Corporate Risk, Business & Human Rights. Growing Responsibilities in a Changing World (Part III of a Four-part Series)

Oil & Gas and Conflict Minerals: Corporate Responsibility in the Extractive Sector
Nina L. Gardner
Strategy International; Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Business and human rights is at the cornerstone of some of the most difficult challenges corporations, lawyers, investors, civil society representatives and legislators face today. This series of lectures/mini-course will provide an introduction to this emerging and rapidly evolving field, and to the developing international movement to encourage companies to take responsibility for their human rights impacts. The series starts with an overview of the governance gap regarding corporate behavior in the international regulatory framework, and covers the rapidly developing norms and regulations designed to improve business conduct. The following lectures will examine the developing responsibility of companies regarding labor issues in their supply chains, and the particularly difficult human rights challenges that affect the extractive sector. The series will close by considering the critical role of various stakeholders, particularly activist investors, in holding corporations more accountable. The object of this lecture series is to introduce students and faculty to this field, generate lively discussion regarding the role and responsibilities of corporations, and highlight the risk corporations take when human rights impacts are not adequately addressed.

NINA L. GARDNER

Nina L. Gardner is the director of Strategy International, a consulting firm she founded in 2000 specializing in advising corporations on CSR partnerships, establishing internal global sustainability and human rights procedures, and providing outreach to socially responsible investors. Past clients have included major multinational corporations like Pfizer and Enel, and international organizations such as the OECD.

A lawyer by training (which included a semester working on the Bhopal case with an Indian public interest firm), she practiced corporate law in Washington DC. In 1996 she joined the UN as a political officer in their Zagreb liaison office, reporting on human rights violations in postwar Croatia. She also worked as an advisor to the OECD project "Measuring the Progress of Society" offering alternatives to GDP as a measure of development and government performance. Her varied professional experiences convinced her that the best way to effectuate change is to encourage the public, private sector and civil society to work together – and that business can turn human rights and environmental challenges into growth opportunities.

Ms. Gardner is an activist in women's issues – and is the founding president of three professional women's associations in Europe (Prague, Paris, Rome). She is on the advisory board of the Women's Forum for the Economy in Society and the Harvard Coalition for Responsible Investment. She is a graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe, Columbia Law School and was a Rotary scholar at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotà, Colombia. Ms. Gardner is fluent in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, and is a member of the New York Bar and the Council on Foreign Relations. She taught Business & Human Rights from 2019-2012 at Washington College of Law at American University, and has been teaching at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington DC since 2013.

Gardner Mini-course Fall 2017.pdf

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Date and Time
November 13, 2017
10:30am - 12:30pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Mixed Migration Flows – Challenges and Solutions

Andreas Kamm
Danish Refugee Council, Denmark

Migration Series

Andreas Kamm will focus on how refugee and migration issues have developed over the past 20 years and will attempt to look at future challenges and solutions. Kamm will examine the role of civil society and civil society organisations, and the management of a large international NGO working on "the humanitarian and development market". Kamm is deeply concerned by the fact that mixed migration flows put pressure on our democratic values and on basic human rights.

ANDREAS KAMM

Andreas Kamm is the Secretary General of the Danish Refugee Council.

In the course of the 37 years Andreas Kamm has been with the Danish Refugee Council he has worked within technical as well as management areas. Mr Kamm is a Master of Arts in history and has worked for some years as a teacher and later principal of one of the the Danish Refugee Council's language schools, as educational advisor as well as labour market advisor. For a number of years Kamm was head of the Danish Refugee Council's Central Integration Department, Copenhagen. Since 1996 he was in office as Deputy Secretary General until he was appointed Secretary General in 1998.


Kamm is a member of the Danish official delegation to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees' annual Executive Meetings. Kamm was chairman of the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership (HAP) in Geneva (2007-09), chairman of ECRE, the European Council on Refugees and Exiles (2009-15), and chairman of the Council of Human Rights (under Institute for Human Rights) (2015-).

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Date and Time
November 9, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Corporate Risk, Business & Human Rights. Growing Responsibilities in a Changing World (Part II of a Four-part Series)

The Supply Chain: From Rana Plaza to Foxconn. Issues of Corporate Responsibility and Complicity
Nina L. Gardner
Strategy International; Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Business and human rights is at the cornerstone of some of the most difficult challenges corporations, lawyers, investors, civil society representatives and legislators face today. This series of lectures/mini-course will provide an introduction to this emerging and rapidly evolving field, and to the developing international movement to encourage companies to take responsibility for their human rights impacts. The series starts with an overview of the governance gap regarding corporate behavior in the international regulatory framework, and covers the rapidly developing norms and regulations designed to improve business conduct. The following lectures will examine the developing responsibility of companies regarding labor issues in their supply chains, and the particularly difficult human rights challenges that affect the extractive sector. The series will close by considering the critical role of various stakeholders, particularly activist investors, in holding corporations more accountable. The object of this lecture series is to introduce students and faculty to this field, generate lively discussion regarding the role and responsibilities of corporations, and highlight the risk corporations take when human rights impacts are not adequately addressed.

NINA L. GARDNER

Nina L. Gardner is the director of Strategy International, a consulting firm she founded in 2000 specializing in advising corporations on CSR partnerships, establishing internal global sustainability and human rights procedures, and providing outreach to socially responsible investors. Past clients have included major multinational corporations like Pfizer and Enel, and international organizations such as the OECD.

A lawyer by training (which included a semester working on the Bhopal case with an Indian public interest firm), she practiced corporate law in Washington DC. In 1996 she joined the UN as a political officer in their Zagreb liaison office, reporting on human rights violations in postwar Croatia. She also worked as an advisor to the OECD project "Measuring the Progress of Society" offering alternatives to GDP as a measure of development and government performance. Her varied professional experiences convinced her that the best way to effectuate change is to encourage the public, private sector and civil society to work together – and that business can turn human rights and environmental challenges into growth opportunities.

Ms. Gardner is an activist in women's issues – and is the founding president of three professional women's associations in Europe (Prague, Paris, Rome). She is on the advisory board of the Women's Forum for the Economy in Society and the Harvard Coalition for Responsible Investment. She is a graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe, Columbia Law School and was a Rotary scholar at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotà, Colombia. Ms. Gardner is fluent in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, and is a member of the New York Bar and the Council on Foreign Relations. She taught Business & Human Rights from 2019-2012 at Washington College of Law at American University, and has been teaching at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington DC since 2013.

Gardner Mini-course Fall 2017.pdf

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Date and Time
November 9, 2017
10:30am - 12:30pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Corporate Risk, Business & Human Rights. Growing Responsibilities in a Changing World (Part I of a Four-part Series)

Business and Human Rights: Evolving Global Expectations Regarding Corporate Conduct
Nina L. Gardner
Strategy International; Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Business and human rights is at the cornerstone of some of the most difficult challenges corporations, lawyers, investors, civil society representatives and legislators face today. This series of lectures/mini-course will provide an introduction to this emerging and rapidly evolving field, and to the developing international movement to encourage companies to take responsibility for their human rights impacts. The series starts with an overview of the governance gap regarding corporate behavior in the international regulatory framework, and covers the rapidly developing norms and regulations designed to improve business conduct. The following lectures will examine the developing responsibility of companies regarding labor issues in their supply chains, and the particularly difficult human rights challenges that affect the extractive sector. The series will close by considering the critical role of various stakeholders, particularly activist investors, in holding corporations more accountable. The object of this lecture series is to introduce students and faculty to this field, generate lively discussion regarding the role and responsibilities of corporations, and highlight the risk corporations take when human rights impacts are not adequately addressed.

NINA L. GARDNER

Nina L. Gardner is the director of Strategy International, a consulting firm she founded in 2000 specializing in advising corporations on CSR partnerships, establishing internal global sustainability and human rights procedures, and providing outreach to socially responsible investors. Past clients have included major multinational corporations like Pfizer and Enel, and international organizations such as the OECD.

A lawyer by training (which included a semester working on the Bhopal case with an Indian public interest firm), she practiced corporate law in Washington DC. In 1996 she joined the UN as a political officer in their Zagreb liaison office, reporting on human rights violations in postwar Croatia. She also worked as an advisor to the OECD project "Measuring the Progress of Society" offering alternatives to GDP as a measure of development and government performance. Her varied professional experiences convinced her that the best way to effectuate change is to encourage the public, private sector and civil society to work together – and that business can turn human rights and environmental challenges into growth opportunities.

Ms. Gardner is an activist in women's issues – and is the founding president of three professional women's associations in Europe (Prague, Paris, Rome). She is on the advisory board of the Women's Forum for the Economy in Society and the Harvard Coalition for Responsible Investment. She is a graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe, Columbia Law School and was a Rotary scholar at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotà, Colombia. Ms. Gardner is fluent in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, and is a member of the New York Bar and the Council on Foreign Relations. She taught Business & Human Rights from 2019-2012 at Washington College of Law at American University, and has been teaching at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington DC since 2013.

Gardner Mini-course Fall 2017.pdf

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Date and Time
November 6, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


The Role of Cost and Price Competitiveness in the Eurozone

Lucio Baccaro
University of Geneva, Switzerland

The main political economy interpretation for the Eurocrisis is the so-called labor market view. In short, the labor market view claims that differences in wage bargaining systems account for the diverging current account balances in the Eurozone. While coordinated labor markets like those of Germany and other core euro countries are both willing and capable of engaging in nominal wage restraint, uncoordinated labor markets like those of Southern Europe are not. We amend the labor market view in two important theoretical respects. First, we spell out how differences in labor market institutions translate into differences in unit labor costs, prices, real exchanges rates, and ultimately current account balances. Second, we reconcile the labor market view with an alternative explanation for the Eurocrisis, which sees cross-border flows of financial assets as its root cause. Our empirical analysis also consists of two parts. First, we show descriptively that Germany has seen a significant boost in cost competitiveness based on wage moderation since the introduction of the euro, vis-à-vis both coordinated and uncoordinated EMU members. Second, our regression analysis reveals that cost and price competitiveness has had a large positive effect on German bilateral exports within the Eurozone. However, we cannot replicate the same finding for other coordinated economies. Finally, we find that Italian bilateral exports are strongly price-sensitive, suggesting that Italy suffers from an over-appreciated real exchange rate.

LUCIO BACCARO

Lucio Baccaro is Professor of Sociology and Deputy Dean at the School of Social Science of the University of Geneva, Switzerland.

Lucio (Pasquale Vincenzo) Baccaro's interests lie in the interaction of social and economic forces and how such interaction shapes the norms that regulate contemporary capitalist societies, particularly with respect to labour markets and welfare states. His research is mostly macro-comparative and combines quantitative analysis of large datasets with in-depth investigation of case studies based on field research. A related interest is the emergence of new forms of democratic governance centering on participatory and deliberative institutions.

Prior to joining the University of Geneva, Baccaro was a faculty member at MIT, Sloan School of Management, Institute for Work and Employment Research (2006-2008), a Senior Research Officer at the International Institute for Labour Studies, International Labour Organization (2000-2005), and a faculty member at Case Western Reserve University (1998-2000). He holds a PhD in Industrial Relations and Political Science from MIT.

Professor Baccaro will present and discuss his latest paper on "The Role of Cost and Price Competitiveness in the Eurozone".

See attached file.


Baccaro Paper.pdf

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Date and Time
November 6, 2017
12:00pm - 1:30pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Transnational Right-Wing Religious Movements in the Global Arena

Susanna Mancini
University of Bologna and Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Italy

Religion in International Law and International Relations Series

Susanna Mancini is Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law at the University of Bologna and Adjunct Professor of International Law at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe.

Professor Mancini is interested in the intersection of law and culture, and particularly in law and religion, gender and the law, reproductive rights, multiculturalism, the multilevel protection of fundamental rights, federalism and secession. She is the Italian member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Constitutional Law. Professor Mancini has served as visiting professor at Fordham School of Law (NYC), the University of Toulouse, the Central European University, the Interdisciplinary Center (Israel); also a Floersheimer distinguished fellow and visiting professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo Law School and a Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute; a lecturer at several universities including Yale, Oxford, Columbia, Toronto, Montreal, and University College London; a member of the Center for Constitutional Studies and Democratic Development. Ph.D., European University Institute and a JD from the Bologna School of Law.

Publications: Professor Mancini is currently working on an edited volume (with Michel Rosenfeld) on the "Conscience Wars" (Cambridge University Press). Her other publications include: Dorsen Rosenfeld, Sajo, Baer and Mancini Comparative Constitutionalism Cases and Materials (2016); Constitutional Secularism in an Age of Religious Revival, co-edited (2014); "Secession and Self-Determination," in Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law (2012); "Patriarchy as the Exclusive Domain of the Other: The Veil Controversy, False Projection and Cultural Racism," in International Journal of Constitutional Law (2012); "The Crucifix Rage: Supra-National Constitutionalism Bumps Against the Counter-Majoritarian Difficulty," in European Constitutional Law Review (2010); "To Be or Not To Be Jewish: The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom Answers The Question," in European Constitutional Law Review (2010); "The Judge as Moral Arbiter? The Case of Abortion," co-author, in Constitutional Topography: Constitutions and Values (2010); "The Power of Symbols and Symbols as Power: Secularism and Religion as Guarantors of Cultural Convergence," in Cardozo Law Review (2009); "Rethinking the Boundaries of Democratic Secession: Liberalism, Nationalism and the Right of Minorities to Self-Determination," in International Journal of Constitutional Law (2008).

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Date and Time
October 9, 2017
7:30pm - 9:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Catalonia Votes: Viewpoints on a Constitutional Crisis

Lluis Dalmau, Justin O. Frosini, Mark Gilbert

Lluis Dalmau
MA Candidate, Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe

Justin O. Frosini
Director of the Center for Constitutional Studies and Democratic Development and Adjunct Professor of Constitutional Law, Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe; Assistant Professor of Public Law, Luigi Bocconi University

Mark Gilbert
Professor of History and International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe

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Date and Time
October 6, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


BOOK PRESENTATION - Israel under Siege: The Politics of Insecurity and the Rise of the Israeli Neo-Revisionist Right

Raffaella Del Sarto
Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Italy

Raffaella A. Del Sarto examines the creation of Israel's neo-revisionist consensus about security threats and regional order, which took hold of Israeli politics and society after 2000 and persists today. The failed Oslo peace process and the trauma of the Second Palestinian Intifada triggered this shift to the right; conflicts with Hamas and Hezbollah and the inflammatory rhetoric of Iranian President Ahmadinejad additionally contributed to the creation of a general sense of being under siege. While Israel faces real security threats, Israeli governments have engaged in the politics of insecurity, promoting and amplifying a sense of besiegement. Lively political debate has been replaced by a general acceptance of the no-compromise approach to security and the Palestinians. The neo-revisionist right, represented by Benjamin Netanyahu and the Likud, has turned Israel away from the peace process and pushes maximalist territorial ambitions. But they have failed to offer a vision for an end to conflict, and there has been little debate about whether or not the hardline policies toward the region are counterproductive. Del Sarto explains this disappearance of dissent and examines the costs of Israel's policies. She concludes that Israel's feeling of being under siege has become entrenched, a two-state solution with the Palestinians is highly unlikely for the foreseeable future, and Israel's international isolation is likely to increase.

RAFFAELLA A. DEL SARTO


Raffaella A. Del Sarto is Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at the Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), SAIS Europe at Bologna, and a part-time professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute in Florence, Italy. She is the author of Contested State Identities and Regional Security in the Euro-Mediterranean Area, the coeditor of The Convergence of Civilizations: Constructing a Mediterranean Region, and editor of Fragmented Borders, Interdependence, and External Relations: The Israel-Palestine-European Union Triangle.

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Date and Time
October 16, 2017
7:30pm - 9:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


BOOK PRESENTATION - The New Sultan: Erdogan and the Crisis of Modern Turkey

Soner Cagaptay
Turkish Research Program, The Washington Institute, U.S.

In a world of rising tensions between Russia and the United States, the Middle East and Europe, Sunnis and Shiites, Islamism and liberalism, Turkey is at the epicentre. And at the heart of Turkey is its right-wing populist president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Since 2002, Erdogan has consolidated his hold on domestic politics while using military and diplomatic means to solidify Turkey as a regional power. His crackdown has been brutal and consistent – thousands of journalists arrested, academics officially banned from leaving the country, university deans fired and many of the highest-ranking military officers arrested. In some senses, the nefarious and failed 2016 coup has given Erdogan the licence to make good on his repeated promise to bring order and stability under a "strongman". Here, leading Turkish expert Soner Cagaptay will look at Erdogan's roots in Turkish history, what he believes in and how he has cemented his rule, as well as what this means for the world. The book will also unpick the ‘threats' Erdogan has worked to combat – from the liberal Turks to the Gulen movement, from coup plotters to Kurdish nationalists – all of which have culminated in the crisis of modern Turkey.

SONER CAGAPTAY

Soner Cagaptay is the Beyer Family fellow and director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute. He has written extensively on U.S.-Turkish relations, Turkish domestic politics and Turkish nationalism, publishing in scholarly journals and major international print media, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, New York Times, Foreign Affairs, Atlantic, New Republic, and Newsweek Turkiye. He has been a regular columnist for Hurriyet Daily News, Turkey's oldest and most influential English-language paper, and a contributor to CNN's Global Public Square blog. He appears regularly on Fox News, CNN, NPR, Voice of America, BBC, and CNN-Turk.

A historian by training, Dr. Cagaptay wrote his doctoral dissertation at Yale University (2003) on Turkish nationalism. Dr. Cagaptay has taught courses at Yale, Princeton University, Georgetown University, and Smith College on the Middle East, Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe. His spring 2003 course on modern Turkish history was the first offered by Yale in three decades. From 2006-2007, he was Ertegun Professor at Princeton University's Department of Near Eastern Studies.

Dr. Cagaptay is the recipient of numerous honors, grants, and chairs, among them the Smith-Richardson, Mellon, Rice, and Leylan fellowships, as well as the Ertegun chair at Princeton. He has also served on contract as chair of the Turkey Advanced Area Studies Program at the State Department's Foreign Service Institute. In 2012 he was named an American Turkish Society Young Society Leader.

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Date and Time
October 3, 2017
1:00pm - 2:30pm Local Time

Campus


Location


The Role of Private Equity in Central European Transition

Martin Miszerak
Miszerak & Associates, Poland

Martin A. Miszerak is the founder and CEO of Miszerak & Associates.

Since 1990, he has worked extensively in Central Europe, particularly in Poland, where he actively participated in the country's transition from central planning to market economy, serving there initially as Adviser to the Minister of Privatization in 1990-91. Subsequently, as Adviser to the Minister of Finance, he was chiefly involved in the restructuring and privatization of the Polish banking sector. He also served as Chairman of a major state-owned bank, being readied for privatization. In 1995, he moved to the private sector, becoming CEO of a fund management company, with the objective of participating in Poland's mass privatization program. In the early 2000's, he founded his own investment banking company which has been involved in a variety of merger and acquisition and capital market transactions in Central Europe, Russia, and Italy. He has also advised numerous private equity funds and is currently Senior Adviser to Private Equity Partners, a leading Italian private equity fund based in Milan. Martin Miszerak started his career in 1979 with Manufacturers Hanover Trust (one of the predecessor banks of JP Morgan), working in New York and Italy. Miszerak is a graduate of SAIS Europe ‘78 and SAIS Washington ‘79. In addition to his SAIS degree, he has received an MBA from Yale School of Management and a BA from Princeton.

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Date and Time
October 12, 2017
1:30pm - 3:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


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