International Law and Organizations

International Law & Organizations Program
The International Law and Organizations Program prepares graduates to work in human rights, the rule of law, post-conflict reconstruction, environmental cooperation, corporate social responsibility, protection of international investment, negotiation of international trade agreements and other areas handled by multilateral organizations and NGOs.

The program provides a working knowledge of the general principles of international law, multilateral organizations, and the particular regimes that govern international human rights, international arms control, the limits and use of military force, the law of the sea, regulation of the environment, international health problems, and investment and trade.

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Curriculum

 

INTERNATIONAL LAW & ORGANIZATIONS | M.A. Academic Requirements

International Law and Organizations Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate.  Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.
 

INTERNATIONAL LAW AND ORGANIZATIONS

Students concentrating in International Law and Organizations (ILAW) must take at least 4 courses within this program.  

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Students must also fulfill the general requirements for International Relations (IR) which includes 2 additional courses within IR from two IR or selected Policy Areas other than ILAW. These areas include:

IR Areas:
·         Conflict Management     
·         Global Theory and History
Policy Areas:
·         Energy, Resources and Environment
·         Strategic Studies
 
IR students studying at SAIS Europe must take at least three IR courses in Washington with the exception of dual-degree or advanced-standing students, who need must take at least two IR courses in Washington.
 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.
 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.
 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. ILAW concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations
 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.  

CAPSTONE

International Law concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     Submission of a substantial (no less than 8,000 words, including footnotes or endnotes) research paper of publishable quality on March 1st of their final semester. This paper can be the revised product of a regular IL course or independent research supervised by an IL faculty member.
2.     Successful completion of an oral exam testing the student’s knowledge of international law and organizations based on the student's particular coursework. The exam will be administered at the end of the student’s final semester by at least one full-time or adjunct professor from the International Law & Organizations Program.
3.     Successful completion of an IL tools course during the student's second year that is based on practical applications of substantive law. The following count as IL tools courses: Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (SA.650.802), PACE/ICLN International Criminal Court Moot Competition (sa.650.800) or International Human Rights Clinic (SA.650.780).
4.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)
 
**For those whose final semester is fall, consult the Program Director for due date.
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013

Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Curriculum

 

INTERNATIONAL LAW & ORGANIZATIONS | M.A. Academic Requirements

International Law and Organizations Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate.  Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.
 

INTERNATIONAL LAW AND ORGANIZATIONS

Students concentrating in International Law and Organizations (ILAW) must take at least 4 courses within this program.  

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Students must also fulfill the general requirements for International Relations (IR) which includes 2 additional courses within IR from two IR or selected Policy Areas other than ILAW. These areas include:

IR Areas:
·         Conflict Management     
·         Global Theory and History
Policy Areas:
·         Energy, Resources and Environment
·         Strategic Studies
 
IR students studying at SAIS Europe must take at least three IR courses in Washington with the exception of dual-degree or advanced-standing students, who need must take at least two IR courses in Washington.
 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.
 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.
 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. ILAW concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations
 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.  

CAPSTONE

International Law concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     Submission of a substantial (no less than 8,000 words, including footnotes or endnotes) research paper of publishable quality on March 1st of their final semester. This paper can be the revised product of a regular IL course or independent research supervised by an IL faculty member.
2.     Successful completion of an oral exam testing the student’s knowledge of international law and organizations based on the student's particular coursework. The exam will be administered at the end of the student’s final semester by at least one full-time or adjunct professor from the International Law & Organizations Program.
3.     Successful completion of an IL tools course during the student's second year that is based on practical applications of substantive law. The following count as IL tools courses: Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (SA.650.802), PACE/ICLN International Criminal Court Moot Competition (sa.650.800) or International Human Rights Clinic (SA.650.780).
4.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)
 
**For those whose final semester is fall, consult the Program Director for due date.
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013

Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Waiver Exams

Faculty

Pages

Featured Courses

  1. Fall 2013

    Introduction to International Law

    Considers the role of treaty law, customary international law and...

  2. Fall 2013

    Jessup Moot Court

    A moot court team competition provides an introduction to legal...

  3. Fall 2013

    International Human Rights Clinic

    This course is designed to teach students skills for careers...

  4. Fall 2013

    International Trade Law

    Examines the law and institutions of the WTO, including its...

  5. Fall 2013

    PACE/ICLN International Criminal Court Moot Competition

    A moot court team competition provides an introduction to legal...

  6. Fall 2013

    Law of War and the American Civil War

    ...

  7. Fall 2013

    Economic Migrants, Refugees & Human Security

    The Course will provide a brief overview of current challenges...

  8. Fall 2013

    International Human Rights

    This is a survey course on international human rights (law)...

  9. Fall 2013

    Foundations of International Law

    This is a basic international law course designed to introduce...

  10. Spring 2014

    United Nations and International Security

    What is the role of the United Nations in maintaining...

  11. Spring 2014

    International Trafficking in Persons

    Examines trafficking in persons, a human rights violation and a...

  12. Spring 2014

    International Environmental Law

    Explores international environmental law, including human health. Examines international regimes...

  13. Spring 2014

    International Investment Law

    Analyzes the legal framework for private international investment. Looks at...

  14. Spring 2014

    Transnational Business and Human Rights

    This course will examine the complexities of transnational and cross-political...

  15. Spring 2014

    U.S. Constitutional Law and the International System

    The American tradition of judicial review by independent courts has...

  16. Spring 2014

    The Role of International Tribunals in Dispute Resolution: Investment Arbitration, War Time Damages, Territorial Claims, and the Maritime Boundaries of Fish, Gas and Oil

    An increasingly well-developed system of international arbitration is now resolving...

  17. Spring 2014

    Constitutional Development & Democratization

    There have been dramatic constitutional developments and legal reform in...

  18. Spring 2014

    Multiculturalism & the Human Rights of Women

    The first part of this course is designed to explore...

  19. Spring 2014

    International Trade Law

    Suitable for non-lawyers, this introduction to international trade law will...

Program Activities

 

Speaker Series and Student Trips

The International Law and Organizations Program has an active speaker series, featuring policymakers, diplomats and international lawyers involved in current issues. The program occasionally sponsors a student trip to the United Nations in New York for high-level briefings, as well as small-group visits in Washington, D.C., to the U.S. Supreme Court to hear oral arguments and to the U.S. State Department Legal Adviser’s Office. Students also may have the opportunity to take part in an international academic field trip, contingent on available funding. Through generous support from the Starr Foundation, the program has organized trips to India (November 2009), Sri Lanka (March 2011) Bangladesh (March 2012) and Cambodia/Thailand (August 2013). Furthermore, students have access to the American Society of International Law and its annual Washington meeting and the American Bar Association Committee on Law and National Security, which hosts speakers on the law of armed conflict, arms control and counterterrorism. Students also have the opportunity to attend International Law Weekend, an annual conference held in New York City, sponsored by the American Branch of the International Law Association and the International Law Students Association. The United States Institute of Peace, the Brookings Institution and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, all in close proximity to SAIS's Washington campus, also present programs on the United Nations.  

Internships

SAIS students have held internships at the U.N. Human Rights Committee in New York and Geneva, the U.N. Department of Peacekeeping Operations, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the International Criminal Court, the U.N. Foundation, and various development organizations and human rights NGOs, including the Foundation for Human Rights Initiatives in Uganda. The program has some financial resources for internship placements and supports its students in seeking supplemental funding.

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

Program Activities: Europe

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events



2014

  1. The Garment Industry in Bangladesh: One Year After the Rana Plaza Collapse 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM May7

    Shamarukh Mohiuddin, president of Lift Up Asia and executive director of the U.S. Bangladesh Advisory Council, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is off the record.

  2. Jessup Moot Court Dress Rehearsal 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM Feb19

    The SAIS Jessup International Moot Court Competition team will present their arguments for a dress rehearsal. Professors Ruth Wedgwood, Steven Schneebaum, and Daniel Magraw will serve as judges. Note: A reception will follow.

2013

  1. International Court of Justice Ruling on the Temple of Preah Vihear 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM Dec5

    SAIS graduate students who participated in the International Law and Organizations Program’s summer field trip to Cambodia and Thailand, will discuss this topic. NOTE: The speakers’ comments will be not for attribution. Space is limited for this event.

  2. A Voice Behind the Drones: One Civilian Survivor Speaks Out 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Nov15

    Faisal bin Ali Jaber, a Yemeni government employee who lost family members from drone strikes; Alka Pradhan, a U.S. counterterrorism counsel at the U.K.-based NGO Reprieve; and Cori Crider, strategic director of Reprieve’s Abuses in Counterterrorism Team, will discuss this topic.

  3. Combating the Illegal Wildlife Trade in Southeast Asia 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM Oct16

    Nick Marx, Wildlife Programs director at Wildlife Alliance, will discuss this topic. 

  4. The Discreet Charm of Legitimacy: The United Nations, Crisis Management and Reform 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Sep16

    Danilo Türk, former president of Slovenia, former Slovenian ambassador to the United Nations and U.N. Security Council member, will discuss this topic.

  5. The Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Domestic Workers: Case Studies of Kuwait and the Philippines 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Apr30

    Students participating in the SAIS International Human Rights Clinic will discuss their March 2013 study field trips to Kuwait and the Philippines and their conclusions regarding the promotion and protection of the rights of migrant domestic workers. 

  6. Being the President’s Voice 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Apr15

    John McConnell, former senior speechwriter for President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney, will discuss this topic.Note: This event is open to the SAIS community only, and the speaker’s comments will be off the record.

  7. A Few Good Women: The Inclusion of Women in Corporate Leadership 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Mar27

    Barbara Franklin, former U.S. secretary of Commerce and chair of the National Association of Corporate Directors, will discuss this topic.

  8. Drone Courts and Other Flying Dangers 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Mar5

    Garrett Epps, professor of law at the University of Baltimore, will discuss this topic. 

Research

Our Alumni

External Resources

Contact Us

Ruth Wedgwood
Edward B. Burling Professor of International Law and Diplomacy, Director of the International Law and Organizations Program

rwedgwood@jhu.edu
Rome 418

Tiffany Basciano
Associate Director

tbascia1@jhu.edu
Rome 420

Address & Phone

International Law and Organizations
Rome Building
1619 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20036
  • 202-663-5982