Energy, Resources and Environment

Energy, Resources and Environment Program

Understanding the "iron triangle" of energy, water and food security, the threats posed by global climate change, and identifying solutions, is a critical component of the ERE graduate's tool kit.

Energy, Resources and Environment

An understanding of the "iron triangle" of energy, water and food security, the threats posed by global climate change, and possible solutions to these daunting problems, is a critical component of the ERE graduate's tool kit.

Energy, Resources and Environment

An understanding of the "iron triangle" of energy, water and food security, the threats posed by global climate change, and possible solutions to these daunting problems, is a critical component of the ERE graduate's tool kit.

The Energy, Resources and Environment (ERE) Program of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies is an interdisciplinary graduate program focused on developing innovative solutions to urgent global energy and environmental challenges. The Program aspires to educate a new generation who will play leadership roles in the diverse array of global, national and local institutions that will shape the world's future. ERE faculty provide students with the intellectual framework and analytic skills to devise robust solutions to the daunting policy, financing, technological and governance challenges facing the international community. A critical component of our curriculum in the Energy, Resources and Environment program is requiring that students take both energy and environment courses. This is consistent with our vision for the program, and means that no one can graduate as an ERE concentrator without being knowledgeable about the deep links between these two subject areas. An understanding of the "iron triangle" of energy, water and food security, the threats posed by global climate change, and possible solutions to these daunting problems, is a critical component of the ERE graduate's tool kit.

The Energy, Resources and Environment Program (ERE) has become one of the largest programs at SAIS. We are delighted with its progress and continuing popularity. Its growth is a reflection of the continuing hard work of its faculty, students, and staff as well as a number of key supporters. We are grateful for the generosity of the organizations and individuals who have helped to build our program. For a more complete overview of ERE, and to find out how to support the program, please check out our Prospectus

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Curriculum

 

Energy, Resources and Environment | M.A. Requirements

Energy, Resources and Environment Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

ENERGY, RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT (ERE)

Students concentrating in Energy, Resources and Environment (ERE) must take at least 6 courses within this program.* At minimum, 1 must be designated as an “Energy” course with the prefix SA.680.XXX and 1 must be designated as an “Environment” course with the prefix SA.680.XXX (refer to the ERE Matrix). Only 2 of the 6 required ERE courses may be cross-listed starting with a prefix other than SA.680.XXX. All students must pass the non-credit Online Basics of Energy course within the first three weeks of their entering term.

Students can consider choosing their curriculum based on Thematic Areas. These themes include a set of recommended courses that are geared toward students' career goals and academic interests. The sequencing of courses is encouraged, but not required.

*Entering 2014-2015 students have the option of choosing to follow the 2013-2014 requirements. In order to do so, students must contact Cristina Benitez by Monday, September 22, 2014.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. ERE concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.

 

CAPSTONE

Energy, Resources and Environment concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     Energy, Resources and Environment Oral Exam
2.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Curriculum

 

Energy, Resources and Environment | M.A. Requirements

Energy, Resources and Environment Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

ENERGY, RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT (ERE)

Students concentrating in Energy, Resources and Environment (ERE) must take at least 6 courses within this program.* At minimum, 1 must be designated as an “Energy” course with the prefix SA.680.XXX and 1 must be designated as an “Environment” course with the prefix SA.680.XXX (refer to the ERE Matrix). Only 2 of the 6 required ERE courses may be cross-listed starting with a prefix other than SA.680.XXX. All students must pass the non-credit Online Basics of Energy course within the first three weeks of their entering term.

Students can consider choosing their curriculum based on Thematic Areas. These themes include a set of recommended courses that are geared toward students' career goals and academic interests. The sequencing of courses is encouraged, but not required.

*Entering 2014-2015 students have the option of choosing to follow the 2013-2014 requirements. In order to do so, students must contact Cristina Benitez by Monday, September 22, 2014.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. ERE concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.

 

CAPSTONE

Energy, Resources and Environment concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     Energy, Resources and Environment Oral Exam
2.     MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Waiver Exams

Faculty

  • A

  • Robert
    Alvarez
    Professorial Lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • B

  • John
    P.
    Banks
    Professorial Lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • Deborah
    Bleviss
    B.S.
    Acting Director of the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • William
    Boone
    Bonvillian
    Professorial Lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • C

  • Kent
    E.
    Calder
    Ph.D.
    Director of Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies, Director and Professor of Japan Studies, Acting Director of Korean Studies
    Washington, D.C.
  • Celeste
    Connors
    Associate Practitioner in Residence in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • D

  • Marco
    Dell'Aquila
    Adjunct Professor of Energy, Resources and Environment
    Bologna, Italy
  • Charles
    F.
    Doran
    Ph.D.
    Andrew W. Mellon Professor of International Relations
    Washington, D.C.
  • Carol
    Dumaine
    Professorial Lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.
  • E

  • Heather
    E.
    Eves
    Professorial Lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program
    Washington, D.C.

Pages

Featured Courses

The ERE program provides its students both an academic and academic enrichment focus. Currently, the program offers a MA degree only. We also accept applications for M.I.P.P. candidates to affiliate with ERE. In AY14-15, all ERE students may choose between completing AY13-14 requirements or new AY14-15 requirements. Check http://isis.jhu.edu/classes for a full list of courses & descriptions. All courses are subject to change.

New MA Concentration Requirements (AY14-15): All students must successfully complete a prerequisite course, Online Basics of Energy, within the first three weeks of their first term. Students must complete at least six courses for credit within the program—two courses may be cross-listed. Four courses must have an ERE course number (SA.680.XXX). At minimum, one (680.XXX) course must be designated as an “Energy" course, and one (680.XXX) course must be designated as an “Environment” course. 

“Old” MA Concentration Requirements (AY13-14): All students must successfully complete the Online Basics of Energy course within the first three weeks of their first term. Students must take at least four courses within the program (only one course may be cross-listed and three must have an ERE course number 680.XXX) and two IR courses from two different IR fields (IR course may only count toward ERE OR IR requirement, not both. IR Fields: Conflict Mgmt-640.XXX, Global Theory & History -600.XXX, I’tl Law -650.XXX, OR Strategic Studies 660.XXX). At minimum, one (680.XXX) course must be designated as an “Energy" course, and one (680.XXX) course must be designated as an “Environment” course.

MIPP Affiliation Requirements: Students must take 3 courses (680.XXX). All students must successfully complete the Online Basics of Energy course.

  1. Fall 2014

    Global Energy Fundamentals (Blended Learning Format)

    This course is an essential element in meeting the goals...

  2. Fall 2014

    Global Environment Fundamentals

    This course is the complement to the Global Energy Fundamentals...

  3. Fall 2014

    International Energy & Environmental Policy - Rethinking Multilateral Engagement

    This course will provide an overview of the emerging trends...

  4. Fall 2014

    Introduction to Climate Change: Mitigation & Adaptation

    The purpose of this course is to explore solutions to...

  5. Fall 2014

    International Wildlife Conservation

    This course provides an overview of the theory and practice...

  6. Fall 2014

    Public-Private Partnerships: ERE Case Studies

    This course will focus on a selection of ERE case...

Program Activities

 

International Energy and Environment Practicum

The Practicum is an innovative program that allows students to combine a for-credit course at SAIS with extensive, in-depth, real world experience consulting for client organizations on projects aimed at addressing international environmental and energy policy challenges. The Practicum is designed to provide quality research and analysis on intractable challenges to clients, while providing students with the opportunity to apply concepts learned in the classroom to critical problems. Where possible, the work is integrated into the on-going research of an ERE faculty member.

Learn more about the International Energy and Environment Practicum.

 

Global Leaders Forum

The Global Leaders Forum is a speaker series that brings together leaders from the public sector, research, finance and industry throughout the academic year to explore solutions to key domestic and international energy and environmental challenges. The GLF serves as a platform for policymakers and executives to share their expertise and insight with SAIS faculty and students and the broader academic, business and media communities. Our invitations are sent to professionals from the energy and environment sectors in the Washington D.C. area as well as the SAIS student and faculty body and SAIS alumni. Typically a diverse audience of approximately 100-150 - including students, professionals and faculty - attend Global Leaders Forum events.

Learn more about the Global Leaders Forum.

 

Frontiers in Energy, Science and Technology (FEST)

To supplement its rigorous academic curriculum, the Energy, Resources and Environment Program also developed the Frontiers in Energy, Science and Technology (FEST) Field Visits initiative to provide its students with first-hand experience visiting utility, nuclear power and LNG plants, hydraulic fracturing and off-shore oil facilities, sewage treatment plants, and solar panel manufacturing facilities, among others. FEST offers student enrichment activities designed to provide first-hand exposure to innovations in the energy and environment sectors.

Learn more about Frontiers in Energy, Science and Technology (FEST).

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

Program Activities: Europe

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events



2014

  1. The Transformation of the Electric Utility Business 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Nov19

    Richard Caperton, director of national policy and partnerships at Opower, and John Banks, professorial lecturer in the Energy, Resources and Environment Program, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is not for attribution. Note: There will be a live webcast of this event.

  2. Food is a Privilege...Not a Right 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Nov17

    A.G. Kawamura, former secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, will discuss this topic as part of the SAIS Global Issues in Agriculture Speaker Series.

  3. Energy, Resources, and Environment Program Alumni Happy Hour 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Nov13

    SAIS students and alumni in energy and environment careers are invited to a happy hour. Note: This event will take place at The James Hoban Bar, located at 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, DC, 20036. Note: This event is not for attribution.

  4. Reducing US Greenhouse Gases: The EPA Clean Power Proposal and the Role of the States 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM Nov13

    Reid Harvey, director of the Clean Air Markets Division in the Office of Atmospheric Programs at the US Environmental Protection Agency; Michael Dowd, director of the Air Division for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; Diane Franks, manager of the Air Quality Planning Program at the Maryland Department of Environment; and David Doniger, director of the Climate and Clean Air Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, will discuss this topic as part of the Energy, Resources, and Environment Program Global Leaders Forum.

  5. Public - Sector Agricultural Research Priorities For Sustainable Food Security 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct28

    Gerald Nelson, professor emeritus at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, will discuss this topic.

  6. Food Security and Government Dysfunction: Can Progress Be Made in the Current Environment? 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Oct27

    Dan Glickman, senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center and former US Secretary of Agriculture, will discuss this topic.

  7. The New Kings of Crude: China, Oil, and Civil War in Sudan and South Sudan 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Oct20

    Luke Patey, senior researcher at the Dan­ish Insti­tute for Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, will discuss his book The New Kings of Crude: China, India, and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan and this topic. Note: This event will have a live webcast.

  8. A Model for Wildlife Conservation in Africa: The Cheetah Conservation Fund 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM Oct14

    Laurie Marker, founder and executive director of The Cheetah Conservation Fund; Bruce Brewer, general manager of The Cheetah Conservation Fund, and Heather Eves, professorial lecturer in the Energy, Resources, and Environment Program, will discuss this topic.

  9. Improving Agriculture and Land Use in the New Climate Economy 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct8

    Chris Delgado, senior fellow and coordinator of the land use topic of the New Climate Economy Project at the World Resources Institute, will discuss this topic.

  10. Fracking: Technology, Impacts and Regulation 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM Oct2

    Chris Faulkner, CEO of Breitling Energy; Amy Mall, senior analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council; and Jan Mares, senior advisor at Resources for the Future, will discuss this topic. Note: There will be a live webcast of this event.

Research

  1. ONGOING

    Faculty Research Initiatives

    To successfully develop solutions to complex and critical energy and environmental problems, the ERE program embraces a vision that unprecedented and multi-faceted innovation will be required, in many cases involving new public-private partnerships, to undertake technology development, deliver the needed investment, create the appropriate policy environment, establish an appropriate governance framework and succeed in international diplomacy.  This vision is borne out both in ERE classes and in the research work conducted by ERE faculty.

    Learn more about Faculty Research.
     
     

  2. ONGOING

    Faculty Publications

    Bleviss, Deborah, co-author A New Role for UNFCCC: The Matchmaker of Global Climate Governance (published in 2011)
    Bleviss, Deborah, lead author of the transportation mitigation chapter in Second Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (published in 1995)
    Bleviss, Deborah,  Author, The New Oil Crisis and Fuel Economy Technologies: Preparing the Light Transportation Industry for the 1990s (published in 1988)
     
    Haskett, J.D., and P. Gutman, 2010. Taking stock of the Global Environment Facility experience with payments for environmental services projects. in Tacconi L., Mahanty S., Suich H. eds. ‘Livelihoods in the REDD?: Payments for Environmental Services, Forest Conservation and Climate Change’. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham.
    Haskett, J.D., B. Schlamadinger and S. Brown, 2009. Land-based carbon storage and the European union emissions trading scheme: the science underlying the policy. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Climate Change, Vol. 15(2) pp. 127-136.
    Haskett J.D., 2005. Experiencias en la Introducción y Promoción de la Inoculación con Rhizobium para Mejorar la Productividad de las Leguminosas en la Región Central Interandina del Ecuador. In: G. Bernal and V. Diego eds. La Fijación Biológica de Nitrógeno: Un proceso clave en la agricultura sostenible en el Ecuador. ANCUPA, Quito, Ecuador.
    Haskett, J.D., Y.A. Pachepsky, B. Acock. 1997. Increase of C02 and climate change effects on Iowa soybean yield, simulated using GLYCIM. Agronomy J. 89: 167-176.
    Haskett, J.D. 1995. The Philosophical Basis of Soil Classification and its Evolution. Soil Sci. Soc. Am J., 59:179-184.
     
    Jhirad, David J. and Sharan, Hari, “Smart Power for Environmentally-sound Economic Development: An Agenda for Action”. Rockefeller Foundation 2011
    Jhirad, David J., “Smart Cities, Smart Financing” in Green Leadership Handbook, published by the Danish Industries Association, Copenhagen 2011
    Jhirad, David J., Nitze, William A., Lorenz Gollwitzer, “Oil in the 21st Century: Responding to New Drivers of Change” in The Oil Era: Emerging Challenges, The Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research, Abu Dhabi 2011
    Jhirad, David J., “Smart Energy Globalization”, in Proceedings of the Columbia University Conference, “Engaging the Sovereign Wealth Funds: Toward a Sustainable Capitalism”, Columbia University Press 2011
    Jhirad, David J.,  “Power to the People”, pp. 38-40 in SAISPHERE, Published by the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University, Washington, DC 2010.
     
    Keller, Kenneth H., "From Here to There in Information Technology," in American Behavioral Scientist (2008).
    Keller, Kenneth H., "Nanotechnology and Society" in Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2007).
    Keller, Kenneth H., "Improving the Understanding of Science and Technology," in Technology in Society (2006).
     
    Kohl, W.L., author, “Outlook for Nuclear Power Revival After Fukushima,”  USAEE Dialogue, Vol. 20, No. 1 (2012)
    Kohl, W.L., author, “Consumer Country Energy Cooperation: The IEA and the Global Energy Order” in A. Goldthau and J.M. Witte, Global Energy Governance: The New Rules of the Game (Brookings, 2010).
     
    Kong, Bo. China’s International Petroleum Policy (Santa Barbra, California: Praeger Security International, 2010)
    Kong, Bo. “Governing China’s Energy in the Context of Global Governance,” Global Policy, Volume 2, Special Issue, September 2011, pp.51-65.
    Kong, Bo. “The Geopolitics of the Myanmar-China Oil and Gas Pipelines,” NBR Special Report #23, PP.55-65 (Seattle, Washington: The National Bureau of Asian Research, September 2010)
    Kong, Bo. Book Reviews: Oil in China: From Self-Reliance to Internationalization & Oil and Gas in China: The New Energy Superpower's Relations with its Region. Lim Tai Wei. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing, 2009. The China Quarterly, Volume 23, pp.731-733.
    Kong, Bo. “An Anatomy of China’s Energy Insecurity and Its Strategies.” Seattle, Washington: Pacific Northwest Center for Global Security, 2005.
     
    Thompson, R.L. “Global Agriculture: Gaining Ground?” in SAISphere 2011-2012--Growth Ahead for Global Agriculture. (Washington, DC: Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, 2012), pp.8-11. Download from:http://media.sais-jhu.edu/saisphere/
    Thompson, R.L. “Globalization and Rural America,” Chicago Fed Letter, Essays on Issues,  number 239, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, June 2007, 4 pages. (http://www.chicagofed.org/publications/fedletter/cfljune2007_239.pdf)
    Thompson, R.L. “Globalization and the Benefits of Trade,” Chicago Fed Letter, Essays on Issues, number 236, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, March 2007, 4 pages. (http://www.chicagofed.org/publications/fedletter/cflmarch2007_236.pdf).
    Thompson, R.L. ‘The Doha Round Suspension: The Role of US Politics,” Bridges Monthly, year 10, no. 5, August 2006, pp. 15-17. (http://www.ictsd.org/monthly/bridges/BRIDGES10-5.pdf).
    Thompson, R.L. “The US Farm Bill and the Doha Negotiations: On Parallel Tracks or a Collision Course?” Policy Brief No. 15, International Food and Agricultural trade Policy Council, Washington, DC, September 2005, 20 pages. (http://www.agritrade.org/Publications/IBs/329701.pdf).
     
    Vajjhala, S.P. and Walker, W.M. (2010). Roads to Participatory Planning: Integrating Cognitive Mapping and GIS for Transport Prioritization in Rural Lesotho, Journal of Maps: Special Issue on Cognitive Mapping and Participatory Research. v2010: 488-504. 10.4113/jom.2010.1086.
    Wilson, E.J., M. Granger Morgan, J. Apt, M. Bonner, C. Bunting, M. de Figueiredo, J. Gode, C. Jaeger, D. Keith, S. McCoy, R. S. Haszeldine, M. Pollak, D. Reiner, E. Rubin, A. Torvanger, C. Ulardic, S. Vajjhala, D. Victor, I. Wright (2008). Regulating the Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. Environmental Science & Technology 42(8): 2718–2722.
    Vajjhala, S. P. and P. S. Fischbeck (2007). Quantifying Siting Difficulty: A Case Study of U.S. Transmission Line Siting. Energy Policy 35(1): 650-671.

Our Alumni

 

The driving force of our mission has always been the zeal and excellence of our students.

Whether you are a recent graduate or one of the trail-blazing students whose passion helped start the program (formerly the International Policy Program) at SAIS, we wish to hear from you! 

We welcome alumni to engage and participate in upcoming ERE events. Connect with us in person and online:

 

We also encourage you to connect with the SAIS Energy and Environment Alumni Network group on Linkedin and with current student leaders of the SAIS Energy and Environment Club (EEC)

Support the Energy, Resources and Environment Program 

 

External Resources

Contact Us

Deborah Bleviss
Acting Director

dbleviss@jhu.edu
202.663.5761
Bernstein-Offit Building
1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, 746
Washington, DC 20036

Jonathan Haskett
Associate Director

jhasket1@jhu.edu
202-663-5645
Bernstein-Offit Building
1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, 742
Washington, DC 20036

Cristina Benitez
Academic Program Manager

sbenite1@jhu.edu
202.663.5786
Bernstein-Offit Building
1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, 743
Washington, DC 20036

Address & Phone

Energy, Resources and Environment
Bernstein-Offit Building
1717 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20036
  • 202.663.5786
  • 202.249.7306