The Brief, October 2018: Trade Liberalization Keeps Working While Washington Rattles its Foundations





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October 8, 2018

Trade Liberalization Keeps Working While Washington Rattles its Foundations

The Trump administration's ongoing trade wars heated up quickly in recent weeks as new tariffs and updates to longstanding multilateral deals drove intense public debate. School experts celebrated signs of progress as well as warned of looming threats.

SBS Australia discussed updated analysis of the Trans-Pacific Partnership co-authored by SAIS Europe Director Michael G. Plummer which revealed that the now 11-member deal will grow national income, boost exports, lift investment, and increase worker wages. Read more

As an updated NAFTA pact moved forward, Center for Canadian Studies Director Christopher Sands wrote in Open Canada about the serious damage the negotiating process has caused. "Now that the Trump administration has demanded Canada accept less and do more, anti-Americanism will have a wider appeal" among Canadians. Read more.

Senior Research Professor of International Economics Anne O. Krueger wrote in Asia Times about Washington blocking all nominees to replace expiring terms of World Trade Organization arbitration judges. "Once there is no quorum, no appeals cases can be heard, and some countries might start to violate WTO rules with impunity." Read more

Appearing on Pod Bless Canada, Christopher Sands summarized the White House's approach to trade that makes many economists wary. "The very institutions that have structured our relationship and have made it nonpolitical are being shaken by the Trump administration." Hear more

The Brief highlights Johns Hopkins SAIS expertise on current events and is produced monthly by the Office of Marketing, Communications, and Strategic Initiatives. Like The Brief? Share it on Facebook and Twitter, forward to a friend, or subscribe.