European and Eurasian Studies

Western Europe

Study trips to destinations like London, Brussels, and Sarajevo offer the opportunity to visit institutions and employers across Europe.

Russia and Eurasia

The program equips concentrators to analyze what is happening in contemporary Europe and Eurasia, including Russia, and to understand the region's role in the world.

Central and Eastern Europe

Concentrators analyze the trends, events, and ideas that have shaped today's Europe and Eurasia.

Students engage in the study of modern European and Eurasian history, political economy and current affairs. The program equips concentrators to analyze not only what is happening in the European Union and its member states, but also on other nations in Eastern Europe and Eurasia, including Russia, the Caucasus, and Central Asia and to understand the region's role in the world. 

An overview of the EES program from Director Erik Jones. 

Students may begin the EES program in either Bologna or Washington DC. The program differs from other concentrations at SAIS because it does not have any required coursework. Students work with their program advisor and members of the senior faculty to design a course of study to prepare for three comprehensive exams that must be completed to meet the degree requirements. At the end of the two years, EES concentrators have a ‘capstone’ oral examination with members of the senior faculty.

Upcoming Events

  1. Does the Russian Economy Have a Future? 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Nov5
  2. Europe's Lost Decade and Its Strategic Consequences 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Nov11

Recent Photos & Video

Curriculum

 

EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES | M.A. Requirements

European and Eurasian Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015                                       
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES

Students concentrating in European and Eurasian Studies (EES) design their own program of study to achieve fixed learning outcomes as set out in the program syllabus. These learning outcomes are evaluated in three comprehensive exams. The program does not have any required courses. Candidates work with their program adviser and senior faculty to plan courses and independent readings that will prepare them for the comprehensive exams.
 
Track
 
Russia and Eurasia Track: Students who choose the Russia and Eurasia track within the concentration complete Comp III in this area and must achieve Russian language for proficiency.
 
Comprehensive Examinations
 
Comprehensive exams are given three to four times per year on both campuses and are graded as pass/fail. Exams may be taken multiple times without penalty. The European and Eurasian Studies comprehensive exams are based on the EES syllabus which sets out the topics and offers a bibliography for each written exam.
 
Comp I: Modern European History and Ideas
The purpose of this examination is to expose EES concentrators to a broad interpretative framework for understanding the formation and evolution of the international systems of states. Students without a strong background in European history should take or audit the specialized history core course, Evolution of the International System. Students usually take this exam after their first or second semester, depending on their campus of study.
 
Comp II: European Political Economies
The purpose of this examination is to make sure that students understand the essentials of governance – including economic governance – across the region. This exam encompasses the domestic political economies of the four major Western European nation states, the European Union and European integration generally, the problems of transition in Central and Eastern Europe—including Russia, and Europe’s relations with the U.S. and global economies.  Candidates take this exam before or after their third semester.
 
Comp III: Europe and the World Since 1945
This comprehensive examination covers the relationship between European countries and the outside world. That relationship is both country-specific and regional. This exam has three different elements. The first concerns the international political economy, which is arguably where Europe is most influential. The second looks at the regional dimension of Europe’s relations with the outside world, and draws on the history of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as the European Union. The third focuses on the comparative foreign policies of European countries. Students usually take Comp III at the end of their third of forth semester.
 
Or
 
Comp III: Russian and Eurasian Studies
This comprehensive exam is designed for students in the Russia and Eurasia track. It covers the rise and fall of communism in Russia and Eurasia and allows students to focus on two of the following sub-areas: Post-Communist Politics, Post-Communist Economies, Post-Communist National Identities and Ethnic Relations, Post-Communist Civil Societies, and Post-Communist Foreign and Security Policies. Students usually take Comp III at the end of their third of fourth semester.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

European and Eurasian Studies concentrators do not need to take any core exams, but they must pass the three program comprehensive exams. EES concentrators substitute Comp I and Comp II for SAIS’s core exam requirements in Evolution of the International System and Comparative National Systems.

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

European and Eurasian Studies MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a modern European language. Students who select the Russia and Eurasia track must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in Russian. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS. Native speakers of a modern European language or Russian (if in the Russia and Eurasia track) must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English. Those students are encouraged to study another modern European language.

 

CAPSTONE

European and Eurasian Studies concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     European and Eurasian Studies Oral Exam. Candidates submit, in advance, a brief paper with a topic they are prepared to discuss. It should feature a contemporary issue in the region, in light of its historical, institutional, political and economic settings. Participation in the non-credit current events seminar and at the various lectures on contemporary political and economic issues is a good way to prepare for the oral.
2.     M.A. Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible).

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR (European Studies)

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010 

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR (Russian and Eurasian Studies)

Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010
 

Curriculum

 

EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES | M.A. Requirements

European and Eurasian Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2014-2015                                       
 
Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES

Students concentrating in European and Eurasian Studies (EES) design their own program of study to achieve fixed learning outcomes as set out in the program syllabus. These learning outcomes are evaluated in three comprehensive exams. The program does not have any required courses. Candidates work with their program adviser and senior faculty to plan courses and independent readings that will prepare them for the comprehensive exams.
 
Track
 
Russia and Eurasia Track: Students who choose the Russia and Eurasia track within the concentration complete Comp III in this area and must achieve Russian language for proficiency.
 
Comprehensive Examinations
 
Comprehensive exams are given three to four times per year on both campuses and are graded as pass/fail. Exams may be taken multiple times without penalty. The European and Eurasian Studies comprehensive exams are based on the EES syllabus which sets out the topics and offers a bibliography for each written exam.
 
Comp I: Modern European History and Ideas
The purpose of this examination is to expose EES concentrators to a broad interpretative framework for understanding the formation and evolution of the international systems of states. Students without a strong background in European history should take or audit the specialized history core course, Evolution of the International System. Students usually take this exam after their first or second semester, depending on their campus of study.
 
Comp II: European Political Economies
The purpose of this examination is to make sure that students understand the essentials of governance – including economic governance – across the region. This exam encompasses the domestic political economies of the four major Western European nation states, the European Union and European integration generally, the problems of transition in Central and Eastern Europe—including Russia, and Europe’s relations with the U.S. and global economies.  Candidates take this exam before or after their third semester.
 
Comp III: Europe and the World Since 1945
This comprehensive examination covers the relationship between European countries and the outside world. That relationship is both country-specific and regional. This exam has three different elements. The first concerns the international political economy, which is arguably where Europe is most influential. The second looks at the regional dimension of Europe’s relations with the outside world, and draws on the history of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as the European Union. The third focuses on the comparative foreign policies of European countries. Students usually take Comp III at the end of their third of forth semester.
 
Or
 
Comp III: Russian and Eurasian Studies
This comprehensive exam is designed for students in the Russia and Eurasia track. It covers the rise and fall of communism in Russia and Eurasia and allows students to focus on two of the following sub-areas: Post-Communist Politics, Post-Communist Economies, Post-Communist National Identities and Ethnic Relations, Post-Communist Civil Societies, and Post-Communist Foreign and Security Policies. Students usually take Comp III at the end of their third of fourth semester.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

European and Eurasian Studies concentrators do not need to take any core exams, but they must pass the three program comprehensive exams. EES concentrators substitute Comp I and Comp II for SAIS’s core exam requirements in Evolution of the International System and Comparative National Systems.

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

European and Eurasian Studies MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a modern European language. Students who select the Russia and Eurasia track must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in Russian. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS. Native speakers of a modern European language or Russian (if in the Russia and Eurasia track) must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English. Those students are encouraged to study another modern European language.

 

CAPSTONE

European and Eurasian Studies concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:
 
1.     European and Eurasian Studies Oral Exam. Candidates submit, in advance, a brief paper with a topic they are prepared to discuss. It should feature a contemporary issue in the region, in light of its historical, institutional, political and economic settings. Participation in the non-credit current events seminar and at the various lectures on contemporary political and economic issues is a good way to prepare for the oral.
2.     M.A. Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible).

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR (European Studies)

Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010 

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR (Russian and Eurasian Studies)

Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010
 

Waiver Exams

Faculty

Pages

Featured Courses

Concentrators analyze the trends, events and ideas that have shaped today's Europe and Eurasia. They discover the essentials of governance, including economic governance, focusing on individual states as well as institutions of the European Union. The EES program is designed to ensure that concentrators have sufficient depth of knowledge in European and Eurasian Studies. Two of the comprehensive exams cover much the same material that you would find in the SAIS Core examinations on ‘Evolution of the International System’ and ‘Comparative National Systems’. Hence, by passing the comprehensive examinations, EES concentrators meet the SAIS core requirement. The EES program is also designed to enhance cross-cultural communication. All students must demonstrate proficiency in a modern European language. Once students achieve proficiency in one language, they are encouraged to deepen their knowledge through post-proficiency study or to broaden their exposure by taking up another language. The EES program encourages specialization. This can take place on an individual basis through participation in the European and Eurasian Research Seminar. It can also take place on a sub-regional basis by focusing attention on different parts of Europe. Within this framework, it is possible to follow a Russian and Eurasian Studies “track” and have this noted on your transcript. Students who choose this track will need to demonstrate proficiency in Russian.

  1. Fall 2014

    Ukraine, Belarus, & Moldova: Development & Security in Post-Soviet Eastern Europe

    Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova lie in a strategically important region...

  2. Fall 2014

    The EU and Its Instituions

    This course provides an introduction to the economic and political...

  3. Fall 2014

    EU Foreign Policy: Rethinking Europe in a Non-European World

    The first part of this course covers the evolution of...

  4. Spring 2014

    West European Political Economies

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to...

Program Activities

 

The "Third Country Experience"

Brussels, Bucharest or Bologna? Madrid, Milan or Moscow? London, Luxembourg, Warsaw or Zagreb?
Which of these cities will be your summer internship destination?
 
The unique SAIS model of providing a trans-Atlantic education means that students have the opportunity to study international relations first from a European perspective in Bologna and then from an American one in Washington D.C. One of the goals of the SAIS European and Eurasian Studies Program in particular is to provide a “third country experience” during the summer between the first and second years of the program, allowing concentrators to experience living and working in their region of study.
 
This year the program has secured over 40 internship positions across the region in policy research, public affairs consulting, international business development, financial and macroeconomic analysis, political movements and more. Opportunities are specifically designed for SAIS students and offer a content-rich experience with senior-level mentors.
 
Applications are open to SAIS MA, MAIA and MIPP candidates of all years and concentrations on all SAIS campuses. Priority is given to first-year students in the EES program, though graduating students interested in working in the region are also considered since summer “exit-internships” are often a way to get a foot on the vieux continent. All recruiting is done through the SAISworks system.
 
Questions may be directed to Kathryn Knowles, Associate Director of European and Eurasian Studies (kknowles@jhu.edu).

 

ACES Certificate in European Union Studies

The American Consortium on EU Studies (ACES) was created in 2001 to improve academic and public understanding of the European Union and U.S.-E.U. relations. It seeks to strengthen education and research opportunities and create new synergies among scholars, students, policymakers, the private sector, representatives of governmental and non-governmental organization and the media. The consortium is comprised of Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University, American University, Georgetown University, and George Mason University. 

ACES will confer a Certificate in European Union Studies to any graduate student enrolled in one of the member universities who completes 15 credits (the equivalent of five semester-long classes) of EU-relevant course work at any of these institutions. It is expected that the students who get the Certificate will be simultaneously fulfilling requirements for MA or PhD programs at their home university. 

SAIS MA candidates from all concentration areas may qualify for the ACES certificate if they take 5 full-credit courses in the European and Eurasian Studies concentration or otherwise approved by the European and Eurasian Studies Program. Click here for a list of eligible courses. Certificates may be requested on a rolling basis upon completion of the requirements. Interested students are invited to contact Associate Director of European and Eurasian Studies Kathryn Knowles (kknowles@jhu.edu) or Program Coordinator Lindsey Love (lohmit@jhu.edu). 

 

European and Eurasian Research Seminar

Students in this seminar conducted between Bologna and Washington via video conference develop an original question and make a scholarly contribution to the field. M.A. and Ph.D. candidates learn research methods, analyze a current issue in the region and present their work during an authors’ workshop with program faculty

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

SAIS Washington EES Seminar Series

The Spring 2014 Seminar Series in Washington, DC was hosted by Jim Mann, Author-in-Residence, European and Eurasian Studies Program. 

Presentations included:

"Does the United States Still Care About Europe? A European View of American Policy" - H.E. Peter Taksoe-Jensen, Danish Ambassador to the United States

"Turkey Under Erdogan: A Conversation with Morton Abramowitz" - Morton Abramowitz, former Ambassador of the United States to Turkey

"The Ukraine Crisis" - Matthew Rojansky, Director, Kennan Institute, the Wilson Center; Adjunct Professor of European & Eurasian Studies, SAIS

"New Opportunities for the U.S.-French Partnership" - H.E. Francois Dellatre, French Ambassador to the United States

"Russia and the West in Crisis" - Hannes Adomeit, scholar on EU-Russia Relations, former Professor, the College of Europe

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Fall 2013 Seminar Series in Washington, DC was hosted by Professor Dana Allin, in conjunction with the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). 

Presentations included:

"The Transatlantic Public Mood: Views on Global Trends, Security, and the Economic Crisis" - Stephen F. Szabo, Executive Director, The Transatlantic Academy & Dana Allin, Senior Fellow, IISS; Editor, Survival; Adjunct Professor of European Studies

"The Syria Crisis" -Steve Simon, Executive Director, IISS-US; Corresponding Director, IISS-Middle East; former Senior Director, Middle East & North Africa, US National Security Council Staff

"Avoiding Catastrophic Climate Change: A Transatlantic Project" - Jeffrey Mazo, Research Fellow for Environmental Security and Science Policy, IISS

"Can the EU Make a Comeback? Prospects and Pitfalls" - Charles Kupchan, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Professor of International Affairs, Georgetown University

"Points of Legal Controversy: The Transatlantic Allies and the Fight Against Al-Qaeda" - Rebecca Ingber, Associate Research Scholar, Columbia Law School 

"How to Turn Russia Against Assad" - Samuel Charap, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, IISS and Jeremy Shapiro, Visiting Fellow, Foreign Policy, Brookings Institution


Russia/Eurasia Forum

The Russia/Eurasia Forum meets bi-weekly and is hosted by Professor Bruce Parrott. Experts from around the Washington, DC area give presentations on topics ranging from Religion in Contemporary Russian Politics, the Global Revolution in Natural Gas, to the changing relationship between Europe and Russia. 

The Spring 2014 semester will feature the following presentations:

"Trying to Shut Pandora's Box: Putin's Policy Toward Syria and Iran" - Mark N. Katz, Professor of Government and Politics, George Mason University

"US-Russian Relations After the Ukraine Crisis" - Angela Stent, Professor of Government and Foreign Service, Director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies, Georgetown University

"Crimes Against Humanity: Pollution and Public Health in Russia Today" - Sally Stoecker, Visiting Scholar, European and Eurasian Studies Program, Johns Hopkins SAIS

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Fall 2013 semester featured the following presentations:

"Dangerous Liasons: Religion in Contemporary Russian Politics" - Alicja Curanovic, Assistant Professor, Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw

"The China-Russia Reversal: The Global Economy in the 21st Century" - Harley Balzer, Associate Professor of Government and International Affairs, Associate Faculty Member of the Department of History, Georgetown University 

"The Global Revolution in Natural Gas: How it will change your life, and what it means for Russia and the United States" - Thane Gustafson, Professor of Government, Georgetown University; Senior Director of IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates

"Economics, Energy, and Political Evolution: Understanding why Europe's relationship with Russia is Changing (Fast)" - Heather Conley, Senior Fellow and Director, Europe Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

"Russia and Its Neighbors: Does the Post-Soviet Space still exist?" - Jeffrey Mankoff, Deputy Director and Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies



Current Events Seminar

Students have the opportunity to gather at this informal seminar led by Professor Charles Gati, and discuss current events in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. The seminar also provides students with the opportunity to present current research and receive feedback from both faculty and their peers. 

 

Program Activities: Europe

Bologna Institute for Policy Research (BIPR)

The Bologna Institute for Policy Research (BIPR) is the research division of the Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe.
The BIPR promotes problem-centered, interdisciplinary research in international policy, drawing upon the global network of scholars of the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the comparative advantage of SAIS Europe as a transatlantic institution for research and teaching with close to sixty years of experience. Its mission is to share the work of scholars and practitioners associated with SAIS Europe with the wider policy community, providing a pivotal forum for thought and debate in international public policy. The institute works with a team of student research assistants each year to make summary content and three-question video interviews from the SAIS Europe seminar series available online.
The BIPR is directed by Erik Jones, Director of SAIS European and Eurasian Studies and Professor of European Studies.



SAIS Europe EES Seminar Series

The EES Series in Bologna is hosted by Professors Masha Hedberg and Erik Jones.  

"Roundtable on the European Parliamentary Elections" - George Dimitrakopoulos, Former Member (1994-2009) and 2nd Vice President of the European Parliament; Francisco Torres, Santander Visiting Fellow, St. Antony's College, Oxford, UK; and Lousewies van der Laan, Vice President, Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE) and Independent Political Advisor on Democracy, International Justice, and Human Rights, The Netherlands 

"Weapons of the Meek: How Churches Influence Democratic Policy" - Anna Gryzmala-Busse, Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, Department of Political Science and Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies and the Weiser Center for Europe, University of Michigan

"North Caucasus Female Suicide Bombers: Organization Behind Despair" - Nabi Abdullaev, Head of the Foreign Langugage News Service, RIA Novosti 

"The Crisis in the Euro Area: the Challenges of Integration and Disintegration" - Daniela Schwarzer, Head, Division of European Integration, German Institute for International and Security Affairs - Stiftun Wissenschaft und Politik

"Democracy and Its Discontents in Central Europe" - Professor Charles Gati, Professorial Lecturer and Senior Fellow, European and Eurasian Studies Program, SAIS




 

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events



2014

  1. Does the Russian Economy Have a Future? 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Nov5

    Anders Aslund, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, will discuss this topic.

  2. Europe's Lost Decade and Its Strategic Consequences 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Nov11

    Thomas Wright, fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution, will discuss the topic.

  3. European and Eurasian Studies Program Current Events Seminar 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Nov12

    The European and Eurasian Studies Program will host its bi-weekly current events seminar. Note: This event is off the record.

2014

  1. European and Eurasian Studies Program Current Events Seminar 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct29

    The European and Eurasian Studies Program will host its bi-weekly current events seminar. Note: This event is off the record.

  2. Russia/Eurasia Forum: Maxim Trudolyubov 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct22

    Maxim Trudolyubov, contributing opinion writer for the International New York Times and visiting fellow at the Wilson Center, will discuss this topic.

     

  3. Film Screening: A Fight Against Camorra in the Land of Fires 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct16

    Marco La Gala, director of Nella Terra Dei Fuochi, will discuss the film on organized crime in the south of Italy and the brave initiatives of the State and common citizens who confront it, during the film screening. Note: This film will have English subtitles.

  4. European and Eurasian Studies Program Current Events Seminar 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct15

    The European and Eurasian Studies Program will host its bi-weekly current events seminar. Note: This event is off the record.

  5. The Edge of Empire: The Truman Administration and the Question of Rearmament, January-June 1950 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Oct14

    John Harper, professor of american foreign policy at SAIS Europe, will discuss this topic.

  6. Is Europe in Decline? Publication Workshop 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM Oct11

    SAIS professors and alumni will discuss various chapters of their planned work for an upcoming publication on this topic. Note: This event is off the record.

  7. Is Europe in Decline? Publication Workshop 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM Oct10

    SAIS professors and alumni will discuss various chapters of their planned work for an upcoming publication on this topic. Note: This event is off the record.

  8. Where is the Putin Regime Headed? 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct8

    Henry Hale, associate professor of political science and international affairs and co-director of the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia at George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, will discuss this topic.

  9. How to Avoid a New Cold War 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Oct7

    Samuel Charap, senior fellow for Russia and Eurasia at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, will discuss this topic.

  10. European and Eurasian Studies Program Current Events Seminar 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM Oct1

    The European and Eurasian Studies Program will host its bi-weekly current events seminar. Note: This event is off the record.

Research

  1. Aug 7, 2014

    "The Mask is Off"

    Senior Research Professor Charles Gati on how Viktor Orban has openly renounced Western-style democracy for the nationalist authoritarianism of Putin's Russia.

  2. Aug 7, 2014

    "Corporate Raiding in Ukraine: Causes, Methods, and Consequences" 

    Adjunct Professor Matthew Rojansky's field research in Ukraine sheds light on the history, causes and methodologies of corporate raiding, as well as on the costs and consequences of raiding for Ukraine's further development.

    Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Volume 22, Number 3 / Summer 2014

    Abstract: Corporate raiding in Ukraine is a widely discussed and reported problem that severely damages investment and economic development, prospects for European integration, and the welfare of ordinary people. Yet the phenomenon of raiding itself is only poorly understood, often either dismissed as inseparable from the country's broader problem of endemic corruption, or imputed to powerful and shadowy raiders thought to be immune from defensive measures by private businesses. The author's field research in Ukraine sheds light on the history, causes and methodologies of raiding, as well as on the costs and consequences of raiding for Ukraine's further development.

     

  3. Aug 3, 2014

    "EU Sanctions Against Russia Are a Double Edged Sword"

    EES Director Erik Jones discusses how the financial elements of the European Union's "third stage" sanctions will affect the Russian economy.

  4. Jul 19, 2014

    "Politicians Have a Responsibility to Smooth the Rough Edges of Capitalism" (in Slovene)

    EES Director Erik Jones is interviewed by Slovene online newspaper Delo and comments that Europe has been more active than many are willing to admit.

  5. May 29, 2014

    "Con Farage vince Little England" (in Italian)

    Senior Adjunct Professor David W. Ellwood comments on the electoral success of the UK Independence Party, which received 27.5% of the vote in the recent European elections.

  6. Apr 20, 2014

    "New Turkey and Its Paradox" (Part Two)

    Adjunct Professor Omer Taspinar on the paradox of the "New Turkey" (originally published in Today's Zaman)

  7. Apr 13, 2014

    "New Turkey and Its Paradox" (Part One)

    Adjunct Professor Omer Taspinar on the paradox of the "New Turkey" (originally published in Today's Zaman)

  8. 2014

    The Oxford Handbook of the European Union

    Edited by Erik Jones, Anand Menon, Stephen Weatherill

    This is an authoritative, one-volume, and independent treatment of the history, functioning and nature of the European integration. Written by a selection of leading scholars, it covers the major institutions, policies, and events in the history of integration, whilst also providing a guide to the major theoretical approaches that have been used to study it over time. By bringing together such a distinguished cast covering such a wide array of themes, the Handbook is intended as a one stop shop for all those interested in the European Union and its predecessors. Written in an accessible style, the volume is intended to shape the discipline of EU studies, and to establish itself as the essential point of referencefor all those interested in European integration, both in universities and more broadly. It represents a timely guide to an institution that is much discussed but often only imperfectly understood. 

  9. 2014

    The Year the European Crisis Ended

    Erik Jones

    The European crisis came to an end when first political leaders and then the European Central Bank promised to do whatever it takes to safeguard the euro. Specifically they committed to creating a European banking union and to buy unlimited amounts of sovereign debt in distressed markets for governments that made a binding commitment to reform. Markets were initially skeptical and yet ultimately persuaded by the commitment of European elites. Events in Italy and Cyprus threatened to return Europe to crisis and yet were ultimately managed without major turmoil. Somewhere along the way, however, the desire of European elites to do whatever is necessary began to waver and their commitment to banking union diminished. The European crisis has ended but Europe is not yet resilient enough to ensure that it will not recur. 

  10. 2014

    Europe Today

    Edited by Ronald Tiersky and Erik Jones

    Now in its fifth edition, Europe Today presents unrivaled coverage of developments in major European countries anc across the region. Thoroughly revised and updated - with a new introduction and an added chapter on Spain - this is the only work that offers a sustained and unified set of both country case studies and thematic chapters on the European Union. Written by leading scholars from Europe and North America, the book offers a range of perspectives on the process of European integration, the evolution of economic performance, the spread of judicial authority, and the reaction to multiculturalism and immigration. Highlighting the impact of the global economic crisis and the struggle to assert Europe's voice more widely, the contributors provide a cosmopolitan and pragmatic assessment of what Europeans have accomplished and what challenges they continue to face. Each chapter builds on a foundation of basic political information and explanation to develop distinctive and thought-provoking contributions to current debates. A book that informs but also engages, this comprehensive text will lead readers toward a coherent and informed view of Europe today. 

    Contributions by: Gianfranco Baldini, Simon Duke, Eric S. Einhorn, Gregory W. Fuller, Gabriel Goodliffe, Roberta Haar, Jonathan Hopkin, Erik Jones, R. Daniel Kelemen, Serhiy Kudelia, Benedicta Marzinotto, Jonathon W. Moses, Bruce Parrott, Sebastián Royo, Kate Alexander Shaw, Ben Stanley, Ronald Tiersky, John Van Oudenaren, and Helga A. Welsh

  11. 2013

    A Resolute Faith in the Power of Reasonable Ideas

    Collection of papers from the conference in honor of David P. Calleo, 19-20 October 2012

    In October 2012 a group of friends, colleagues and former students gathered in Bologna, Italy to honor David P. Calleo for his accomplishments, partake of his wisdom and special company, and as the papers published here demonstrate, to reflect on and discuss his ideas. The title of the conference, and of this collection of papers, comes from a letter written by David, and captures something essential about his approach: a belief in the importance of the creative political imagination, a temperamental optimism, and an impatience with unreasonable ideas and clichés.

    David P. Calleo is Dean Acheson Professor of European Studies at SAIS and University Professor of the Johns Hopkins University. He entered Yale at age sixteen receiving his BA in 1955 and Ph.D. in 1959. He founded (in 1968) and directed (until 2012) the preeminent American graduate program for the study of contemporary Europe and shepherded some forty doctoral dissertations to their successful completion. SAIS European Studies (now European and Eurasian Studies) has formed hundreds of professionals working today in government, business, academia, and the press.

    Contributors: Dana H. Allin, Christopher Chivvis,  David Ellwood, Gabriel Goodliffe, John L. Harper, Pierre Hassner, Erik Jones, Matthias Matthijs, Gian Giacomo Migone, Thomas Row, Benjamin Rowland, Simon Serfaty, Michael Stürmer, Omer Taspinar

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Erik Jones
Director of European and Eurasian Studies and Professor of European Studies, Director of the Bologna Institute for Policy Research

ejones@jhubc.it
Based in Bologna, Italy



Kathryn Knowles
Associate Director

kknowles@jhu.edu
Based in Bologna, Italy

Lindsey Ohmit
Program Coordinator

lohmit@jhu.edu
Based in Washington, D.C.

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European and Eurasian Studies
Washington, DC:
1619 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Rome 519
Washington, DC 20036
202-663-5796

Bologna, Italy:
via Belmeloro 11
40126 Bologna, Italy
+39 051 291 7811