South Asia Studies

South Asia Studies at SAIS

The South Asia Studies program offers an opportunity to concentrate on a region whose importance in international affairs is increasingly recognized by the policy and corporate community.

Exploring Sino-Indian Relations

January 2013 Study Trip to China

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Exploring Sino-Indian Relations

In January 2013, the South Asia Studies program organized a ten-day study trip to China that involved graduate students from SAIS, and Indian and Chinese universities. The focus of this study trip was the evolving relationship between India and China.  The students began with a series of briefings in Shanghai (China’s chief commercial center) and the moved to Beijing (the political capital). The Shanghai portion of the trip focused on trade while the Beijing portion focused on formal diplomatic relations between India and China. A second graduate student trip is being planned for January 2014, which will focus on Chinese and Indian foreign aid programs in Africa and again involve students from the three countries traveling to Africa together.

Photo credit: Colin Cookman, January 2013

Comparing Chinese and Indian Development

January 2012 Study Trip to India and China

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Comparing Chinese and Indian Development

In January 2012, South Asia Studies and China Studies program teamed up to organize a two-week study trip to Shanghai, China and New Delhi, India that sought to compare the development strategies of these two Asian giants. The students began in Shanghai, China's chief commercial capital, and met with representatives of Shanghai Municipal Government, David Barboza of the New York Times, visited a Suzhou Industrial Park, and a model farm on the outskirts of Shanghai. Next the participants flew to New Delhi, India where they met with Ambassador Peter Burleigh, U.S. Charge d' Affaires in India; Sheila Dixit, the Chief Minister of Delhi; CHINTAN, an NGO focusing on environmentally sustainable development. For many the highlight of the India portion was a private dinner with justices of the Indian Supreme Court, and a discussion on the evolving role of the judiciary in India's economic development.

For more information, please read the SAIS Reports article published on this trip.

Photo credit: Rebecca Aman, January 2012

The South Asia Studies Program provides a foundation for understanding the dynamics of this crucial region and offers students the opportunity to concentrate on a part of the world whose importance in international affairs is increasingly recognized by the policy and corporate community.
 
The curriculum provides an insight into the central dilemmas of modern politics, economic development and social change present in the region. Interdisciplinary courses address South Asia’s growing economic and strategic importance as well as its political history, its complex social structures and the challenges of development.
 

 

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Curriculum

 

South Asia Studies | M.A. Academic Requirements

South Asia Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.
 
SOUTH ASIA STUDIES
Students concentrating in South Asia Studies must take at least 4 courses within this program. One of those courses must be Comparative Political & Economic Development in South Asia (SA.790.820) and must be taken in their first year (those starting in Bologna must take the course in DC).
 
ASIAN STUDIES
Students also must fulfill the general requirements for the field of Asian Studies, that is, an additional 2 Asian Studies courses outside of South Asia Studies.
 
Students in South Asia Studies also have the option of pursuing a specialization in the International Relations of Asia (AsiaIR).

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. South Asia Studies concentrators must pass Comparative National Systems as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

South Asia Studies MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in Hindi-Urdu or Persian (Farsi). All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS. Native Hindi-Urdu or Persian (Farsi) speakers must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English.

 

CAPSTONE

South Asia Studies concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     South Asia Studies Oral Exam.
2.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Curriculum

 

South Asia Studies | M.A. Academic Requirements

South Asia Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.
 
SOUTH ASIA STUDIES
Students concentrating in South Asia Studies must take at least 4 courses within this program. One of those courses must be Comparative Political & Economic Development in South Asia (SA.790.820) and must be taken in their first year (those starting in Bologna must take the course in DC).
 
ASIAN STUDIES
Students also must fulfill the general requirements for the field of Asian Studies, that is, an additional 2 Asian Studies courses outside of South Asia Studies.
 
Students in South Asia Studies also have the option of pursuing a specialization in the International Relations of Asia (AsiaIR).

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. South Asia Studies concentrators must pass Comparative National Systems as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

South Asia Studies MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in Hindi-Urdu or Persian (Farsi). All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS. Native Hindi-Urdu or Persian (Farsi) speakers must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English.

 

CAPSTONE

South Asia Studies concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     South Asia Studies Oral Exam.
2.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Waiver Exams

Faculty

Featured Courses

  1. Fall 2013

    Infrastructure and Development in South Asia and Study Trip

    DescriptionInfrastructure is a critical element in economic development, but it...

Program Activities

 

Internships

Internship choice is critical to the student’s academic studies and career prospects. The program director and other faculty members work closely with students to identify and pursue opportunities appropriate to their interests within the region or relevant organizations in the United States.

 

South Asia Career Luncheon Series

To complement students’ course work, the South Asia Studies Program hosts biweekly luncheons on careers that would be relevant to students concentrating in South Asia. Here students have the opportunity to network with academics, policymakers, journalists, businesspeople and NGO representatives and to research career options. South Asia students will be invited to all career luncheons and will be given a schedule of upcoming speakers during orientation. Lunch will be provided by the program and attendance and active participation is encouraged.

 

South Asia Seminars

In addition to a biweekly career luncheon series, the program hosts a number of public seminars on various topics related to South Asia. Past speakers include the Maldivian and Bangladeshi foreign ministers, the current foreign secretary of Pakistan, ambassadors from the region and the U.S. assistant secretary of State for South and Central Asia.
 

South Asia Retreat

The South Asia Studies Program hosts a retreat for its students and faculty members at the beginning of each academic year.  Students have the opportunity to become acquainted with each other and the program. The retreat includes a debate by policy experts on a topical issue, an administrative brief, leisure time, a classical musical presentation and a dinner with fellow local South Asianists.
 

Student Study Trips to South Asia

It is the goal of the South Asia Studies Program to ensure that while studying at SAIS, students have the ability to visit the region and experience firsthand many of the themes discussed in the classroom. In recent years, the program has organized a comparative trip to China and India to discuss economic development models (Winter 2012), a trip to China to study Sino-Indian relations (Winter 2013), and a trip to Sri Lanka to study post conflict reconstruction and reconciliation (Spring 2013).
 

For the 2013-2014 academic year South Asia Studies will organize trips to:

  • Ethiopia (US-India-China Initiative sponsored trip) to study Indian and Chinese foreign aid policy (January 2014). This trip will bring together students from Indian, Chinese and US institutions of higher learning. 
  • India to study infrastructure development (January 2014)
  • Nepal (Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies) to study migrant labor and the role of remittances (March 2014)

Study Trip Travel Blogs

New Delhi, India: Infrastructure and Development

A
ddis Ababa, Ethiopia: Chinese and Indian Aid and Investment in Ethiopia

K
athmandu, Nepal: Socio-Economic Impact of Mass Migration to the Gulf

Students will be given more information about applying during orientation. Priority will be given to second-year South Asia Studies students. In most cases, study trips are nearly fully funded. For additional questions please contact southasia@jhu.edu.
 

 

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

Program Activities: Europe

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events



Research

  1. Jan 10, 2013

    US India China Initiative

    Promoting Growth and Prosperity through Collaboration and Exchange

    Background

        
    As never before, the world’s attention and fortunes are tied to the burgeoning growth of India and China; the world’s largest populations and its fastest growing bilateral trade relationship. Recognizing the critical nature of understanding this dynamic, the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at The Johns Hopkins University has created the US-India-China Initiative (USICI) to facilitate greater collaboration, knowledge and leadership exchange between people of influence in India, China, and the US. The US-India-China Initiative (USICI) was launched with a generous grant  in August 2012 from the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, one of the world’s largest corporations based in India.
     
    Objective

    The USICI staff has put in motion the planning of several activities based on initial contributions. These efforts include a student research trip to China in January 2013 that involved graduate students from SAIS, and Indian and Chinese universities. The focus of the ten-day study trip was the evolving relationship between India and China and involved meetings both in Shanghai (China’s chief commercial center) and Beijing (the political capital). The focus of the Shanghai portion of the trip was trade and the focus in Beijing was formal diplomatic relations between India and China. A second graduate student trip is being planned for January 2014, which would focus on Chinese and Indian aid programs in Africa and again involve students from the three countries traveling to Africa together. The conference on “Doing Business in India and China” (March 2013) was the formal launch for the Initiative and featured presentations by prominent figures with global visibility from academia, business and journalism. The conference also included “trip-reports” from the participants from the January 2013 study trip to China.
     
    Over the next three years, the Initiative plans to engage in a robust series of interrelated programming including conferences, student trips and joint research projects with participants from the US, India and China.
     
    Activities
                                                      
    Conferences: The USICI plans to host three annual conferences, one in each country, on timely issues relating to US-India-China relations. These conferences will provide an opportunity for current private and public sector luminaries to connect with experts in academia, industry and government. Proposed topics include: tri-lateral cooperation around energy and energy alternatives, higher education as a vehicle for economic growth; the frontiers of technology and information services; transnational infrastructure cooperation; the role of the finance sector in development, and the role of entrepreneurship in growth. The Initiative will seek corporate co-sponsors for the conference to demonstrate broad tri-lateral support for the programs and off-set expenses. 
     
    Junior and Senior Fellows: Each year the Initiative will select a cohort of  Junior Fellows, Each cohort will travel to each of the countries and develop scholarly research, business case studies and in-depth articles that will be presented at the conferences noted above and showcased on the USICI portal.
     
    Student Trips: The Initiative sponsors student study trips involving participants from the US, India and China.
     
     
    Looking Ahead
     
    The Initiative is housed at SAIS in Washington, DC and directed by Dr. Walter Andersen, a respected scholar, diplomat and Director of the SAIS South Asia Studies Program. An advisory committee comprised of representatives of the Ambani Group, other funders, key business leaders, and public sector luminaries, will be recruited to serve and called upon to help finalize conference topics, recruit conference speakers, and nominate Fellows. Ms. Neelima Kota is a Program Associate involved in planning and Ms. Rebecca Aman is the chief administrative officer.
     
    SAIS leadership will ensure the Initiative meets all operating requirements of Johns Hopkins University, which represents the ultimate governing body of SAIS and the Initiative.
     
    The US-India-China Initiative has the potential to be the foremost respected convener in this field. It will address a significant gap in mutual understanding and interpersonal interaction between these two emerging economic giants and will foster a powerful network of the future academic, business, and policy experts with the experiences, insight and understanding to help the world navigate critical US, India and China relations.

Our Alumni

Contact Us

Walter Andersen
Administrative Director of the South Asia Studies Program, Senior Adjunct Professor

wandersen@jhu.edu
202-663-5838
Rome 720

Rebecca Aman
Academic Program Manager

raman2@jhu.edu
202-663-5722

Address & Phone

South Asia Studies
Rome Building
1619 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20036
  • 202-663-5722
  • 202-663-5769