Overview
Faculty
Program Activities
Curriculum
Minor
Events Calendar
Our Alumni
External Resources
Contact
The Korea Studies Program was launched in 2006 in response to a growing demand for intensive study of political, security and economic issues on the Korean Peninsula. In its relatively short history, the program has grown rapidly to become one of the nation’s leading Korea policy studies programs, preparing the next generation of leaders and professionals in the field of Korean affairs.
 
We offer a unique interdisciplinary education that aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of Korea’s modern domestic politics, economics, and history, as well as its foreign policy relations with the United States and neighboring Asian nations. In addition to taking courses that are offered by Korea Studies, students are required to take classes from other Asian Studies programs to develop an understanding of the strategic environment that two Koreas face in regional and global contexts. Korean language classes are offered each semester to ensure students pass a Korean language proficiency test before graduating.

Korea Studies students can enrich their academic experience by attending related events and collaborating with visiting scholars hosted at the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins SAIS (USKI). Located in the heart of Washington, DC, many students choose to pursue internships and opportunities outside the classroom to enhance their education.
 
USKI-PCUP Forum
Korea Global Forum 2016
One Korea Forum: The Power of Freedom in Addressing the Divided Korean Family
Capitol Hill Briefing: The Power of Freedom in Addressing the Divided Korean Family
Korea Club at the SAIS International Dinner 2016
Training at the Library of Congress, October 2016
Training at the Library of Congress, October 2016
Poet Ko Un's Visit to USKI, September 2016
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2016
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2016
Korea Studies Monthly Luncheon featuring Dr. Erik Jones, September 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Ms. Grace Jo, Vice President of NK in USA, One Korea Forum
2016 Korea Studies Graduation Reception
2016 Korea Studies Mini Conference
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Korea Studies Research Trip, Seoul 2016
Two Koreas trip 2012_Dorasan Station
Korea Studies student lunch with Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, USKI Chairman
Korea Studies student Em Potosky presenting at the University of Hawaii 2015 Graduate Student Conference
SAIS students presented on Korea at the University of Hawaii 2015 Graduate Student Conference
SAIS student Kendrick Kuo presented on Korea at the University of Hawaii 2015 Graduate Student Conference
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014: KAERI Nuclear Research Reactor
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014: National Assembly
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014
Korea's Economic Development study trip November 2014: Lee Jae Oh
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2014
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2014
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2014
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2014
Welcome picnic for new students, September 2014
Class of 2014 graduation reception
Some Korea studies grads, class of 2014
Class of 2014 graduation reception
Korean language Prof. Tak (left) and visiting scholar
Korea studies student (right) mingling with USKI visiting scholars
Samulnori Performance and Lecture with Kim Duk Soo/김덕수
Samulnori Performance and Lecture with Kim Duk Soo/김덕수
Samulnori Performance and Lecture with Kim Duk Soo/김덕수
Korea Studies Luncheon with Congressman An_Nov 2013
Two Koreas trip 2012
Two Koreas trip 2012
Two Koreas trip 2012_DMZ visit
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Faculty

Program Activities

 

Research Opportunities

Students in Korea Studies are encouraged to work as research assistants for visiting scholars and staff at the US-Korea Institute (USKI [14]) at Johns Hopkins SAIS, an independent research institute that sponsors the Korea Studies Program.

 

Korea Studies Monthly Luncheons

Korea Studies organizes a monthly luncheon that features prominent policymakers, practitioners, and scholars of Korean affairs to speak about a wide range of critical issues in the region and share their fields of research and expertise. Open exclusively to the Johns Hopkins SAIS community, the luncheon is intended to provide a forum for informal and candid exchanges between guest speakers and students.

 

US-Korea Institute Events

Tasked with a mission to increase understanding in and about the Korean peninsula through educational offerings, research, and public outreach, USKI [14] hosts a variety of Korea-related events, seminars, and conferences throughout the year. One of USKI’s monthly events is the USKI Brown Bag Lunch Seminar, which invites leading scholars and practitioners of Korean affairs to share their research interests and career experiences in a casual and intimate setting. All students are welcome to attend USKI’s public and school community-only events.

 

Language Exchange

Students are encouraged to participate in the language exchange program between USKI visiting scholars and SAIS students each semester. Visiting scholars enjoy the opportunity to engage with students, learn about another culture, and can often be an excellent resource for course work and future research. 

 

Fellowships

Every year, the US-Korea Institute offers academic and summer fellowships to competitive students who have demonstrated academic excellence and commitment to Korea studies. Academic year fellowship applications are due mid-February of the preceding semester. More information can be found under External Resources [15].

 

Curriculum

 

Korea Studies | MA Academic Requirements

Korea Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives [16]

Entering Class 2017-2018

MA students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 courses (48 credits) or 14 courses (56 credits) as approved by Academic Affairs.
 
KOREA STUDIES [17]
Students concentrating in Korea Studies must take at least 3 courses within this program. One of the courses must be SA.765.704 The Politics of Vortex? Political History of South Korea.
 
ASIAN STUDIES [18]
Korea Studies concentrators must also fulfill the requirements for the field of Asian Studies, which include 3 Asian Studies area courses outside of Korea Studies. One of those courses must be from China Studies and one must be from Japan Studies.
 
Students in Korea Studies also have the option of pursuing a specialization in the International Relations of Asia [19] (AsiaIR).

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 16 credits. The four required courses are:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent: Microeconomics)
  • International Trade Theory (prerequisite: Microeconomics)
  • International Monetary Theory (prerequisite: Macroeconomics)

If a student passes a waiver exam [20] in one of these areas, the student must take a replacement International Economics program course(s) to fulfill the concentration requirement.

Starting with the entering class of Fall 2017, students who pass Microeconomics in Pre-Term [21] will have the concentration reduced to 12 credits, but still must complete Macroeconomics, International Trade Theory, and International Monetary Theory (or a replacement course(s) if waiver exam(s) passed). The Pre-Term Microeconomics course is not for credit and is not factored into the GPA.

Beyond the requirements, many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization [22] in one of four areas of economics. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets [23].

Concentration GPA Requirement
Students must achieve a combined GPA of at least 2.67 in four (or three if Microeconomics is passed in Pre-Term) required International Economics program courses or they must retake the course(s) until a 2.67 concentration GPA is achieved. In the standard case, the concentration GPA will be the average of the grades of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Trade Theory, and International Monetary Theory.

If one or more of the four standard courses is waived, the school will use the highest grade(s) from any eligible replacement International Economics program course(s) to compute the International Economics concentration GPA.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.

  • Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
  • Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
  • Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
  • Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
  • Risk Analysis and Modeling
  • Quantitative Global Economics (prerequisite International Monetary Theory)
  • Credit Markets & Credit Risk (prerequisite Corporate Finance)

Students may not double-count the same course toward the Quantitative Reasoning requirement and as an International Economics concentration course and vice-versa.

If a student passes the statistics waiver exam, the student must take an alternate course from the list above to fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Starting with the entering class of Fall 2017, students who pass Statistical Methods for Business & Economics in Pre-Term [21] will have fulfilled the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. The Pre-Term course is not for credit and is not factored into the GPA.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All students must pass 2 core courses and/or exams from the subjects below. Korea Studies concentrators must pass Comparative Politics as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the core courses/exams are not completed by the start of the final semester, the student no longer has the option of completing the exam and must enroll in the core course(s) for credit.

  • American Foreign Policy Since World War II
  • Comparative Politics
  • Evolution of the International Systems
  • Theories of International Relations
 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Korea Studies MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in Korean. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS. Native Korean speakers must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English.

 

CAPSTONE

Korea Studies MA concentrators must complete ONE of the following capstones:

  • Submission of a substantial (no less than 8,000 words, including footnotes or endnotes) research paper of publishable quality by April 1 of their final semester.* This paper must have Korea as a central focus, and can be the revised product of a regular SAIS course or independent research supervised by a Korea Studies faculty member.
  • Korea Studies Oral Exam
  • MA Oral Exam (to compete for honors—if eligible)

*For those whose final semester is fall, consult the Program Director for due date.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2016-2017 [24]
Entering Class 2015-2016 [25]
Entering Class 2014-2015 [26]
Entering Class 2013-2014 [27]
Entering Class 2012-2013 [28]
Entering Class 2011-2012 [29]
Entering Class 2010-2011 [30]
Entering Class 2009-2010 [31]

Minor

Korea Studies Minor Requirements:

  • 3 Korea Studies (or cross-listed) courses (12 credits)
  • 2 semesters of Korean language study or proficiency

General Minor Requirements:

  • MA students may pursue an optional minor in a policy or regional program. A student cannot pursue a minor in General IR or International Economics, but can pursue a Specialization in International Economics [32]
  • A student can have only one minor and can declare a minor at any time prior to graduation.
  • Students do not receive bidding priority for a minor.
  • All minors require three courses. Some minors require a specific course(s) and/or language proficiency.
  • A student may use a maximum of one applicable cross-listed course (4 credits) toward both a minor AND concentration requirements. In the IR or Asia concentrations, the cross-listed course must be from the primary concentration area and not from the 2 additional required courses in the other IR or Asia areas.

To add or change a minor, please click HERE [33].

Events

The Korea Studies Program offeres unique opportunities to meet with prominent policymakers, practitioners and scholars of Korean affairs througout the year. Events range from small, private luncheons [35] with guest speakers, to large public events [36] hosted by the US-Korea Institute (USKI).


Our Alumni

 

Our Alumni

Korea Studies alumni have gone on to work in government, academia, law, non-profits/NGOs and more. The following organizations currently employ Korea Studies alumni:

  • US Department of State
  • US Department of Treasury
  • US Department of Defense
  • US House of Representatives
  • World Bank
  • IHS
  • Empathy for a Better World Foundation
  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • Sughrue Mion PLLC
  • New York University

 

We encourage our alumni to keep in touch both in person and online, via our Facebook [37] group.

 

 

External Resources

 

US Korea Institute Fellowships

 
The purpose of the US-Korea Institute is to increase information and understanding of Korea and Korean affairs. The Institute supports courses, fellowships, research, and academic enterprises in Korea Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS. It provides a limited number of fellowships to support students who study Korea at the school.
 
Requirements:
Students applying for this award must pursue the Korea Studies concentration as their primary concentration at the school. Priority for this award will be given to US and other non-Korean citizens, but is open to all students in the Korea Studies program. Students receiving this award must be a full-time student with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.4, make satisfactory progress toward fulfilling Korea Studies requirements, attend all monthly Korea Studies Luncheons and actively participate in US-Korea Institute events. Some awardees may be asked to work for the Institute or as an RA.

Fellows must maintain full-time status at SAIS to receive the award for a specific semester. Any changes in student status could lead to alteration, postponement, or cancellation of the amount of the reward or the reward itself.
 
Award:
The amount of the award is variable, depending upon merit, experience, and financial need. These awards are renewable for the second year of study at the school, provided the student fulfills the requirements specified above.
 
Application Procedures:
Applicants are asked to submit a curriculum vitae or résumé, along with a brief (350-400 word) essay detailing their interest in Korea, their plan of study at the school, and their future goals. Applications for the fellowship are due to the US-Korea Institute by the school's financial aid deadline of the preceding semester. Submit applications to slee459@jhu.edu [38] or fax to 202-827-0625. 
 

More Information

Please visit our Korea Studies Facebook Page [39]!  


Check out the US-Korea Institute websites:

http://uskoreainstitute.org/  [40]
http://38North.org [41]

Contact Us


Seo Ho Lee
Academic Program Coordinator
slee459@jhu.edu [38]
202-650-5405
1717 Massachusetts Avenue NW 629 Washington, DC 20036

Address & Phone

Korea Studies
1717 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Sixth Floor
Washington, DC 20036

202-663-5830

202-827-0625

On the Web

Friend on Facebook [42]