Global Theory and History

Global Theory and History Program

"Drawing upon the insights of scholars and practitioners and upon historical experience, Global Theory and History addresses the large questions of statecraft."

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

Shanghai 2011

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

Shanghai 2011

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

Shanghai 2011

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

Beijing 2011

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

2011

Great Wall of China

Global Theory and History China Study Trip

Global Theory and History China Study Trip - 2011

Meeting with General Gong Xianfu

Global Theory and History China Study Trip - 2011

Shanghai

The Global Theory and History Program examines continuity and change in the formation and maturation of territorially focused relations, along with transnational forces and ideologies. The program includes the interplay of political economy, diplomatic and military strategies, and cultural civilizations.

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Curriculum

 

Global Theory & History | M.A. Requirements

Global Theory and History Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

GLOBAL THEORY AND HISTORY (GTH)

Students concentrating in Global Theory & History (GTH) must take a minimum of 4 courses within this program. Students are encouraged to take additional GTH courses.

 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (IR)

Students must also fulfill the general requirements for International Relations (IR) which include 2 additional courses within IR from two different IR or selected Policy areas other than GTH. These areas include:

IR Areas:
·         Conflict Management
·         International Law and Organizations
Policy Areas:
·         Energy, Resources and Environment
·         Strategic Studies
 
IR students studying at SAIS Europe must take at least three IR courses in Washington with the exception of dual-degree or advanced-standing students, who must take at least two IR courses in Washington.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Student must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. GTH concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.

 

CAPSTONE

Global Theory & History concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 

  1. A twenty-page research paper whose focus and subject matter has been approved by the director
  2. A twenty-page written report that draws conclusions about international relations or international political economy based on an internship undertaken while at SAIS
  3. Successful completion of Contemporary Theory of International Relations (SA.600.702)
  4. MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors- if eligible)
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010
 

Curriculum

 

Global Theory & History | M.A. Requirements

Global Theory and History Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

GLOBAL THEORY AND HISTORY (GTH)

Students concentrating in Global Theory & History (GTH) must take a minimum of 4 courses within this program. Students are encouraged to take additional GTH courses.

 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (IR)

Students must also fulfill the general requirements for International Relations (IR) which include 2 additional courses within IR from two different IR or selected Policy areas other than GTH. These areas include:

IR Areas:
·         Conflict Management
·         International Law and Organizations
Policy Areas:
·         Energy, Resources and Environment
·         Strategic Studies
 
IR students studying at SAIS Europe must take at least three IR courses in Washington with the exception of dual-degree or advanced-standing students, who must take at least two IR courses in Washington.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Student must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. GTH concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.

 

CAPSTONE

Global Theory & History concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 

  1. A twenty-page research paper whose focus and subject matter has been approved by the director
  2. A twenty-page written report that draws conclusions about international relations or international political economy based on an internship undertaken while at SAIS
  3. Successful completion of Contemporary Theory of International Relations (SA.600.702)
  4. MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors- if eligible)
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010
 

Waiver Exams

Faculty

Pages

Featured Courses

Theory and history in international relations are necessary for holistic interpretation.  To paraphrase an old adage, analysis without theory has no eyes with which to see; theory without historical basis has no legs upon which to stand.  Ultimately, historically grounded theoretical assessment is only as strong as its concepts and logic are appropriate to the substance (practice) of international relations.

  1. Fall 2014

    Contemporary Theory in International Relations - Professor Charles Doran

    This class satisfies the Capstone requirement for Global Theory and...

  2. Fall 2014

    Transnational Crime, Conflict and the State - Professor Svante Cornell

    Organized crime has traditionally tended to be studied from the...

  3. Fall 2014

    The Role of Religion in Contemporary Policymaking - Professor Leila Austin

    The accepted notion that religion is destined to fade as...

  4. Fall 2014

    News Media and International Affairs - Professor Michael Mosettig

    Thursday 8:00 am - 10:30 am,  Nitze 507A graduate-level seminar...

  5. News Media and International Affairs - Professor Steven Mufson

     Tuesday 8:15 am - 10:15 am,  Nitze 507This seminar will...

  6. Spring 2015

    Ethics, Choice & A Just World Order - Professor William Douglas

    Since the moral issues involved in the Cold War receded,...

  7. Spring 2015

    News Media and International Affairs - Professor Michael Getler

    This course, in lecture/seminar form, will explore and examine one...

  8. Spring 2015

    Applied Methods of Political Research - Professor Peter Lewis

    ...

  9. Spring 2015

    Comparative Political Economy - Professor Matthias Matthijs

    Political economy is defined as the study of the dynamic...

  10. Spring 2015

    Politics and Literature - Professor Leila Austin

    This seminar rests on the premise that politics is more...

  11. Spring 2015

    Advanced Topics in International Political Economy - Professor Matthias Matthijs

    ...

  12. Fall 2014

    Comparative Political Economy - Professor Matthias Matthijs

    Political economy is defined as the study of the dynamic...

Program Activities

 

Lecture Series

Informal lectures are given throughout the semester by academics, diplomats and business professionals on varied topics of interest.

 

Internships

Students who seek internships with the U.S. government, the private sector and nongovernmental organizations will find that the program's faculty and staff will assist them with supportive recommendations and helpful advice.

 

Global Politics and Religion Initiative (GPRI)

The Global Politics and Religion Initiative (GPRI) at SAIS promotes the study of religion and international affairs. Supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, the initiative has three main components that incorporate the study of the interaction between religion and politics into the school’s existing academic programs—new master’s degree courses, research seminars and executive education training sessions. GPRI’s goal is to foster an appreciation and deeper understanding of religion and international affairs among students, scholars and practitioners who will shape and influence future policymaking. Charles Doran, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of International Relations and Global Theory and History Program director, is co-directing the initiative with Jocelyne Cesari and Leila Austin. Cesari serves as a senior visiting professor of international relations in the Global Theory and History Program. She is also director of Harvard University’s Islam in the West Program. Austin is a professorial lecturer in the Global Theory and History and Middle East Studies programs and is deputy director of SAIS Cultural Conversations.

Learn more about the Global Politics and Religion Initiative.

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

Program Activities: Europe

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events

There will be a meeting with the Global Theoy and History students on Tuesday, September 10th at 12:30 in Nitze 507.



2014

  1. Neil Shenai Dissertation Defense 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM May8

    Neil Shenai, a Ph.D. candidate, will defend his dissertation. Note: This event is off the record.

  2. Hindu Pluralism from its Ancient Flourishing to its Contemporary Challenges 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM May2

    Wendy Doniger, Mircea Eliade Distinguished Service Professor of the History of Religions at the University of Chicago, will discuss this topic. Note: Lunch will be served at 12:00 p.m.

  3. A Conversation with Usman Bugaje 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM Apr8

    Usman Bugaje, researcher and policy analyst at the National Development Project, will give a talk.


  4. Unfinished Transition: Islam, Plurality, and Democracy in Indonesia 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Mar31

    Bob Hefner, professor of anthropology and director of the Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University, will discuss this topic.

  5. Religion, Conflict, and Political Activism in Central Nigeria 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM Mar4

    Adam Higazi, lecturer in African politics and history at the Centre of African Studies at the University of Cambridge; Darren Kew, executive director of the Center for Peace, Democracy, and Development at the University of Massachusetts Boston’s McCormack Graduate School; Charles Doran, director of the Canadian Studies Program; and Leila Austin, professorial lecturer in the Global Theory and History Program and the Middle East Studies Program, will discuss this topic.

2013

  1. Communities of Faith as Partners in Conflict Stabilization 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Dec6

    Jerry White, deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations, will discuss this topic.

  2. When God Means War, When God Means Peace: Explaining the Wild Variation in Religious Politics 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM Apr9

    Daniel Philpott, associate professor of political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame, will discuss this topic. Note: Lunch will be served.

  3. Invisible Entanglements: Language, Religion and Politics 12:00 PM - 2:30 PM Apr5

    Niloofar Haeri, professor and department chair of anthropology at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss this topic. 

  4. Economic Relations Between U.S. and Canada: A Positive Note 8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Apr1

    Robert Griffiths, U.S. consul general in Shanghai, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is open to students only, and the speaker’s comments will be off the record.

  5. Forging the Future 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Mar26

    Note: The time for this event has been changed to 12:30 p.m. rather than 12:00 p.m. as previously listed. 

    Jean-Paul Paloméros, NATO supreme allied commander transformation, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will also host a live webcast available here at the time of the event. Members of the media who plan to cover the event should respond to Felisa Neuringer Klubes at the SAIS Communications Office at 202.663.5626 or fklubes@jhu.edu.
     

Research

Our Alumni

External Resources

Contact Us

Charles Doran
Andrew W. Mellon Professor of International Relations, Director of the Global Theory and History Program, Director of the Center for Canadian Studies

cfdoran@jhu.edu
Nitze 510

Starr Lee
Program Coordinator

starr.lee@jhu.edu
202.663.5714

Address & Phone

Global Theory and History
Nitze Building
1740 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20036
  • 202.663.5714