • Official transcripts from all degree-granting institutions. All applicants for non-language courses must have completed an undergraduate degree or should be entering their final year of undergraduate study in the fall of 2019. Applicants for the Summer Language Institute in DC must have completed a minimum of one year of undergraduate studies prior to the start of the summer term. A 3.0 overall minimum GPA (or "B" average) in previous studies is required. Transcripts must be officially translated if not in English.
    Note: You may apply with your unofficial transcript and we will be able to provide a conditional admissions decision to you; the official transcript must be submitted before the end of the semester that you are enrolled.
Terms open for admission: Fall 2019

All students must submit the Online Principles of Economics Application. Registration is handled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Non-degree students may begin applying for the Fall 2019 course on July 1.
Application

The below application requirements are for non-degree students only; admitted SAIS students only need to submit the online application:

  • Attach your current CV or resume to the application.
  • Attach a one-page personal statement describing your background, motivation and goals for taking the course(s) to the application.
  • If English is your second language, email a copy of your TOEFL score of 100+ (IBT) to sais.nondegree@jhu.edu.  This requirement can be waived if the language of instruction at either your undergraduate or graduate institution was English.
  • Attach an unofficial copy of your undergraduate transcript to the application.
Visit Us

Attend an Information Session

Join us on-campus in Washington, DC or online for an information session to learn about Johns Hopkins SAIS Certificate and Non-Degree Programs and the many opportunities for study. 

On-Campus Info Sessions:

  • March 13th at 6 p.m.
  • April 9th at 6 p.m.
  • May 8th at 6 p.m.

Admissions Conference Room, 3rd Floor, 1740 Massachusetts Ave NW Washington, DC 20036
RSVP

Virtual Info Sessions:

  • February 26th at 12:30 p.m.
  • March 26th at 12:30 p.m.
  • April 30th at 12:30 p.m.
  • May 21st at 12:30 p.m.
RSVP

Schedule an Appointment

We also encourage prospective students to setup a 1:1 advising appointment in person, on the phone or via Skype to discuss course selection with regard to your academic and professional goals.
Schedule Appointment

Contact Us

Have a question you'd rather call or email us about?  Contact us directly:

Kirsten Sardi, Director of Continuing Education and Non-Degree Programs
Sarah Cook, Manager of Graduate Programs
Certificate and Non-Degree Programs
1740 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036
202.663.5671
sais.nondegree@jhu.edu 




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