Matthew Rojansky

Matthew Rojansky, JD

Adjunct Lecturer of European and Eurasian Studies
European and Eurasian Studies

Expertise

Regions
  • Belarus
  • Moldova
  • Russia
  • Ukraine

Background and Education

Matthew Rojansky is an adjunct lecturer at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, and the Director of the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.  He is an expert on U.S. relations with the states of the former Soviet Union, especially Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova.  He has advised governments, intergovernmental organizations, and major private actors on conflict resolution and efforts to enhance shared security throughout the Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian region. 

From 2010-2013, he was Deputy Director of the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.  There, he founded Carnegie's Ukraine Program, led a multi-year project to support U.S.-Russia health cooperation, and created a track-two task force to promote resolution of the Moldova-Transnistra conflict.  From 2007-2010, Rojansky served as executive director of the Partnership for a Secure America, where he orchestrated high-level bipartisan initiatives aimed at repairing the U.S.-Russia relationship, strenghtening the U.S. commitment to nuclear arms control and nonproliferation, and leveraging global science engagement for diplomacy. 

Rojansky is also an adjunct professor at American University, and a participant in the Dartmouth Dialogues, a track-two U.S-Russian conflict resolution initiative begun in 1960. 


 
Prof. Rojansky's field research in Ukraine sheds light on the history, causes and methodologies of raiding, as well as on the costs and consequences of raiding for Ukraine's further development.
Demokratizatsiy...

Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Volume 22, Number 3 / Summer 2014

Abstract: Corporate raiding in Ukraine is a widely discussed and reported problem that severely damages investment and economic development, prospects for European integration, and the welfare of ordinary people. Yet the phenomenon of raiding itself is only poorly understood, often either dismissed as inseparable from the country's broader problem of endemic corruption, or imputed to powerful and shadowy raiders thought to be immune from defensive measures by private businesses. The author's field research in Ukraine sheds light on the history, causes and methodologies of raiding, as well as on the costs and consequences of raiding for Ukraine's further development.

 
Chapter 8 of "St...

Chapter 8 of "Strategic Stability: Contending Interpretations," published by the Strategic Studies Institute at the U.S. Army War College.

 
Article in Issu...

Article in Issue 2 of "Security Community" the OSCE Magazine

 
Article written...

Article written for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 
Policy Outlook ...

Policy Outlook for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, co-author with James F. Collins

 
Article in "The ...

Article in "The Military-Industrial Courier" (in Russia)

 
Policy Outlook ...

Policy Outlook for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Spring 2017 
Ukraine, Belaru...
Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova lie in a strategically important region of the Euro-Atlantic space. In the more than 20 years since they have gained their independence from the Soviet Union, these states have been alternatively excluded from collective security and economic integration, and made instruments in conflict between East and West. Yet each has developed along its own distinct and complex path, reflecting inherited challenges related to nationality, identity, and historical memory, as well as current disputes over security alliances, control of resources, and political systems. This course investigates domestic political, social, and economic questions, including issues of identity; foreign policy orientations; relations with NATO, the US, and the EU; the influence of Russia; and the successes and failures of reintegration of the East European borderlands into post-Soviet Eurasia.