Jacqueline Mazza

Jacqueline Mazza, PhD

Professorial Lecturer, Latin American Studies Program
Latin American Studies
American Foreign Policy
International Development

Expertise

Regions
  • Latin America
  • Mexico
Topics
  • American Foreign Policy
  • Developing Nations
  • Foreign Aid and Global Poverty
  • Economic Development
  • Labor Economics and Outsourcing
  • Elections and Foreign Policy
  • Emerging Markets
  • U.S. Congress and Foreign Policy
Languages
  • Italian
  • Spanish

Background and Education

Dr. Mazza is currently an Adjunct Professor in the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Latin American Studies Program. Previously she was Principal Labor Markets Specialist at the Interamerican Development Bank (1993-2014). She teaches courses on US foreign policy towards Latin America and development and leads the SAIS-IDB research practicum course. She has taught at SAIS DC for the previous ten years and at SAIS Europe since Spring of 2014. Dr. Mazza has over 30 years of professional experience in labor markets, employment and development. She is a recognized regional expert in the areas of employment services, social inclusion, and migration and is currently writing in the fields of Chinese migration to Latin America and the Caribbean and labor intermediation services in developing countries.

Her publications include: Labor Intermediation Services in Developing Economies: Adapting Employment Services for a Global Age (2016); "Migration in a Mobile Age: Perspectives from China, India and the Americas," in Latin America and the Asian Giants: Evolving Ties with China and India, ed. R. Roett and G. Paz (2016); ”Connecting Workers to Jobs: Latin American Innovations," in Labor Intermediations Services,  Vol. 4, No. 2, 2013; Latin America Policy; Fast-Tracking Jobs: Advances in Latin America and the Caribbean (Interamerican Development Bank, 2011); Social and Labor Market Policies for Tumultuous Times (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010), co-author; "The Other Side of the Fence: Intraregional Migration in the Americas," in Migration Source (Migration Policy Institute,  Washington, DC., February 2010); The Outsiders: The Changing Patterns of Exclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean (Interamerican Development Bank, 2008); "Addressing Exclusion: Social Policy Perspectives from Latin America and the Caribbean," in Inclusive States: Social Policy and Structural Inequalities, ed. Anis Dani and Arjan de Haan (World Bank, 2008), with Mayra Buvinic; and Don’t Disturb the Neighbors: the United States and Democracy in Mexico: 1980-1995 (Routledge, 2003).

She received her PhD and MA from Johns Hopkins SAIS.
 


2015-02-27 00:00:00 
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Spring 2018 
This course wil...
This course will advance student learning on labor markets in developing countries and examine the range of policies that can be employed to improve employment outcomes and human capital development. The course will focus not only labor market policies but also on more integrated policies linked with labor markets such as social policy and economic development. The connection between social interventions, economic development and employment outcomes represents the next stage of thinking in development policy. Along these lines, "Jobs" was the subject of the 2013 World Development Report and is now one of five cross-cutting areas of the restructured World Bank.
 
This course will enable students to analyze, critique and apply a rethinking of social, economic and labor market policies to distinct developing country contexts examining in particular on how or whether these policies can support the poor towards better employment as a principal exit to poverty. Students will be analyzing the principal literature and studies in this emerging field and discussing the performance of these policies in distinct country contexts as this field defies model answers given such different contexts of high informality, urban/rural-driven economies, high youth unemployment or idleness or outmigration, to name a few factors.
Fall 2017 
In less than fi...
In less than five years from the WWII “Good Neighbor” Alliance, U.S. security policy converted Latin America into the principal battlefield of the U.S. Cold War against the Soviet Union. This half semester seminar course will get students debating how Latin America, at first considered a region of little threat to U.S. security interests, becomes the object of the full gamut of U.S. security instruments: covert operations, military intervention, support for military coups, economic sanctions, and diplomatic isolation waged in the name of saving Latin America from communism and preventing a second Cuba. Students will debate using readings and original source materials the U.S. interventions in Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs, Chile, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador and Nicaragua as well as Kennedy’s Alliance for Progress. Students will draw lessons on the current legacy of the Cold War in the region and the application of Cold War instruments and approaches to the present U.S. drug war.
Fall 2017 
This two-credit...
This two-credit course examines current U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America allowing students to go beyond “sound bites” and trace how U.S. policy towards the region shifted and diversified after the end of the Cold War and turned more inward after 9-11. The course begins at the fall of the Berlin Wall, examining distinct policy directions to reframe relations towards free trade, economic cooperation and democracy, while seemingly overwhelmed by domestic pressures reshaping drug and immigration policies in security terms, today simplified by one presidential candidate as fixable by building a “wall”. Students will discuss the role played by changes within Latin America itself, its political maturation (e.g. aging guerillas), as well as growing violence and crime. Despite perceived negative security trends, students will examine how the United States is achieving an opening towards Cuba and support for peace negotiations in Colombia.
Fall 2016 
In less than fi...
In less than five years from the WWII “Good Neighbor” Alliance, U.S. security policy converted Latin America into the principal battlefield of the U.S. Cold War against the Soviet Union. This half semester seminar course will get students debating how Latin America, at first considered a region of little threat to U.S. security interests, becomes the object of the full gamut of U.S. security instruments: covert operations, military intervention, support for military coups, economic sanctions, and diplomatic isolation waged in the name of saving Latin America from communism and preventing a second Cuba. Students will debate using readings and original source materials the U.S. interventions in Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs, Chile, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador and Nicaragua as well as Kennedy’s Alliance for Progress. Students will draw lessons on the current legacy of the Cold War in the region and the application of Cold War instruments and approaches to the present U.S. drug war.
Fall 2016 
This two-credit...
This two-credit course examines current U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America allowing students to go beyond “sound bites” and trace how U.S. policy towards the region shifted and diversified after the end of the Cold War and turned more inward after 9-11. The course begins at the fall of the Berlin Wall, examining distinct policy directions to reframe relations towards free trade, economic cooperation and democracy, while seemingly overwhelmed by domestic pressures reshaping drug and immigration policies in security terms, today simplified by one presidential candidate as fixable by building a “wall”. Students will discuss the role played by changes within Latin America itself, its political maturation (e.g. aging guerillas), as well as growing violence and crime. Despite perceived negative security trends, students will examine how the United States is achieving an opening towards Cuba and support for peace negotiations in Colombia.
Spring 2015 
This course is ...
This course is designed to demonstrate how to conduct development policy research of direct application to a multilateral lending program through a semester-long development research project focused on Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries in association with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The course offers a series of overview lectures on multilateral lending and faculty-guided team research on the course’s preselected research topics (please refer to the syllabus). Course deliverables will consist of one individual brief and two group outputs: a topic-centered team research paper and a formal team presentation at the IDB. This course is part of a series of joint initiatives between the IDB and SAIS under the IDB’s Office of Outreach and Partnerships.
May 2, 2017 
Jacqueline Mazz...

Jacqueline Mazza, Adjunct Professor of International Development, gave two presentation at the University of Bergamo on the topic of "Mexico-U.S. border."

April 12, 2017 
Jacqueline Mazz...

Jacqueline Mazza, Adjunct Professor of International Development, will present her latest book at the International Labour Organization entitled "Labor Intermediation Services in Developing Economies: Adapting Employment Services in a Global Age."