David W. Ellwood

David W. Ellwood, PhD

Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies
European and Eurasian Studies
American Foreign Policy
International Relations
Global Theory and History

SAIS Europe

Expertise

Regions
  • Europe
  • Italy
  • United Kingdom
Topics
  • European Union and Transatlantic Relations
Languages
  • English
  • French
  • Italian

Background and Education

Formerly associate professor of contemporary international history at the University of Bologna (until November 2012); has served as president of the International Association for Media and History (1996-2002); PhD, Italian studies, University of Reading

Publications:The Shock of America: Europe and the Challenge of the Century (Oxford University Press, 2012) (Italian edition, Carocci Editore, 2012) (second edition 2016); The Movies as History: Visions of the 20th Century, editor (Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2000); Hollywood in Europe: experiences of a cultural hegemony (VU University Press, 1994); Rebuilding Europe: The U.S. and the Reconstruction of Western Europe (Pearson Longman Publishing, 1992) (Italian edition, Il Mulino 1996); Hollywood in Europa: industria, politica, pubblico del cinema 1945-1960¸ with G. Brunetta (Casa Usher, 1991); Italy 1943-45: The Politics of Liberation (Leicester University Press, 1985). Frequent contributor of articles and reviews to academic journals, policy forums and news outlets.


 
Prof. Ellwood comments on the electoral success of the UK Independence Party, which received 27.5% of the vote in the recent European elections
Spring 2018 
As the use of m...
As the use of military force to resolve disputes between nations becomes less plausible in most regions of the world so the struggle for influence intensifies. This trend is reinforced by the diffusion of conventional forms of power away from governments to non-state actors, and the ever-greater speed of the 'information revolution'. Among the consequences has been the rise to global fame of the concept of 'Soft Power', in theory a means to turn a country's attributes and achievements into a lever for gaining advantage in international competitions of all sorts. China has invested in it heavily and consciously. Even nations such as Russia and Iran are using soft power language and tools. The British foreign minister talks of a 'race for soft power'.  Image-making, cultural diplomacy and propaganda are all components of a state's – or an institution's – soft power strategy today.

The course will study the inter-acting dynamics of 'soft' and 'hard' power, using contemporary and historical perspectives.  It will suggest that the tension between them can best be understood in terms of the politics of sovereignty, identity and – above all – modernity. Rising waves of anxiety everywhere about relations between national communities and globalised markets, between the state and its citizens, between generations, genders, ethnic groups and religions are all part of the politics of identity and modernization. Would-be models of modernity present themselves as soft power superpowers in these confrontations.

Case studies from around the world will show that a real and imagined America has been and remains central to many disputes about the relationship between power, influence and modernity. No matter how much weaker America's conventional forms of hegemony may appear compared to their heyday, American products, icons, technologies, languages, media industries, personalities etc can still project forms of innovation which other societies feel they must come to terms with, if they want to choose modernity over marginalization. In contrast, much political extremism in the last century and this one is a reaction against western, capitalist forms of modernity, and America's in particular. (Cross listed American Foreign Policy/European and Eurasian Studies/International Relations) (T&H)
April 20, 2017 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote an article for Affarinternazionali entitled "GB: voto anticipato causa Brexit (in Italian)."

March 8, 2017 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote a piece on Affarinternazionali entitled "Débâcle laburista: la lezione dei seggi dimenticati (in Italian)."

December 12, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote an article for USC> entitled "Eating for Your Country: Italy's Lead in Gastrodiplomacy."

September 30, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote a piece for Affarinternazionali entitled "Corbyn resiste al terremoto post-Brexit (in Italian)."

July 13, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote a piece for Affarinternazionale entitled "Brexit, Scozia infelice ostaggio dei tempi lunghi (in Italian)."

June 12, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, discusses contradictions in the Brexit debate in the Italian online magazine AffarInternazionali in a commentary entitled "Brexit, contraddizioni bilaterali (in Italian)."

February 24, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, is interviewed on Radiopopolare about "Referendum/UE-GB - Nulla sarà come prima (in Italian)."

February 8, 2016 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote an article for Affarinternazionali entitled "Cameron-Tusk, bozza di un accordo anti-brexit (in Italian)."

November 24, 2015 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote an article for Affarinternazionali entitled "Ambiguità laburiste su Brexit (in Italian)."

September 30, 2015 
David W. Ellwoo...

David W. Ellwood, Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, wrote an article for Affarinternazionali entitled "Cameron sui migranti provoca l'Ue (in Italian)."