American Foreign Policy

American Foreign Policy Program

Join us for "US Foreign Policy in the Middle East" with Steven A. Cook and Robert M. Danin

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American Foreign Policy Program
Monday, October 28, 2013 Rome Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW. Washington, DC 20036 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
The American Foreign Policy Program prepares students to understand the history (particularly from the Spanish-American War to the present), culture (ideas, premises and perspectives), process and politics of America’s foreign relations and contemporary issues of American foreign policy.

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Curriculum

 

American Foreign Policy | M.A. Requirements

Entering Class 2013-2014

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

The following represent the overall goals and objectives for student learning in the American Foreign Policy concentration at SAIS. Attainment will be ascertained by student performance in courses and by formal and informal consultation with students, both during and after their years at SAIS.
 
1. Students should gain an understanding of the history of American foreign policy, starting with the founding of the country but with special emphasis on the decades since World War II. 
2. Students should become familiar with American foreign policy toward at least one other area of the world, and preferably two or three. 
3. Students should gain an understanding of how the American government -- including the Executive Branch and the Congress -- makes and carries out foreign policy. 
4. Students should gain an understanding of the major current issues confronting the United States, including those involving economics and those having to do with security. 
5. Most importantly, through the department-wide writing requirement as well as the writing requirements of particular courses, students should be able to express themselves in writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively.
 

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY

Students concentrating in American Foreign Policy (AFP) must take at least 5 courses within the field.
 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.
 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.
 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. American Foreign Policy concentrators must pass American Foreign Policy Since World War II as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations
 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.
 

CAPSTONE

American Foreign Policy concentrators must produce a major research paper on a subject approved by a full-time faculty member in the American Foreign Policy Program. This requirement is fulfilled by one of the following:
 
1.     Successful completion of the course, American Foreign Policy Thesis Seminar (SA.200.758)
2.     A paper produced through significant research in a regular course or through supervised independent research
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Curriculum

 

American Foreign Policy | M.A. Requirements

Entering Class 2013-2014

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 or 14 courses as approved by Academic Affairs.

The following represent the overall goals and objectives for student learning in the American Foreign Policy concentration at SAIS. Attainment will be ascertained by student performance in courses and by formal and informal consultation with students, both during and after their years at SAIS.
 
1. Students should gain an understanding of the history of American foreign policy, starting with the founding of the country but with special emphasis on the decades since World War II. 
2. Students should become familiar with American foreign policy toward at least one other area of the world, and preferably two or three. 
3. Students should gain an understanding of how the American government -- including the Executive Branch and the Congress -- makes and carries out foreign policy. 
4. Students should gain an understanding of the major current issues confronting the United States, including those involving economics and those having to do with security. 
5. Most importantly, through the department-wide writing requirement as well as the writing requirements of particular courses, students should be able to express themselves in writing clearly, concisely, and persuasively.
 

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY

Students concentrating in American Foreign Policy (AFP) must take at least 5 courses within the field.
 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.
 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.
 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses. American Foreign Policy concentrators must pass American Foreign Policy Since World War II as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations
 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at SAIS. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS, even if not using English for proficiency.
 

CAPSTONE

American Foreign Policy concentrators must produce a major research paper on a subject approved by a full-time faculty member in the American Foreign Policy Program. This requirement is fulfilled by one of the following:
 
1.     Successful completion of the course, American Foreign Policy Thesis Seminar (SA.200.758)
2.     A paper produced through significant research in a regular course or through supervised independent research
 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Waiver Exams

Faculty

Featured Courses

Program Activities

 

Faculty Book Panel Discussions

The American Foreign Policy Program regularly sponsors discussions of recently published books written by SAIS faculty.  

Research Opportunities

Small stipends are available for AFP-related research, at the director's discretion.  

Domestic Study Visits

The American Foreign Policy Program sponsors annual visits to the U.S. Congress and the U.S. Department of State.  

International Study Trips

The American Foreign Policy Program offers its students the opportunity to take part in international study trips, contingent on available funding. In academic years 2010-11, AFP sent students on a study trip to China.

Program Activities: Washington, D.C.

Program Activities: Europe

Program Activities: Nanjing

Events



2014

  1. The Road to Global Prosperity 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Mar27

    Michael Mandelbaum, Christian A. Herter Professor and director of the American Foreign Policy Program, and Thomas Friedman, journalist, columnist, and author, will discuss their new book The Road to Global Prosperity. Note: Books will be available for purchase at the event. 

  2. Following the Leader: Ruling China, from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Mar25

    David M. Lampton, director of the SAIS China Studies Program, will discuss his new book Following the Leader: Ruling China from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping. Anne Thurston, research professor in the SAIS China Studies Program, will panel the discussion.

     

  3. U.S. State Department Career Panel 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM Mar14

    State Department employees will panel a discussion and answer questions regarding career experiences and opportunities for interested students. Note: This event is limited to the first 50 people that sign up. Note: This event is off the record.


  4. Following the Leader: Ruling China from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Feb11

    David M. Lampton, director of the SAIS China Studies Program, will discuss his new book Following the Leader: Ruling China from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping. Deborah Brautigam, director of the International Development Program at SAIS; Michael Swaine, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; and Douglas Paal, vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, will panel the discussion.

2013

  1. U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Oct28

    Steven Cook, the Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and a SAIS graduate, and Robert Danin, the Eni Enrico Mattei Senior Fellow for Middle East and Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, will discuss this topic.

  2. Give Peace a Chance: Preventing Mass Violence 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Sep23

    David Hamburg, president emeritus of the Carnegie Corporation, will discuss his book Give Peace a Chance: Preventing Mass Violence with Terry Hopmann, director of the SAIS Conflict Management Program, and Michael Mandelbaum, director of the SAIS American Foreign Policy Program.

  3. Capitol Hill Trek 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Apr29

    Jonathan Burks, director of the U.S. House Budget Committee; Tressa Guenov, professional staff member of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence; Richard Harper, legislative assistant for U.S. senator Dianne Feinstein; and Jamil Jaffer, Republican chief counsel and senior adviser to the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will discussing working on the Hill. Note: This event is open to faculty, staff and students only, and the speakers’ comments will be off the record. Lunch will be provided, and attendees will have the option to tour Capitol Hill after the discussion. Attendees should meet in Room 485 in the Senate Russell Building, located at Constitution Avenue and 2nd Street, NE, Washington, D.C.

  4. America’s Foreign Policy Toolkit: Key Institutions and Processes 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Apr22

    Charles Stevenson, a professorial lecturer in the SAIS American Foreign Policy Program, will make introductory remarks about his recent book, America’s Foreign Policy Toolkit: Key Institutions and Processes. A panel discussion about the book featuring Michael Mandelbaum, director of the SAIS American Foreign Policy Program; Nancy Bearg, former assistant to the vice president for National Security Affairs and former National Security Council staff; Eric Edelman, Roger Hertog Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence at the SAIS Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies; and R. Russell Rumbaugh, director of the Budgeting for Foreign Affairs and Defense program at the Stimson Center, will follow. 

  5. U.S. Department of State Panel 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Apr19

    Join a panel discussion with SAIS alumni currently working at the U.S. Department of State to gain a better understanding of the agency. Note: This event is open to SAIS students only. When RSVPing in SAISWorks, click on events, then workshops.

2012

  1. The Election: What to Look for on November 6th 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Oct25

Research

Our Alumni

External Resources

Contact Us

Michael Mandelbaum
Christian A. Herter Professor of American Foreign Policy, Director of the American Foreign Policy Program

AmericanForeignPolicy@jhu.edu
202-663-5669
Nitze 512

Starr Lee
Program Coordinator

starr.lee@jhu.edu
202-663-5714
Nitze 509

Address & Phone

American Foreign Policy
Nitze Building
1740 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, D.C.
20036
  • 202-663-5714
  • 202-663-5717