Monica Baumgarten de Bolle

Monica Baumgarten de Bolle, PhD

Practitioner in Residence of International Economics and Emerging Markets
International Development
International Economics

Background and Education

Monica de Bolle, visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics since March 2015, is professor of macroeconomics at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (currently on leave), as well as managing partner of Galanto | MBB Consultants, a macroeconomics advisory firm. Named as "Honored Economist" in 2014 by the Order of Brazilian Economists for her contributions to the Brazilian policy debate, de Bolle focuses on macroeconomics, foreign exchange policy, monetary and fiscal policy, trade and inequality, financial regulation, and capital markets. Previously she was a director of the Institute for Economic Policy Research (IEPE/Casa das Garças), a prestigious think tank based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She was also an economist at the International Monetary Fund.
 
De Bolle has coauthored a number of books on the global economy and Brazil's policy challenges, including The State of the World Economy, Challenges and Responses: Essays in Honor of Pedro S. Malan (2014), The Future of Brazilian Manufacturing: The Deindustrialization Debate (2013), New Dilemmas in Economic Policy (2011), Financial Regulation Reform in the US: New Global Architecture and the Brazilian Regulatory Context (2009), and How to Respond to the Global Financial Crisis? Economic Policies for Brazil (2009).
 
Her views on Brazil's economy and economic policy have been published widely by the international and Brazilian media. She contributes regularly to major Brazilian newspapers O Globo and O Estado de São Paulo.
 
De Bolle obtained her BA in economics from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and holds a PhD in economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science.


2015-10-01 00:00:00 
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Fall 2017 
This course add...
This course addresses policy issues in emerging markets with a particular focus on financial crises and their implications. Over the last several years, we have witnessed a number of episodes of financial distress often leading to macroeconomic chaos, particularly in emerging markets. Financial fragility and market distress can come in many forms: Currency crises, banking crises, debt crises, or a mix of two or more of these crises. The purpose of this course is to provide students with frameworks and tools for analyzing the causes and consequences of financial fragilities and crises, as well as the policy responses they entail. To this end, the course will mix economic theory, country experiences, and actual policy responses to provide an in-depth understanding of the boom-bust cycles characteristic of emerging market economies. The course will also address the 2008 financial crisis, drawing on aspects that make this particular episode stand out from previous instances of turmoil. Emerging market policy responses to the 2008 crisis, as well as the effects on these countries of unconventional policy stimulus adopted by developed economies will also be discussed.
Spring 2018 
This course add...
This course addresses policy issues in emerging markets with a particular focus on financial crises and their implications. Over the last several years, we have witnessed a number of episodes of financial distress often leading to macroeconomic chaos, particularly in emerging markets. Financial fragility and market distress can come in many forms: Currency crises, banking crises, debt crises, or a mix of two or more of these crises. The purpose of this course is to provide students with frameworks and tools for analyzing the causes and consequences of financial fragilities and crises, as well as the policy responses they entail. To this end, the course will mix economic theory, country experiences, and actual policy responses to provide an in-depth understanding of the boom-bust cycles characteristic of emerging market economies. The course will also address the 2008 financial crisis, drawing on aspects that make this particular episode stand out from previous instances of turmoil. Emerging market policy responses to the 2008 crisis, as well as the effects on these countries of unconventional policy stimulus adopted by developed economies will also be discussed.