Central Asia’s Global Authoritarian Spaces: Politics and Contestation Outside of a Closed Region

Alexander Cooley
Harriman Institute, Columbia University, U.S.

Constitutional Developments in Central Asia Series

Alexander Cooley is Director of Columbia University's Harriman Institute for the study of Russia, Eurasia and Eastern Europe and the Claire Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Professor Cooley's research examines how external actors– including international organizations, multinational companies, NGOs, and foreign military bases – have influenced the development and sovereignty of the former Soviet states, with a focus on Central Asia and the Caucasus.

His books include Base Politics: Democratic Change and the US Military Overseas and Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest for Central Asia (Oxford 2012). He also is the co-author (with John Heathershaw) of Dictators without Borders: Power and Money in Central Asia (Yale 2017).

In addition to his academic research, Professor Cooley serves on several international advisory and policy committees and has testified for the United States Congress, the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission and briefed US and international officials on Eurasian politics. Cooley earned both his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

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Date and Time
January 30, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


SESAME: A Large Scientific Infrastructure as a Tool for Diplomacy in the Middle East

Chris Llewellyn Smith, Raffaella Del Sarto, Romano Prodi

Chris Llewellyn Smith
President, SESAME - Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East, Jordan

Raffaella Del Sarto
Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe, Italy

Romano Prodi (Chair)
Foundation for World Wide Cooperation, Italy

Organized by the Foundation for World Wide Cooperation, in partnership with the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe

CHRIS LLEWELLYN SMITH

Chris Llewellyn Smith is the President of SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East), Jordan.


Smith is also Director of Energy Research at the University of Oxford; Former Director-General of European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and Chairman of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Council.


http://www.sesame.org.jo/sesame/

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Date and Time
January 27, 2017
5:30pm - 7:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Emerging Populism and Foreign Policy

Christopher J. Hill
Wilson E. Schmidt Distinguished Professor (effective 1 January 2017), Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.K.

Christopher J. Hill is incoming Wilson E. Schmidt Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is Sir Patrick Sheehy Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at the University of Cambridge. Previously he was Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. Hill is the author of many books in the areas of foreign policy analysis and general international relations, including most recently The National Interest in Question: Foreign Policy in Multicultural Societies (Oxford University Press, 2013) and National and European Foreign Policies: Towards Europeanization (Edited with Reuben Wong, 2011).

Hill's research focuses on foreign policy analysis and the international politics of Europe (including both the EU's external relations and the foreign policies of the Member States), as well as general international relations, theories and practice. He continues to work on the subject of his recent book, that is the relationship between social diversity and international relations, and is extending this into the international politics of migration.

He is former Chair of the British International Studies Association and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2007. He has been an elected Council Member at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, and a member of many editorial advisory boards including those of the Journal of Common Market Studies, the British Journal of Political Science, International Affairs and Critique Internationale.

Hill received both his MA and DPhil degree from the University of Oxford. He has held visiting positions at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., the Department of Government at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, the European University Institute, Florence, the Università di Catania, the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, the University of California at San Diego, the Università di Siena and St. Antony's College, Oxford.

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Date and Time
October 14, 2016
5:45pm - 7:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


South Lebanon As a Vantage Point for the Processes of B/ordering

Daniel Meier
The Graduate Institute, Switzerland

The Middle East: A Region in Upheaval Series

This presentation will discuss one of the most enduring front-line borderlands in the Middle East. Located at one of the major axes of confrontation between the Arab world and Israel, South Lebanon is a vantage point for observing several processes of border change in terms of political belonging, military battleground and cultural space. Inspired by the theoretical framework of political geographers in border studies, this talk will examine the border as a process. While it is understood that borders are human constructions, their changing and mobile characteristics are usually underestimated. Their relationships with policies of control and identity production seem evident but lack appropriate conceptual tools, mainly in the Middle East where border studies could be helpful in the present context. The case study of South Lebanon - the result of 5 years of postdoctoral research - intends to highlight those dimensions, using the three notions of "bordering", "ordering" and "othering" which allow us to show the actors' effects on the borderland as well as the impact of the border on those actors. The contemporary political history of South Lebanon provides us with a period of time in which several major actors took part in the process of border shaping. The presentation will therefore describe the role and scope of the Lebanese State, the Palestinian Resistance, Israel, Hizbullah and the UNIFIL mission in this process.

DANIEL MEIER

Daniel Meier received his PhD in political science from the Graduate Institute in Geneva. He was awarded research grants from Francophony, the Swiss National Fund and the Centre for Lebanese Studies in Oxford. After several years of fieldwork in Lebanon and Iraq, he joined the research team of the EUborderscapes program as a CNRS research fellow. During these years he was affiliated with the French Institute in Beirut, St. Antony's College in Oxford, Queen's University in Belfast and the Universite' Grenoble Alpes (UGA) in France. His research topics include borders, identities, and conflicts in Lebanon, as well as Palestinian and Syrian refugee issues in the Middle East. He currently teaches at the Institute of Political Studies in Grenoble and at the Arabic Department of the University of Geneva. He has published numerous papers in French and English journals and edited a special issue of Mediterranean Politics (2013) on Lebanon's borders and boundaries. His most recent book is entitled Shaping Lebanon's Borderlands: Armed Resistance and International Intervention in South Lebanon (IB Tauris, 2016).

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Date and Time
September 29, 2016
7:30pm - 9:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


SAIS Faculty Panel on Brexit

David W. Ellwood, Charles Gati, Erik Jones, Adrian Lyttelton, Matthias Matthijs

David W. Ellwood
Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Italy

Charles Gati
Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Erik Jones
Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Adrian Lyttelton
Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Italy

Matthias Matthijs
Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Understanding the New Europe Series

DAVID W. ELLWOOD

David W. Ellwood is Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe.

Formerly Associate Professor of Contemporary International History at the University of Bologna (until November 2012); has served as president of the International Association for Media and History (1996-2002); Ph.D., Italian studies, University of Reading.

Publications: The Shock of America: Europe and the Challenge of the Century (Oxford University Press, 2012) (Italian edition, Carocci Editore, 2012) (second edition 2016); The Movies as History: Visions of the 20th Century, editor (Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2000); Hollywood in Europe: Experiences of a Cultural Hegemony (VU University Press, 1994); Rebuilding Europe: The U.S. and the Reconstruction of Western Europe (Pearson Longman Publishing, 1992) (Italian edition, Il Mulino 1996); Hollywood in Europa: Industria, Politica, Pubblico del Cinema 1945-1960¸ with G. Brunetta (Casa Usher, 1991); Italy 1943-45: The Politics of Liberation (Leicester University Press, 1985). Frequent contributor of articles and reviews to academic journals, policy forums and news outlets.

ERIK JONES

Erik Jones is Director of European and Eurasian Studies and Professor of European Studies and International Political Economy at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS. He is also Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College in Oxford, United Kingdom. Professor Jones teaches on topics in international and comparative political economy with a particular focus on Europe and the transatlantic relationship.

Professor Jones is a frequent commentator on European politics and political economy whose contributions have been published in, among others, Financial Times, New York Times, USA Today, and newspapers and magazines across Europe. He has written extensively on European monetary integration and macroeconomic governance and has been active in public debates about the European response to the global economic and financial crisis. Professor Jones is co-editor of Government and Opposition and he is a contributing editor to the Institute for International and Strategic Studies journal Survival.

Jones earned his AB at Princeton University (1988) and his MA and PhD at Johns Hopkins SAIS (1990, 1996). Prior to joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins, he worked at the Centre for European Policy Studies, the Central European University and the University of Nottingham. A US citizen, Jones has lived in Europe for the last twenty-five years.

Publications: Jones is author of The Politics of Economic and Monetary Union (2002), Economic Adjustment and Political Transformation in Small States (2008), and, together with Dana Allin, Weary Policeman: American Power in an Age of Austerity (2012). His most recent book is a collection of short essays called The Year the European Crisis Ended (2014). He is editor or co-editor of more than twenty books or special issues of journals on topics related to European politics and political economy including The Oxford Handbook of the European Union (2012) and The Oxford Handbook of Italian Politics (2015).

CHARLES GATI

Charles Gati is a former senior advisor with the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State and a former professor at Union College and Columbia University.

His books Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt (2006) and Hungary and the Soviet Bloc (1986) were each honored with the Marshall Shulman Prize for outstanding book on the international relations of the former Soviet bloc by the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies> He is the only author to have won this prize twice. His most recent work, released in 2013, is titled ZBIG: The Strategy and Statecraft of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Dr. Gati also leads the bi-weekly, non-credit Current Events series for EES concentrators and other interested students.

ADRIAN LYTTELTON

Adrian Lyttelton is Senior Associate Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe.

Background and Education: Visiting professor at the American Academy in Rome (Fall 2003); visiting professor at the Department of History, University of California, Berkeley (1997 and 2000); professor of European history, University of Pisa (1990-2000); associate of the Center for European Studies at Harvard University (1987); member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton (1985-86); academic director of Research Institute, Bologna Center (1980-85); acting director, European program, SAIS Washington (Spring 1983); professor of history at the SAIS Bologna Center (1979-90); professor of modern history at the University of Reading, UK (1976-79); B.A. (Honours) in Modern History, Magdalen College, Oxford University (UK); fellow, All Souls College, Oxford (UK); fellow of St. Antony's College, Oxford.

Publications: "Futurism, Politics, and Society," in Italian Futurism 1909-1944 (2014); The Seizure of Power: Fascism in Italy 1919-1929 (1973, 2nd edition 1988, 3rd edition 2004) - Italian translation, La conquista del potere (1974); editor of the volume on "Liberal and Fascist Italy," in Short Oxford History of Italy (2002); "Creating a National Past: History, Myth and Image in the Risorgimento," in Making and Remaking Italy, (2001); "La dittatura fascista," in Storia d'Italia (1997); "Society and Politics - 1860-1915," in Oxford Illustrated History of Italy (1997); "The National Question in Italy," in The National Question in Europe (1990); "Society and Culture in the Italy of Giolitti," in Italian Art in the 20th Century (1989); The Language of Political Conflict in Pre-Fascist Italy, Bologna Center Occasional Paper (1988); editor of Italian Fascisms (1973).

MATTHIAS MATTHIJS

Matthias Matthijs is Assistant Professor of International Political Economy at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS in Washington, DC.

He teaches graduate courses in International Relations, International Economics and Comparative Politics while his research focuses on the politics of economic crises, the role of economic ideas in economic policymaking, the politics of inequality, and the erosion of democratic legitimacy in advanced industrial states. He is the recipient of a 2015 Johns Hopkins Catalyst Award in recognition of his work as a promising early-career investigator. At SAIS, he was awarded the Max M. Fisher Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2011 and 2015.

He is editor (with Mark Blyth) of the book The Future of the Euro published by Oxford University Press in April 2015, and author of Ideas and Economic Crises in Britain from Attlee to Blair (1945-2005), published by Routledge in 2011. The latter is based on his PhD dissertation, which received the Samuel H. Beer Prize for Best Dissertation in British Politics by a North American scholar, awarded by the British Politics Group of the American Political Science Association in 2010. Matthijs is also the author of several articles on western economic decline, the politics of money, the euro crisis and European political economy published or forthcoming in journals like Foreign Affairs, the Journal of Democracy, Politics & Society, the Journal of European Public Policy, the Journal of European Integration, The International Spectator, Survival, and Current History.

He previously taught at American University's School of International Service (from 2008 to 2012) in Washington, DC, and was a visiting assistant professor at SAIS Europe in Bologna (spring 2010). He has also served as a consultant for the World Bank's Foreign Investment Advisory Service (FIAS) from 2005 to 2007 and for the Economist Intelligence Unit from 2009 to 2011. He is a frequent commentator on international affairs in U.S. media, including The Washington Post, NPR's All Things Considered and Marketplace, CNBC's Nightly Business Report, Voice of America, Canada's CTV, as well as European and Asian media.

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Date and Time
September 26, 2016
7:30pm - 9:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Industrial Policy in the Gulf Cooperation Council

Raed Safadi
Chief Economic Adviser to the Government of Dubai

International Commercial Policy Series

Raed Safadi is the Chief Economic Adviser at Dubai's Department of Economic Development.

He began working at the OECD in 1993, and from 2009 to 2015 was Deputy-Director of the Trade and Agriculture Department at the OECD. Prior to that Dr. Safadi was Chief Economist at Dubai's DED 2008-09. He started his career at the World Bank in 1985, first as a research, then as an operations economist. He has been a consultant for governments, regional development banks and UN agencies on trade, macroeconomic and structural reforms.

Dr. Safadi holds a Ph.D. in economics, and has published an extensive array of books and articles covering such areas as economic development, regional trading arrangements and the world trading system. His most recent publication Inclusive Global Value Chains, written in conjunction with colleagues from the World Bank, focuses on making GVCs more inclusive by overcoming participation constraints for SMEs, and facilitating access for low-income developing countries.

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Date and Time
September 22, 2016
7:30pm - 9:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Politica in Italia/Italian Politics

Edited by Carolyn Forestiere and Filippo Tronconi

Organized by Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Istituto Carlo Cattaneo and Dipartimento di Scienze Politiche e Sociali, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Italy.

The workshop will be held both in Italian and English

SEE ATTACHED PROGRAM

Pre-registration is required (SAIS EU faculty and students included) by November 15 to RSVP@JHUBC.IT

PIT 2018 Poster.pdf

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Date and Time
November 18, 2017
9:00am - 4:45pm Local Time

Campus


Location


National Security in the Age of America First

Mara Karlin
Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Strategic Studies Series

Dr. Mara Karlin joined the Johns Hopkins SAIS faculty as Associate Professor of the Practice of Strategic Studies in June 2017. She also serves as associate director of the school's Strategic Studies Program and executive director of The Merrill Center for Strategic Studies.


Karlin has served in national security roles for five U.S. Secretaries of Defense, advising on policies spanning strategic planning, defense budgeting, future wars and the evolving security environment, and regional affairs involving the Middle East, Europe, and Asia.


Most recently, she served as the deputy assistant secretary of defense for strategy &force development. In that role, her office crafted strategies for navigating the future of international security—including through the analysis of future wars— as a means to guiding the development of a prepared, capable, and effective U.S. military. She oversaw and implemented the overarching policy and strategy guidance that shapes the Department's more than $550 billion budget. Karlin was a key architect of several mission-critical strategies, including the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), the president's 2015 National Security Strategy, the counter-ISIL strategy, two classified secretary of defense-signed strategies on long-term global challenges, and three Defense Planning Guidance. She led three reviews on strategic portfolios focused on power projection, which guided more than $20 billion in investments and directed a groundbreaking study assessing the current policy and implications of lethal autonomous weapons. She inaugurated the first three initiatives to shape close allies' defense strategies and budgets, and oversaw the first formal efforts to actively assess the defense strategy.


Previously, Karlin served in a variety of policy positions in the Department of Defense. As special assistant to the under secretary of defense for policy, she facilitated the under secretary's efforts on hundreds of national security-related actions with an emphasis on Middle East security affairs. As Levant director, she formulated U.S. policy on Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel-Palestinian affairs. This included inaugurating a program to build the Lebanese military, coordinating nascent defense relations between the United States and Lebanon, deepening defense cooperation with Jordan, expanding security sector reform in the Palestinian arena, and a wide range of efforts involving Syria and Iran. As South Asia country director, she formulated U.S. policy on India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh, focusing on terrorism, governability, security sector reform, and nonproliferation.


Over the last decade, she has taught courses in Strategic Studies, Middle East Affairs, and U.S. Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University and on Semester at Sea (through Colorado State University). Her first book, Building Militaries in Fragile States: Challenges for the United States, will be published by University of Pennsylvania Press in 2017.


She received her BA summa cum laude in Political Science from Newcomb College, Tulane University; MA with distinction in Strategic Studies, Middle East Studies, and Economics from Johns Hopkins SAIS; and PhD in International Relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS. Karlin has been awarded Department of Defense Medals for Meritorious and Outstanding Public Service, among others.

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Date and Time
December 18, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Middle-East Challenges Facing the US Administration

Vali Nasr
Dean, Johns Hopkins University SAIS, U.S.

Vali R. Nasr is Dean and Professor of International Relations at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS in Washington D.C.

Nasr is a Middle East scholar, foreign policy adviser and commentator on international relations. His most recent book, The Dispensable Nation, deals with the implications of the Obama administration's foreign policy on American strategic interests. His previous books, Forces of Fortune and The Shia Revival, examined the postwar sectarian violence in Iraq and the Arab Spring uprising and contributed to U.S. policy formulated in response to those events. Prior to being named Dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS, Nasr was a professor of international politics at Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. From 2009 to 2011, he was the special adviser to the President's special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan; he served on the faculties of the Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford University, the University of California, San Diego and the University of San Diego; he was a Carnegie scholar and a senior fellow at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He also served as an adjunct senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution. Nasr is currently a member of the U.S. Department of State's Foreign Affairs Policy Board; a director of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund; and a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He received a PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Publications: The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat (2013); Forces of Fortune: The Rise of the New Muslim Middle Class and What It Will Mean for Our World (2009); Democracy in Iran: History and the Quest for Liberty, co-author (2006); The Shia Revival: How Conflicts Within Islam Will Shape the Future (2006); Islamic Leviathan: Islam and the Making of State Power (2001); Mawdudi and the Making of Islamic Revivalism (1996); The Vanguard of the Islamic Revolution: Jama'at-i Islami of Pakistan (1994); numerous articles in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs and other publications.

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Date and Time
December 4, 2017
6:30pm - 8:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


The New Continental Cold War: Russia, the EU and Europe's Eastern Crisis

Paolo Calzini
Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe, Italy

Paolo Calzini is Senior Associate Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe and Research Consultant at the Istituto Affari Internazionali.

Calzini served as research fellow at the Bundesinstitut für Ostwissenschaftliche und Internationale Studien, and the Istituto per gli Studi di Politica Internazionale (ISPI), Milan. He is a former professor at the University of Milan, the University of Bologna, the Istituto Universitario Orientale, the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) and at SAIS. Calzini has been a guest lecturer at numerous universities and institutes, including the NATO Defense College, the Freie Universität, Wilton Park, European Forum Alpach, the Gorbachev Foundation, the Istituto Diplomatico degli Esteri and the Scuola dell'Amministrazione della Presidenza del Consiglio. Calzini has a degree in comparative law from the University of Milan and carried out graduate studies at Columbia University, New York.

He is the author of: "La Russia al centro," in il Mulino (2016); "Molto di nuovo sul fronte nord orientale," in il Mulino (2015); "Il caso della Crimea: autodeterminazione, secessione e annessione," in Istituzioni del Federalismo (2014); "La Russia, grande potenza regionale," in Quaderni di Relazioni Internazionali (2011); "La guerra Russia-Georgia: il ritorno del nazionalismo russo," in Quaderni di Relazioni Internazionali (2009); "Democrazia e sovranità nella Russia di Putin," in Quaderni di Relazioni Internazionali (2007); "L'Ordine Internazionale," in Società per lo Studio e la Diffusione della Democrazia (2007); "Vladimir Putin e la guerra cecena," in Il Mulino (2005); Gorbachev and Eastern Europe (1989); "La rivoluzione russa: prodromi e premesse," in Nuove Questioni di Storia Contemporanea (1968); Coesistenza e rivoluzione: documenti della disputa cino-sovietica, co-editor (1964).

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Date and Time
November 23, 2017
10:30am - 12:00pm Local Time

Campus


Location


Pages