Gender and Religion in Israel

Margit Cohn
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Religion in International Law and International Relations Series

Margit Cohn is Henry J. and Fannie Harkavy Chair in Comparative Law at the Faculty of Law, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Professor Cohn's research interests are in of regulation, law and religion, and comparative public law. She has published, inter alia, in The American Journal of Comparative Law, the Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence, Public Law, and the International and Comparative Law Quarterly.

Previously a counsel at the Israeli Central Bank (1988-2000), Professor Cohn has taught in the United Kingdom (2002-2005) and was a visiting scholar at the universities of Columbia, Georgetown, Lyon, Oxford and Tulane. She has taught comparative constitutional law in most of these institutions, and is currently working on a project concerned with executive powers, addressing both conceptual and comparative contexts.

Home page: http://en.law.huji.ac.il/Margit-Cohn.

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Date and Time
November 13, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Afghanistan: Vicious Circles of Violence

Inge Missmahl
Psychoanalyst, Germany

Conflict Management, Failing States and Peacebuilding Series. Supported by the Steven Muller Chair in German Studies

Inge Missmahl, Dipl. Analytical Psychologist, Psychoanalyst. From dancer to humanitarian by way of analytical psychology, Inge Missmahl's unusual life trajectory led her to Kabul in 2004, where she saw that more than 60 percent of the population was suffering from depressive symptoms and traumatic experiences - hardly surprising in a country that had lived with ongoing violence, poverty, and insecurity for 30 years. In response, Missmahl founded the psychosocial Project Kabul for Caritas Germany, a project that trained Afghan men and women to offer psychosocial counseling in 15 centers throughout the city. The project has offered free treatment to 12,000 clients to date, helping to restore self-determination and well-being, while breaking down ingrained gender barriers and the social stigma of mental illness. Thanks to Missmahl's efforts, psychosocial counseling is now integrated into the Afghan health system.

Missmahl now works on behalf of the European Union as Technical Advisor for Mental Health for the Afghan government, and is founder of the International Psychosocial Organisation (IPSO), a network of experts dedicated to developing and implementing psychosocial programs in various contexts. IPSO is specialized in the field of mental health and psychosocial care, in developing locally adapted concepts, and in delivering training for psychosocial counsellors, medical doctors, nurses and community health workers, enabling them to treat mental health-related problems including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress following war, insecurity and challenging living conditions. IPSO has established close working relationships with the Afghan Ministry of Public Health and all other stakeholders working in the field of Mental Health in Afghanistan.

Missmahl and IPSO support cultural dialogue and cultural expression through their concept of "cultural containers" (www.ipso-cc-afghanistan.org) in several Afghan cities, thus strengthening cultural and social identity.

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Date and Time
December 14, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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The Study of Extra-legal Governance

Federico Varese
University of Oxford, U.K.

The Politics of Crime and Conflict

Federico Varese is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford.

Varese has written on the Russian mafia, Soviet criminal history, migration of mafia groups, Somali piracy, the dynamics of altruistic behaviour, and the application of Social Network Analysis to criminology. He is the author of two monographs - The Russian Mafia (OUP, 2001) and Mafias on the Move (PUP, 2011); these two books have been translated into several languages, including Italian, Polish and Danish. Varese also edited the four-volume collection Organised Crime (Routledge, 2010). He has published papers in journals such as The British Journal of Criminology, Law and Society Review, Archives Européenes de Sociologie, Political Studies, Cahiers du Monde Russe, Rationality & Society, European Sociological Review, and Trends in Organized Crime. He contributes to The Times Literary Supplement and, in Italy, the daily La Stampa. His work has been featured in The Economist, The BBC News & World Service, ABC, The Guardian, The New York Times, The Monkeycage Blog and Freakonomics blog, among others. Mafias on the Move was the recipient of The International Association for the Study of Organized Crime 2012 Outstanding Publication Award. The Russian Mafia was the co-recipient of the Ed A. Hewett Book Prize, awarded by The American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies.

His new book, Mafia Life (June 2017) is being translated into seven languages and has been optioned for TV.

Professor Varese holds degrees from Bologna University, Cambridge University and Oxford University. He was a Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford, and a visiting professor at Yale University and City University of Hong Kong. He is currently on the editorial Board of The British Journal of Criminology and has been Editor of the journal Global Crime.

John le Carré wrote: "Federico Varese is two writers rolled into one: a fearless fact-hunter who goes after his quarry with the zeal of a thoroughbred journalist, and a dedicated academic who examines and analyzes his catch with relentless detachment. Throw in a robust understanding of the impact of contemporary history on the behavior of a globalized criminal underworld, and you have both a compelling read and an impeccable work of reference."

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Date and Time
December 11, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Is the EU's Neighbourhood Policy in the Mediterranean Proving Effective?

James Moran
European External Action Service, U.K.

Contemporary History and Institutions of the Mediterranean Series

James Moran has just retired as Principal Advisor on the Middle East and North Africa at the European External Action Service. He was Ambassador and Head of the European Union Delegation in the Arab Republic of Egypt from February 2012 to September 2016.

His long service with the European Institutions has been spent entirely in external relations and includes wide experience in the Middle East, where he also headed the EU missions to Jordan and Yemen in 1999-2002. Moran was the EU's senior coordinator in Libya during the 2011 revolution.

Between 2002 and 2011, after heading the China division in Brussels he was the EU's Asia Director from 2006-2011, and was chief negotiator for a number of EU partnership agreements with China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Earlier experience in the 1980's and 90's included service with the EU Delegations in Jamaica and Ethiopia and various assignments in Brussels. Prior to joining the EU in 1983 he worked for the UK government and private sector in London.

A U.K. national, he attended Keele, Harvard and London Universities.

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Date and Time
November 30, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Historical Legacies and Contemporary African Development

Elias Papaioannou
London Business School, U.K.

International Economics Series

Elias Papaioannou is Professor of Economics at the London Business School.

Professor Papaioannou's research focuses on international finance; political economy; applied econometrics; macro aspects of regulation; law and finance; and growth and development. His research has been recognised with the inaugural 2013 European Investment Bank Young Economist Award; the European Economic Association's Young Economist Award, 2005; and the Royal Economic Association's Austin Robinson Memorial Prize, 2008.

Professor Papaioannou is also a research affiliate of the CEPR (Centre for Economic Policy Research) and the NBER (National Bureau of Economic Research), the leading research institutes in Europe and the United States, respectively.

After completion of his doctorate in 2005, he worked for two years at the Financial Research Division of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, Germany. From 2007 to 2012, he served as Assistant Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College (NH, USA). Between 2010 and 2012 he was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Economics Department of Harvard University (MA, USA).

He has published in many leading peer-refereed journals, such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Finance, Econometrica, The Economic Journal, The Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Development Economics, The Journal of the European Economic Association and The Journal of International Economics. His work has also appeared in numerous edited books.

Professor Papaioannou consults regularly with international organisations, major investment banks, hedge funds, and institutional investors on macroeconomic developments in the EU and Greece.

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Date and Time
November 27, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Macron and the Future of France and Europe

Camille Pecastaing
Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Camille Pecastaing is Academic Director & Senior Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at Johns Hopkins University SAIS.

Background and Education: Pecastaing was a student of behavioral sciences and historical sociology. His research focuses on the cognitive and emotive foundations of xenophobic political cultures and ethnoreligious violence, using the Muslim world and its European and Asian peripheries as a case study. He is a contributor to the Working Group on Islamism and the International Order at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Pecastaing has a PhD in international relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS.

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Date and Time
November 21, 2017
12:00pm - 1:30pm Local Time

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King Salman and His Son: Winning the US, Losing the Rest

Madawi Al-Rasheed
London School of Economics and Political Science, U.K.

The Middle East: Understanding the Role of Regional and External Powers Series

With the appointment of Muhammad ibn Salman as crown prince in June 2017, Saudi foreign policy seems to have become the focus of wide-ranging speculation. Although King Salman is still in office, we can assume that his son Muhammad had been de facto orchestrator of Saudi foreign policy even before he was confirmed in his new role as crown prince in June 2017. In terms of relations with the US, Muhammad ibn Salman succeeded in establishing a momentarily strong rapport with President Donald Trump and his administration. This was achieved thanks to serious investment in public relations companies, lobbyists in Washington and the promise to inject funds in the US economy. Relations with Europe look as if they have entered a cooling off period with European leaders still unsure about how to assess the young prince. Many Europeans are nevertheless keen to win the heart and mind of the young prince, with the prospect of financial rewards and stronger military partnerships for economic, strategic and security reasons. In the Arab region, the young Saudi prince has already cemented new, albeit shaky, partnerships with countries such as Egypt and the UAE, in order to further isolate his archenemy, Iran. In the Gulf, the recent rift with Qatar threatens to undermine cooperation in the GCC. This presentation assesses the prospect of new directions in Saudi foreign policy, highlighting its continuities and discontinuities under the new leadership of King Salman and his son Muhammad. It draws tentative conclusions that amidst a series of foreign policy failures, winning over President Donald Trump's USA has been King Salman and his son Muhammad's major achievement. However, Saudi foreign policy in Europe has gradually become secondary. Today several European countries seriously question the merit of Saudi's assertive and interventionist regional policy, considered in some European circles a destabilizer of the Arab world. With the US secured as the old Saudi patron and ally, King Salman and his son will give little attention to Europe, but will continue with an erratic and less successful bid to control the region and emerge as a regional power on par with Iran, Turkey, and Israel.

MADAWI AL-RASHEED

Madawi Al-Rasheed is Visiting Professor at the Middle East Centre at London School of Economics, and Political Science and Research Fellow at the Open Society Foundation.

She was Professor of Anthropology of Religion at King's College, London between 1994 and 2013. Previously, she was Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. Al-Rasheed also taught at Goldsmith College (University of London) and the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford.

Since joining the MEC, Madawi Al-Rasheed has conducted research on mutations among Saudi Islamists after the 2011 Arab Uprisings. This research focuses on the new reinterpretations of Islamic texts prevalent among a small minority of Saudi reformers and activism in the pursuit of democratic governance and civil society. The result of this research project, sponsored by the Open Society Foundation Fellowship Programme, will appear in a monograph entitled Muted Modernists: The Struggle Over Divine Politics in Saudi Arabia (2015, Hurst & OUP).

In addition, Al-Rasheed has published several articles in academic journals and edited volumes on Saudi Arabia's political development since the Arab uprisings, gender policies, and current affairs. She has regularly contributed to international television and print media, including the Guardian. Al-Rasheed has appeared on Newshour (BBC), Radio 4 (Documentary on Saudi Arabia: Sand of Time), and has been interviewed by CNN, BBC World Service, CCTV, and al-Hura Arabic television. She has also continued to write op-eds in Al-Monitor and other media.

Al-Rasheed has attended several international conferences in Europe, the USA and the Middle East, where she's presented papers on her current research. She also gave seminars at Harvard University, Kennedy School Middle East Initiative and contributed to the 2015 Summer School Teaching at Alpbach, Austria organised by the European Forum. Al-Rasheed also ran a one-week seminar on Religion: Inequality and Equality. She continues to carry out consultancy work for governments, non-government international organisations and business in the UK and elsewhere.

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Date and Time
November 23, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Priming Collective Action on Social Media: An Examination of Movement Social Learning in the UK People’s Assembly

Dan Mercea
City, University of London, U.K.

Politics Beyond the State: Politics in the Internet Era Series

Dr. Dan Mercea is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at City, University of London, he coordinates the postgraduate programmes in Sociology and is the Course Director of the MA Media and Communications.


Mercea received his PhD in communication studies from the Department of Sociology, University of York. Before the completion of his doctorate he became Teaching Fellow in Political Sociology at York. From September 2011 to September 2013 he was Senior Lecturer in Politics at The Hague University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands. During that time, he was also Visiting Lecturer in Political Communication at the Catholic University of Lille, France where he continues to be Associate Research Fellow. In May-July 2015 he was visiting scientist at the University of Sassari, Italy where he co-organised the Information, Communication and Society symposium 'Protest Participation in Variable Communication Ecologies: Meanings, Modalities and Implications'. In 2016, he was an Advanced Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Babes-Bolyai University, Romania. Starting from January 2017, he is social media editor of the international journal Information, Communication and Society.


Dr. Mercea has a lasting interest in the implications of new media usage, the adoption and repurposing of Internet technologies in various domains of social and political activity as captured by multiple analytical perspectives including those in social movement, political behaviour, political and social psychology, science and technology studies. More specifically, his theoretical preoccupations have converged on cultural aspects of mobilization into collective action and informal civic learning; media theory with an emphasis on (new) media practices; democratic theory chiefly with reference to deliberative and participatory models of political engagement and finally sociological theory probing the interplay between technological innovation and social transformation.


His empirical research has concentrated on participation in contentious politics. In his recent studies, he has focused on the impact of networked communication on individual involvement in physical protest; on notions of shared collective identities among networked participants and finally, on organizational changes among digitally connected activist groups.


His publications include Mercea, D. and Yilmaz, K. "Movement Social Learning on Twitter: The Case of the People's Assembly" in The Sociological Review (2017); Mercea, D., Karatas, D. and Bastos, M.T. "Persistent Activist Communication in Occupy Gezi" in Sociology(2017); Civic participation in contentious politics: The digital foreshadowing of protest (2016); Nixon, P., Rawal, R. and Mercea, D. (Eds.) Politics and the Internet in Comparative Context: Views from the Cloud, Routledge (2013).

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Date and Time
November 20, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Taking Soft Power Seriously

Paul Sellers
British Council, Italy

Hard Power/Soft Power in Global Politics Series

Paul Sellers is the Director of the British Council in Italy and Cultural Counsellor to the British Embassy, based in Rome.

Paul Sellers is a cultural relations professional with over 25 years' experience in the field. A graduate in Economics from Manchester University and a qualified teacher, Sellers has worked for the British Council as a teacher, manager, and Director for much of his career, with assignments in Spain, Mexico, Cyprus, Greece, the UAE and India.

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Date and Time
November 16, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

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Corporate Risk, Business & Human Rights. Growing Responsibilities in a Changing World (Part IV of a Four-part Series)

Corporate Accountability: The Increasing Role of Civil Society, Activist Investors, Lawyers and Governments
Nina L. Gardner
Strategy International; Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Business and human rights is at the cornerstone of some of the most difficult challenges corporations, lawyers, investors, civil society representatives and legislators face today. This series of lectures/mini-course will provide an introduction to this emerging and rapidly evolving field, and to the developing international movement to encourage companies to take responsibility for their human rights impacts. The series starts with an overview of the governance gap regarding corporate behavior in the international regulatory framework, and covers the rapidly developing norms and regulations designed to improve business conduct. The following lectures will examine the developing responsibility of companies regarding labor issues in their supply chains, and the particularly difficult human rights challenges that affect the extractive sector. The series will close by considering the critical role of various stakeholders, particularly activist investors, in holding corporations more accountable. The object of this lecture series is to introduce students and faculty to this field, generate lively discussion regarding the role and responsibilities of corporations, and highlight the risk corporations take when human rights impacts are not adequately addressed.

NINA L. GARDNER

Nina L. Gardner is the director of Strategy International, a consulting firm she founded in 2000 specializing in advising corporations on CSR partnerships, establishing internal global sustainability and human rights procedures, and providing outreach to socially responsible investors. Past clients have included major multinational corporations like Pfizer and Enel, and international organizations such as the OECD.

A lawyer by training (which included a semester working on the Bhopal case with an Indian public interest firm), she practiced corporate law in Washington DC. In 1996 she joined the UN as a political officer in their Zagreb liaison office, reporting on human rights violations in postwar Croatia. She also worked as an advisor to the OECD project "Measuring the Progress of Society" offering alternatives to GDP as a measure of development and government performance. Her varied professional experiences convinced her that the best way to effectuate change is to encourage the public, private sector and civil society to work together – and that business can turn human rights and environmental challenges into growth opportunities.

Ms. Gardner is an activist in women's issues – and is the founding president of three professional women's associations in Europe (Prague, Paris, Rome). She is on the advisory board of the Women's Forum for the Economy in Society and the Harvard Coalition for Responsible Investment. She is a graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe, Columbia Law School and was a Rotary scholar at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotà, Colombia. Ms. Gardner is fluent in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, and is a member of the New York Bar and the Council on Foreign Relations. She taught Business & Human Rights from 2019-2012 at Washington College of Law at American University, and has been teaching at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington DC since 2013.

Gardner Mini-course Fall 2017.pdf

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Date and Time
November 16, 2017
10:30am - 12:30pm Local Time

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