William A. Booth

William A. Booth, PhD

Adjunct Professor, Latin American Studies Program, Bologna Campus
Latin American Studies

SAIS Europe
Bologna, Italy

Expertise

Regions
  • Latin America
  • Mexico
  • United States
Topics
  • American Foreign Policy
  • Nation-building and Democratization
Languages
  • Spanish

Background and Education

University of Oxford, St. Catherine's College, Faculty Member. An early career researcher in modern history, Professor Booth specializes in the histories of Mexico and of communism, but is also interested in the Cold War more generally, in global strands of socialism, anarchism and communism, and in literature and the left. After an undergraduate degree in Modern History and Politics at the University of Oxford, he went on to the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of London to undertake an MA in 2003. His did doctoral research on the Mexican left in 2008 and completed his PhD in summer 2012 and graduated that December from the ISA, University of London. He taught Mexican History at Warwick and Latin American History at LSE and UCL.

Publications
"Hegemonic Nationalism, Subordinate Marxism: The Mexican Left, 1945–7," in Journal of Latin American Studies (2017); "Mid-Century Communisms: A Schematic Approach?" in The International Newsletter of Communist Studies, XVIII (2012)


2017-06-27 00:00:00 
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Fall 2017 
The course prov...
The course provides a comprehensive introduction to contemporary Latin American politics with special emphasis on the post-Cold War era (1990-current). The course is divided into four parts: (i) the state in contemporary Latin America; (ii) evaluating the quality of democracy in Latin America; (iii) the political development of specific Latin American countries and regions; and (iv) new directions in twenty-first century Latin American politics. The course addresses two main themes: the on-going process of state building in the region with a focus on the interaction between state institutions and society, and the challenges of democratisation in the region within the given political, social, and economic context. (Cross listed Latin American Studies/International Development)