Conflict Management

Conflict Management Program

Focuses on mechanisms for handling international conflict.
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WELCOME from Daniel Serwer, Program Director

It is an honor and privilege to lead the Johns Hopkins SAIS Conflict Management Program founded by Bill Zartman and directed in recent years by Terry Hopmann, who is devoting himself more fully to research.
 
Today’s world is one ripe for the kinds of engagement that are at the heart of conflict management as taught and practiced by the school and its alumni. Military power will remain important in framing and enabling how the world evolves, but unless we get better at the civilian side of things it is difficult to see how this world’s problems can be effectively managed.
 
The school's Conflict Management program is among the very best programs of its kind, if not the best, so my job is first and foremost to keep it that way, improving its performance and amplifying its impact under tight resource constraints. Bill and Terry are continuing to teach, as are the other faculty. That high-quality continuity is an enormous plus.
 
Negotiation has been the mainstay of the program. We will continue to support publication of the journal International Negotiation, run the Workshop on International Negotiation, engage with the local community through PeacekidZ, and join with others to sponsor the Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum. The Field Trip—to a still undetermined location this winter—will also continue. At the same time, I’ll hope we branch out as resources allow: countering violent extremism and dealing with internal conflict are subjects we might want to beef up.
 
The Conflict Management program focuses on mechanisms for handling international conflict, both between and within states, and developing cooperation. The program presents various theoretical approaches to understanding conflict and its causes, tools to manage conflicts, and the exploration of the formation and use of international organizations and regimes to mitigate conflict.

I look forward to working with colleagues and students in Washington and Bologna as well as alumni around the world to improve the prospects for peaceful resolution of heartfelt and too often lucrative disputes. We owe it to the world and to ourselves.



 
 
Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Tunisia, Jan 2012
Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Azerbaijan, Jan 2013
Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Mindanao, Philippines, Jan 2011
Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Mindanao, Philippines, Jan 2014
Mindanao: Understanding Conflict 2014 - Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Mindanao
Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Mindanao, Philippines, Jan 2014
Conflict Management Program: Mentoring and Networking Event - Feb 2014
Colombia: Understanding Conflict - Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Colombia - 2015
The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform
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Faculty

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Program Activities

 

Conflict Management Field Trip

Twelve to 15 students selected through an essay application process participate in a research trip to a designated conflict or post-conflict region during the winter intersession. During the trip, students interview local government officials and representatives of the international community, NGOs, academia and the media in order to assess the role of the international community and prospects for progress in the region. Upon return, students prepare an extensive report of their analysis and conclusions.

To view previous trip reports, please click here.
 

Co-Curricular Activities

The program occasionally organizes an international conference on a topic related to conflict management. A series of lectures outside of courses and other various activities are held throughout the year.

 

Conflict Management Internships

An internship is highly recommended for Conflict Management students. A number of Washington, DC, agencies offer internships each year in the field of conflict management. Consult the program office for information.

Curriculum

 

Conflict Management | MA Academic Requirements

Conflict Management Program Goals and Objectives

Entering Class 2015-2016

Students must take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate.  Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 courses (48 credits) or 14 courses (56 credits) as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

Students concentrating in Conflict Management (CM) must take at least 4 courses within this program. Only one of the four required CM courses may be cross-listed, starting with a prefix other than SA.640.XXX. The course Principles and Practices of Conflict Management (SA.640.718) is strongly encouraged for all students in their first year of study who have not taken a similar course.

 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Students must also fulfill the general requirements for International Relations (IR) which include 2 additional courses within IR from two different IR or selected Policy areas other than CM. These areas include:

IR Areas:
·         Global Theory and History
·         International Law and Organizations
·         International Political Economy
Policy Areas:
·         Energy, Resources and Environment
·         Strategic Studies
 
IR students studying at SAIS Europe must take at least three IR courses in Washington with the exception of dual-degree or advanced-standing students, who need must take at least two IR courses in Washington.

 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students must complete 4 courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

Students must receive a 2.67 average in the 4 required economics courses or they must retake a course(s) until a 2.67 average is obtained. If any of the 4 courses are achieved by passing a waiver exam or during Pre-Term, the student must substitute an economics elective course(s) in place of the waived course(s) in order to fulfill the economics requirement above. In this case, the school will use the highest economics program elective course grade(s) to compute this average if a student is replacing one or more of the 4 required courses of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Trade Theory or International Monetary Theory.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students must complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses in addition to their concentration requirements. CM concentrators must pass Theories of International Relations as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language. This language must be offered at the school. Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language. All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering, even if not using English for proficiency.

 

CAPSTONE

Conflict Management concentrators must produce a research paper of publishable quality completed during their final semester from previous work of one of the four Conflict Management courses required above. It must be approved in final form in order to take the MA Oral Exam to compete for honors (if eligible) and to graduate. A prize for the best program paper is awarded at graduation. This requirement is normally fulfilled by:
 
1.     Taking and passing Capstone Research Seminar (SA.640.800); or
2.     Taking and passing Negotiation Practicum (SA.640.749)—when offered
3.     Taking and passing Patterns of Protest & Revolt (SA.640.762); second-year students only; or
4.     Producing a research paper of publishable quality not associated with a class, during a student’s final semester.* This requires approval from the Program Director and is not eligible to receive the “best paper” award. A draft is due by April 1, and final paper by May 1.
 
*For those whose final semester is fall, consult the Program Director for due date.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2014-2015
Entering Class 2013-2014
Entering Class 2012-2013
Entering Class 2011-2012
Entering Class 2010-2011
Entering Class 2009-2010

Minor

Conflict Management Minor Requirements: (as of AY 15/16)

  • 3 Conflict Management courses in total
  • 1 of the 3 courses must be either Principles and Practices of Conflict Management (SA.640.718) or International Bargaining and Negotiation (SA.640.719); if course is waived, student must replace with an alternate Conflict Management course that has a prefix of SA.640.XXX
  • 2 additional Conflict Management courses, of which, 1 must have a Conflict Management prefix SA.640.XXX and the other may be cross-listed with Conflict Management
  • Passing Theories of International Relations as one of the two core requirements is highly recommended

General Minor Requirements:

  • Minors are optional (like specializations)
  • A student can minor in only one area
  • A student cannot pursue a minor in International Economics or IR/General, but can pursue a Specialization in International Economics
  • Minors consist of three courses
  • Some minors will have a required course(s)
  • Some minors will have an “anchor” course or cross-listed course that counts toward both the concentration and the minor which reduces the three additional required courses to two, as the third will overlap both programs; in the IR or Asia concentrations, the course must be from the primary concentration area (Conflict Management, Global Theory and History, China, Japan, etc.) and not from the two additional required courses across the other IR or Asia areas
  • Regional minors may require language study or proficiency in the language of that region
  • A student can declare a minor at any time—prior to graduation
  • Students who are pursuing a minor in a program will not have bidding priority in that program (only concentrators)

To add or change a minor, please click HERE.

Events

2016
Jul
21
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: Opportunities for Improving Muslim and Non-Muslim Relations in the US and Abroad
9:30am - 10:30am

1 in 5 American Muslims reported experiencing religious discrimination in a recent poll conducted by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. In the aftermath of attacks from Boston and Orlando to Paris and Baghdad, many Americans fear acts of violent extremism, and this has led to fear and mistrust of Muslims among some communities. At the same time, domestic and international counterterrorism and counter radicalization efforts have also at times led to feelings of discrimination and marginalization by Muslim individuals and communities. Fear and mistrust between non-Muslim and Muslim communities is a real challenge, yet opportunities exist to improve relations between these communities and foster positive policies and actions to support religious tolerance and security in the US.

Join the Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum for a discussion with a panel of experts who will outline the current context of Muslim and non-Muslim relations and share policy priorities and strategies for reducing these tensions.

Jul
15
After Fallujah: Security, Governance, and the Next Battle Against ISIS
12:00pm - 1:30pm

Iraqi forces have expelled the Islamic State (ISIS) from Fallujah, but difficult work lies ahead to retake the territory still under ISIS control, provide security, and rebuild. Restoring government and the rule of law, returning the displaced, and rebuilding homes and infrastructure will be crucial for sustaining the victory. Who will have the power and legitimacy to manage local resources and services? What will it take for civilians to return? Can the Popular Mobilization Forces that played an important role in the liberation of Fallujah be demobilized or absorbed into the army, or will they remain independent power centers?

The Middle East Institute (MEI) and the Conflict Management Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) are pleased to host Robert S. Ford (MEI), Charles Lister (MEI), Jessica Lewis McFate (Institute for the Study of War), and Douglas Ollivant (New America) for a discussion of these and other questions regarding the aftermath of Fallujah, how ISIS may react in defeat, and the challenges ahead facing the liberation of Mosul.

Daniel Serwer (MEI and SAIS) will moderate the discussion with our other expert panelists.

Jul
7
Voices from the Middle East: The Israeli and Palestinian Narratives of New Story Leadership (NSL)
9:00am - 1:00pm

New Story Leadership (NSL), partnering with SAIS, is proud to announce a special half-day conference featuring inspiring presentations from young leaders from Israel and Palestine who are living and working together for the summer here in Washington. They will share their insights about the on-going Israeli-Palestinian conflict and field questions from the audience in an effort to unearth how this emerging generation of young adults from the Middle East is thinking about their future, and the future of their region. The conference will also include two expert panels featuring distinguished professors and other qualified professionals from the region who will contribute their own experiences to the discussion on the conflict. 

The younger generations of Egypt, Tunisia and other countries in North Africa and the Middle East have decisively spoken up for change, demanding new leadership, greater freedom, and the right to choose their own futures. Now the younger generation of the most conflicted zone in the region also wants to speak for change, to engage you in the new conversation by sharing their stories and their hopes for peace.

If you are tired of the old story of the Middle East, of failed peace attempts and stalled negotiations, come and hear fresh voices, voices that insist on being heard because it is their future that is being shaped by conversations conducted in Washington. They are demanding a say for themselves and on-behalf of their generation.

This year, we are inspired by the words of Senator Robert Kennedy, “Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”

May
5
Culture in Crisis: Preserving Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones.
12:30pm - 2:00pm

A panel discussion by Johns Hopkins SAIS Conflict Management MA candidates on preserving cultural heritage in conflict zones. 

May
3
Arab Spring: Negotiating in the Shadow of the Intifadat
4:30pm - 6:00pm

Panel discussion on Prof. Zartman's recent book on the Arab Spring: Negotiating in the Shadow of the Intifadat.

Apr
22
A World in Change - A UN in Progress
10:30am - 11:30am

The Conflict Management Program, European and Eurasian Studies Program, International Law Program, Center for Transatlantic Relations, and the Global Security and Conflict Management Club invite you to a talk with Ambassador Natalia Gherman, candidate for the UN Secretary General and former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and European Integration of the Republic of Moldova. 

 The discussion will touch on the existing geostrategic challenges and the capacity of the UN to respond and adapt. 

Ambassador Gherman has previously served as Chief Negotiator on behalf of the Republic of Moldova for the Association Agreement with the European Union and Ambassador to Austria/OSCE, Sweden, Norway and Finland.

Apr
21
Protecting Cultural Artifacts: Why it Matters for U.S. Foreign Policy
12:30pm - 1:30pm

The U.S. government has a long history of protecting cultural heritage around the world, but today, these efforts are more central to U.S. foreign policy and national security than ever before.

Apr
18
A Conversation on Jerusalem and the Peace Process
12:00pm - 2:00pm

Daniel Seidemann, founder of Terrestial Jerusalem will speak on this topic. 

Apr
18
The UN in the New Age: Lecture by Igor Luksic
10:00am - 11:00am

The Conflict Management Program, International Law Program, Center for Transatlantic Relations, and the Global Security & Conflict Management Club invite you to a lecture by Igor Luksic, candidate for the UN Secretary General and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Montenegro, on the future of the UN, as well as the main challenges and opportunities for the organisation from the South-East European perspective. Foreign Minister Luksic has previously served as the Minister of Finance and Prime Minister of Montenegro.

Apr
15
Trouble in the Tribe - Book Event
11:45am - 1:45pm

The Middle East Institute (MEI), the Foundation for Middle East Peace, and the Conflict Management Program of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) are pleased to host Dov Waxman (Northeastern University) and Ilan Peleg (Lafayette College, MEI) for a discussion of Dr. Waxman's new book, Trouble in the Tribe: The American Jewish Conflict over Israel.

Drawing on in-depth interviews with American Jewish leaders and activists, Waxman analyzes the growing debate within the community about Israeli policies, especially Israel's treatment of Palestinians. His book examines how disagreements over Israel are impacting Jewish communities, national organizations, and advocacy groups in the United States. Waxman illustrates these differences in the context of broader cultural, political, institutional, and demo graphic changes happening in the American Jewish community. Ilan Peleg will offer his commentary and analysis. Daniel Serwer (SAIS and MEI) will moderate the event.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing at the event. 

Apr
14
A Day in A Life
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Johns Hopkins SAIS Alumnus, Asbjorn Wee, Senior Specialist, FCV, World Bank, will discuss his career path at the OECD and World Bank in the conflict management field.

Apr
12
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: Preventing Mass Atrocities and Deadly Conflict
9:30am - 11:00am

As we look around the world today, the question of how to prevent mass atrocities and deadly conflict is undeniably relevant. From Central African Republic Syria to Myanmar, international actors are seeking to understand what has worked in the past and what can be done in the future to protect civilians. They are faced with a number of key questions arise relating to this topic: How does prevention work, both at a policy and at an operational level? What can be done when usual practices fail? What are examples of past successes? What mechanisms for prevention exist and at what stages of conflict? How can prevention be measured?

In recognition of April as Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month, the Conflict Resolution and Prevention Forum will bring together a distinguished group of panelists to examine how to prevent mass atrocities and deadly conflict. Panelists will speak about the latest research, practices, and policies shaping this field and will engage with the audience about the future of prevention. Dr. William Zartman, Professor Emeritus at Johns Hopkins SAIS, will discuss his new book Preventing Deadly Conflict and the norms, processes, and mechanisms to mitigate the risks of widespread violence. Adrienne Lemon, Design, Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist at Search for Common Ground, will provide case studies from on-the-ground programming in high risk environments, including Central African Republic, Burundi, and South Sudan. An additional panelist will focus on policy initiatives to prevent mass atrocities, including the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act. 

Apr
11
Understanding Conflict: Conflict Management Program Field Trip to Sri Lanka
4:30pm - 7:00pm

In January 2016 sixteen Johns Hopkins SAIS students spent ten days in Sri Lanka interviewing leaders, and members of international organizations and members of the community in Colombo, Mannar and Jaffna.  The objective of the trip was to gain a deeper understanding of the roots of the Sri Lankan conflict; to evaluate the conflict management efforts that have taken place; and finally to present recommendations about how best to advance the process of long-term conflict resolution and peace-building. Students will discuss their findings and present their report.

Mar
30
Casamance - Understanding Conflict: Conflict Management and African Studies Program Field Trip to Senegal
4:30pm - 6:00pm

15 students from the Conflict Management and African Studies Program spent a week in Senegal in January 2016 to get a deeper undestanding of the conflict in Casamance.  Students will present their conclusions and recommendations as they launch their trip report

Feb
25
Recruiting for Jihad: The Allure of ISIS
12:00pm - 1:30pm

The Center for Turkish Studies at the Middle East Institute (MEI) and the Conflict Management Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) are pleased to welcome Charles Lister, Ahmet Sait Yayla, and Anne Speckhard in a discussion about why people take up arms with the Islamic State (ISIS). Its declaration of a caliphate and its glorification of violence in pursuit of its aims have drawn adherents across the socioeconomic spectrum, from the United States and Europe to the Islamic world. Who are the people being recruited as ISIS militants, and why do they join? This expert panel will examine the allure of ISIS in Europe, Turkey, and the Arab world and effective strategies to stem its growth. Daniel Serwer will moderate the discussion. Unfortunately, there will be no lunch provided at this event.

For More Information and to RSVP

Feb
24
National Museum of African American History and Culture - A Place to Remember, Commemorate and Celebrate
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Dean Vali Nasr, the SAIS Africa Association, the SAIS International Law Society and the SAIS International Law & Organizations Program invite you to join them for a conversation in honor of Black History Month with Dr. Jacquelyn Serwer Chief Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Jacquelyn Days Serwer is a curator and art historian who joined the staff of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) as Chief Curator in May 2006. At NMAAHC, she focuses primarily on building the museum’s foundational collection and developing exhibition projects for the near term, as well as planning for the museum’s new building to open on the National Mall in 2016. Previously she served for six years as Chief Curator of the Corcoran Gallery of Art where she coordinated all museum activities. In addition to her own projects, Serwer supervised the museum’s exhibition program and related publications, as well as the in-house and outreach activities of the Education Department. Prior to her tenure at the Corcoran, she served as Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM). Serwer, who taught art history at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Geneva and at BrooklynCollege, received her M.A. from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from the City University of New York. She earned her B.A. at Sarah Lawrence College. Her career as a museum professional began at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  

Feb
22
Russia's Foreign Policy: New Spheres of Influence?
9:00am - 1:00pm

Two years into the conflict in Ukraine and five years into the war in Syria, Russian foreign policy looms larger than ever. Though sanctions have taken a toll, and relations with the West continue to weaken, President Vladimir Putin is doubling down on Russian influence in both Europe and the Middle East. With no end in sight, is a larger clash with the West inevitable? What more can the United States and Europe do to address Russian policies? And what role, if any, should Russia play in resolving the conflicts in Syria and Ukraine?

On Monday, February 22, these questions, and more, will be debated by policymakers, scholars and journalists, including former U.S. Ambassador John Herbst, Buzzfeed World editor Miriam Elder, German Marshall Fund Senior VP Ivan Vejvoda and Transatlantic Senior Fellow Marie Mendras. 

Feb
12
The Yemen Quagmire
12:00pm - 1:30pm

Panelists Amat Alsoswa (Former Yemeni Cabinet Memeber), Leslie Campbell (NDI), Andrew Plitt (USAID), and Charles Schmitz (MEI) will discuss the deepening complexity of the conflict, the growing humanitarian crisis, the challenges of delivering aid to a suffering population, and prospects for peace talks and an end to the fighting. Daniel Serwer (MEI and SAIS) will moderate.

For More Information and to RSVP

Feb
2
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: How to Get a Job in Peacebuilding
9:30am - 11:30am

Interested in working in the peacebuilding field but not sure how to get your foot in the door? Join us for a networking event that will offer young professionals and graduate students the opportunity to learn more about peacebuilding and conflict resolutions organizations and institutions.

This event offers you the chance to meet staff from a variety peacebuilding organizations and institutions, and it will introduce you to peacebuilders working on everything from sports for peace to countering violent extremism to preventing violence around elections, and everything in between. Learn how peacebuilding intersects with fields like policy making, health, education, governance, and more. This is not a job fair, but instead it is a great opportunity to talk to peacebuilders, learn about new organizations, learn about career paths, and share your own interests and experiences. Join us for a great networking opportunity!

Coffee and pastries will be provided.

Feb
1
PeaceKidZ Info Session
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Would you like to teach Conflict Management skills to local public school children?  Would you like to teach at your convenience for 9 sessions only? We are now recruiting for PeaceKidZ program for spring 2016. The PeaceKidZ program aims to develop children's ability to understand, analyze and manage conflicts in their every day lives. The program is based on the three "Rs": (1) Recognize-understand and analyze conflicts; (2) Respect-attitudes and awareness; and (3) Resolve-skills and strategies. 

Jan
7
Iran's Deepening Ties with China and Russia
12:00pm - 1:30pm

Having pressed to lift sanctions in the P5+1 nuclear deal, Beijing and Moscow are now competing to expand military cooperation and commerce with Tehran. China may rapidly double its oil imports from Iran from their sanctions-era level, while Iran may soon secure full membership in the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, raising its influence in a Eurasian forum where Washington is absent. What is the impact of the Russian-Chinese competition for influence in Iran and how will it shape regional dynamics, as well as the U.S.'s Middle East priorities?

2015
Dec
8
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: The Future of Goal 16: Peace and Inclusion in the Sustainable Development Goals
9:30am - 11:00am

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) make a clear link between conflict and development, thanks to the powerful language about peace in the preamble to the along with the inclusion of Goal 16 on "peaceful and inclusive societies." This emphasis recognizes that protracted conflict undermined the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in many countries, and it creates a new international focus on peacebuilding as one of the solutions to development challenges.

How did the international community shift its thinking toward peace and inclusion in the SDGs, and where do we go from here? The inclusion of peace as a goal in the SDGs was not a foregone conclusion, and panelists will discuss both how advocacy helped ensure a role for peacebuilding in the SDGs and what that means for the next 15 years. They will also discuss the challenge that remains for governments, organizations, and individuals to implement and evaluate these global goals.

Nov
9
Kurdistan Under Pressure
10:00am - 12:00pm

Kurdistan Under Pressure Monday, November 9th 2015 10 am - 12 pm Conference Room 500 Keynote address Bayan Sami Abdul Rahman Kurdistan Regional Government Representative in the United States Panelists Daniel Serwer Senior Fellow, CTR-SAIS Director, SAIS Conflict Management Program Nusseibeh Younis Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council Yael Mizrahi SAIS Middle East and Conflict Management Student Moderator Sasha Toperich Senior Fellow and Director of the Mediterranean Basin Initiative at SAIS 

Oct
29
Albania's Route to the EU: Perceptions and Challenges
4:30pm - 6:30pm

Ilir Meta, Speaker of the Albanian Parliament and Former Prime Minister of Albania will speak on this topic. 

Oct
22
Smart Power of Small States
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Enver Hoxhaj, the former Kosovo Foreign Minister will speak on this topic.

Oct
16
Multi-party Mediation, the Syrian Case
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Compatibility of interests in US-Russia relationship.  Potential for mediated solutions in Syria and Ukraine.

Oct
13
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum
9:30am - 11:00am

With more than half the world's population living in cities for the first time, urban violence has become an increasingly significant problem. From Karachi to San Pedro Sula, urban centers grapple with security threats from within their own populations. In the face of challenges that can include rapid population growth, increased pressure on fragile infrastructure, limited resources such as energy and water, and high levels of  unemployment, city governments are facing substantial challenges maintaining security. This has enabled insurgencies, terrorist organizations, criminal gangs and syndicates to operate more freely. This forum will explore work being to confront urban violence holistically, looking at both urban development programming and youth-centered violence reduction initiatives in cities around the world.

Oct
9
The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform
12:00pm - 1:00pm

Conflict Management Program and the Middle East Institute are pleased to host Tarek Masoud of the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government for a discussion of his book The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (co-authored with Jason Brownlee and Andrew Reynolds). In this highly praised scholarly study, Dr. Masoud and his colleagues examine the societal, political, and economic factors that distinguished the different trajectories of the 2011 popular uprisings against Arab regimes. Why did leaders fall where they did and not elsewhere? Why did mass opposition not coalesce in most societies to broad agreements on forms of participation and governance?

Drawing on extensive research across the region, Dr. Masoud will review his findings about the systems of rule that withstood or broke before popular uprisings and, in countries where leaders were toppled, the factors that most shaped the ensuing developments toward pluralism, renewed authoritarianism, or deeper divisions in society and politics.

William Zartman, Professor Emeritus at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, will moderate the discussion.

Jul
7
Voices from the Middle East: the Israeli & Palestinian Narratives of New Story Leadership
9:00am - 12:00pm

This event brings together young leaders from Israel and Palestine.

May
6
Constructing a Regional Response to Boko Haram: A Negotiation Simulation
3:00pm - 5:00pm

IPSI and the Conflict Management Program present a simulation designed to illustrate the complexity of organizing collaborative regional strategies to address the issue of terrorism and insurgency in neighboring countries. As such, the simulation will focus specifically on issues facing state actors in the region in their attempts to collaborate to prevent the spread of Boko Haram. Those issues include the continued evolution and threat posed by Boko Haram as well as differences among state interests, goals, responses to refugee flows, and resources. No speakers - participants run the simulation.

Apr
10
WIN (Washington Interest in Negotiation) - “Breaking the Mold: A New Set of Multilateral Negotiations for a New Set of Sustainable Development Goals.”
4:30pm - 6:00pm

Lyn Wagner, Senior Manager, Knowledge Management Projects; Pam Chasek, Executive Editor, Earth Negotiations Bulletin, Reporting Services International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), will discuss the topic.

Apr
7
Ambassador Lukman Faily on the Future of Iraq
7:00pm - 8:30pm

Ambassador Lukman Faily, Ambassador of the Republic of Iraq to the United States; Abbas Khadim (Discussant), Senior Foreign Policy Fellow, SAIS; Daniel Serwer (Moderator) Senior Research Professor of Conflict Management, SAIS, and MEI Non-resident Scholar, will discuss about Iraq and its future.

Apr
1
Colombia: Unsdertanding Conflict - Conflict Management Program Student Field Trip to Colombia
8:30pm - 10:00pm


Prof. Zartman, Prof. Hopmann and four current SAIS conflict management students will discuss the topic.

Mar
30
WIN (Washington Interest in Negotiation) Meeting: symmetry and asymmetry of power in negotiations between multinationals and States: the case of Areva and the government of Niger
4:30pm - 6:00pm

Doudou Sidibe, SAIS Visiting Scholar, Novancia Business School in Paris, will discuss the topic. Note: This event is off the record.

Feb
19
Local Ceasefires and Reconciliation in Syria
5:00pm - 7:00pm

The Syria Justice and Accountability Centre (SJAC) and the Conflict Management Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) invite you to attend the launch of a new report detailing Syrian perspectives on locally-based conflict resolution initiatives. "Maybe We Can Reach a Solution:" Syrian Perspectives on the Conflict and Local Initiatives for Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation marks the second phase of a comprehensive research initiative launched by SJAC to investigate the opinions of a diverse group of Syrians on the transitional justice process.

Feb
17
CANCELED: West Beirut: A Story from the Lebanese Civil War
11:15pm - 1:00am

In April 1975, civil war breaks out; Beirut is partitioned along a Muslim-Christian line and is divided into East and West Beirut. The war moves inexorably from adventure to a nation wide tragedy. This event is off-the-record. 

Feb
10
Blueprint for Revolution
3:00pm - 4:30pm

Blueprint for Revolution is not only a spirited guide to changing the world but a breakthrough in the annals of advice for those who seek justice and democracy. It asks (and not heavy-handedly): As long as you want to change the world, why not do it joyfully? It's not just funny. It's seriously funny. No joke." - Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and Occupy Nation

Feb
6
WIN (Washington Interest in Negotiation) Meeting: Closure - How Negotiations End
6:30pm - 8:00pm

I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus, Conflict Management will discuss this topic. This event is off-the-record.

Feb
4
Kosovo: From importer of Security to a stabilizing factor of South East Europe
4:00pm - 5:30pm

H.E. Hashim Thaçi, deputy prime minister of foreign affairs and Daniel Serwer, professor, Conflict Management and senior fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations will discuss this topic.  

Feb
3
Macedonia: Can It Join Europe?
9:00pm - 10:30pm

Fatmir Besimi, deputy prime minister of Macedonia for European Affairs will discuss this topic.

Jan
29
PeaceKidZ Infromation Session
6:30pm - 7:30pm

This is an information session for anyone interested in taking the PeaceKidZ class and teaching conflict resolution skills in DC public schools. 

2014
Nov
21
What Have We Learned from Tunisia's Democratic Transition? Ongoing Elections, Coming Challenges, and the Regional Applicability of the Tunisian Model
6:00pm - 7:30pm

Note: This event has been cancelled. Larbi Sadiki, professor of international affairs at Qatar University, and I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Distinguished Professor Emeritus of International Organization and Conflict Resolution, will discuss this topic.

Nov
20
Good Governance: Can A Successful Democracy Be Built in Mali?
3:00pm - 5:30pm

Aaron Sampson, Africa director for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor at the US Department of State, will address participants on the curent situtaion in Mali and participants will take part in a simulation to construct a peace plan for Mali in a hypothetical post-peace-agreement situation.

Oct
30
Conflict Management Program Field Trip Briefing: Colombia Peace Process
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Marc Chernick, director of the Center for Latin American Studies and associate professor of political science in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is off the record.

Oct
30
WIN (Washington Interest in Negotiation) Meeting: Democratizing Negotiation
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Bertram Spector, editor-in-chief of International Negotiation, executive director of the Center for Negotiation Analysis, and senior technical director at Management Systems International, will discuss this topic.

Oct
14
Conflict Prevention and Resolution: Ebola, Health Security, Conflict and Peacebuilding
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Richard Garfield, emergency response and recovery team lead for assessment, surveillance, and information management at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Deborah Rosenblum, executive vice pesident of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, will discuss this topic. Note: This event will have a live webcast.

Sep
24
Washington Interest in Negotiation Meeting: Lessons for Negotiation from the Infitadat
5:30pm - 7:00pm

The Conflict Management Program will host a seminar for local academics and experts in the field of negotiation to discuss one another’s work and papers. I. William Zartman, professor emeritus and Blaustein Chair of International Organization and Conflict Resolution, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is off the record.

Sep
16
Conflict Prevention and Resolution: Is the World Falling Apart?
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Sarah Chayes, senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program and the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; Marc Gopin, director of the Center on Religion, Diplomacy, and Conflict Resolution at George Mason University’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution; and George Lopez, vice president of the Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding at the United States Institute of Peace, will discuss this topic. P. Terrence Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program, will provide opening remarks. Note: This event will have a live webcast.

Sep
8
Conflict Management Program Field Trip Meeting: Colombia
9:30pm - 11:00pm

P. Terrence Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program, will discuss the Conflict Management Program's upcoming research trip to Columbia for interested students. 

Sep
3
PeaceKidZ Information Session
6:30pm - 7:00pm

I. William Zartman, professor emeritus of international organization and conflict resolution, and Isabelle Talpain-Long, program coordinator for the Conflict Management Program, will discuss the PeaceKidZ program for interested students.

Sep
3
Conflict Management Program Meeting
5:00pm - 6:30pm

P. Terrence Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program, will discuss courses, requirements, field trip, and capstone requirements. 

Aug
22
The Andi Leadership Institute for Young Women (ALI) Closing Ceremony
8:00pm - 10:00pm

Jaime Horn, director of the Andi Leadership Institute, and Kim Massey, program director at the Andi Leadership Institute, will speak during the closing ceremony for the eight participants taking part in this year's program. 

Aug
12
South China Seas Crisis Negotiation Simulation
10:30pm - 12:30am

The International Peace and Security Institute will host an interactive simulation exploring this topic. 

Jul
24
Confronting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria: Challenges and Options
5:00pm - 7:00pm

Richard Clarke, chairman of the board of governors of the The Middle East Institute; Steve Simon, senior fellow at The Middle East Institute; Randa Slim, director of the Track II Dialogues Initiative; and Daniel Serwer, a senior research professor in the Conflict Management Program, will discuss this topic. 

Jul
10
Perspectives from the Middle East: Israeli and Palestinian Voices from New Story Leadership
2:00pm - 5:00pm

Ten students, five from Israel and five from Palestine, will share their stories and projects on this topic. 

Jul
8
Countering Violent Extremism: A Peacebuilding Lens
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Georgia Holmer, senior program officer in the Center for Gender and Peacebuilding at the U.S. Institute of Peace; Mike Jobbins, senior program manager for africa at Search for Common Ground; Irfan Saeed, senior policy advisor in the Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Haroon Ullah, member of the U.S. Secretary of State's Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State, will discuss this topic. Note: There will be a live webcast of this event.

May
13
Implications of the Iraq Elections
3:00pm - 4:30pm

Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations; Abbas Kadhim, senior foreign policy fellow at SAIS; Denise Natali, senior research fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies; Harith al Qarawee, consultant at Misbar Research Center-Dubai; Daniel Serwer, senior research professor in the Conflict Management Program and senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at SAIS, will discuss this topic.

May
13
Where Have All The Leaders Gone? The Role of Leadership in Preventing and Healing Violent Conflict
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Susan Collin Marks, senior vice president at Search for Common Ground, and Jerry White, deputy assistant secretary of state for the Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations at the U.S. Departmentt of State, will discuss this topic.

May
1
Mutual Understanding: A Look at Russia and Ukraine
10:30pm - 12:30am

P. Terrence Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program; Matthew Rojansky, director of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center; and Karina Korostelina, associate professor and director of the Program on History Memory and Conflict at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, will discuss this topic. A role-play simulation will follow with participants taking on the roles of Russia, the U.S., Ukraine and the E.U. Note: Spots are limited, please RSVP.

Apr
4
Mindanao: Understanding Conflict
5:15pm - 7:00pm

Students from the SAIS Conflict Management Program will present their report on the Mindanao conflict from their January student research trip to the Philippines.

Mar
11
Evaluating People-To-People Reconciliation Programs: Findings, Conclusions and Feedback
2:00pm - 8:00pm

Susan Allen, director of George Mason University’s Center for Peacemaking Practice; Melissa Brown, director of the Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation in USAID’s Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance; David Hunsicker, Asia and Middle East Team Leader in USAID's Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation; Kelly Skeith, deputy director for Performance Evaluation at Social Impact; Mathias Kjaer, evaluation specialist at Social Impact; Liz McClintock, founder and managing partner at CMPartners; and Melanie Cohen Greenberg, president and CEO of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will host a live webcast of this event.

Feb
20
Mentoring and Networking
10:30pm - 2:30am

I. William Zartman, professor emeritus of international organizations and conflict resolution in the Conflict Management Program; P.T. Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program; and Conflict Management Program alumni, will discuss this topic. Note: A reception will follow this event.

Feb
11
The Next Step After the Millennium Development Goals: Sustaining Peace and Development Through the Post-2015 Agenda
3:30pm - 5:00pm

Molly Elgin-Cossart, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress; Ravi Karkara, global expert adviser on children and youth for U.N. Habitat  and the U.N. Millennium Campaign; Karen Mulhauser, president of Mulhauser and Associates and chair of the United Nations Association of the U.S., and Charles Call, senior adviser for the Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations at the U.S. Department of State, will discuss this topic.

Feb
7
Kosovo and Serbia: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?
4:00pm - 5:00pm

Enver Hoxhaj, foreign minister of Kosovo, and Slobodan Petrovic, deputy prime minister of Kosovo, will discuss this topic.   

Jan
30
PeaceKidZ Information Session
7:00pm - 8:00pm

I. William Zartman, professor of International Organization and Conflict resolution at SAIS, will discuss opportunities with the PeaceKidZ program with interested students.

2013
Dec
17
Amnesty in the Colombian Conflict: A Simulated Negotiation
11:30pm - 1:30am

Dana Brown, executive director of the U.S. Office on Colombia, will discuss this topic. Note: No prior negotiating experience or knowledge of the conflict is necessary to participate.

Dec
3
Shifting U.S. Foreign Policy from a ‘Victory Orientation’ to a ‘Solution Orientation’?
3:30pm - 5:00pm

Johan Galtung, professor of peace studies and founder of Transcend International, will discuss this topic. Note: A reception will follow this event.

Nov
21
Continued Crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Conversation With U.S. Special Envoy Russ Feingold
3:30pm - 5:00pm

Russ Feingold, the U.S. special envoy to Africa’s Great Lakes region, will be the featured speaker at this event. Note: This event is off the record.

Nov
20
The Challenges of Democratic Transition in Tunisia
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Wassim Daghrir, an associate professor at the University of Sousse, Tunisia’s English Department and a Fulbright Scholar at Villanova University, will discuss this topic.

Nov
18
Conflict Management Career Panel
6:30pm - 8:00pm

P. Terrence Hopmann, director of the SAIS Conflict Management Program; Eric Henry, professorial lecturer in the SAIS Conflict Management Program and founder and managing partner of CM Partners; Lynn Wagner, professorial lecturer in the SAIS Conflict Management Program and senior manager for knowledge management projects at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD); and Daniel Serwer, senior research professor in the SAIS Conflict Management Program and senior fellow at the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations, will discuss this topic.

Oct
18
Syria’s Moderate Opposition: Challenges to Ending the Conflict
4:00pm - 5:30pm

Najab Ghadbian, special representative to the United States for the National Coalition of Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces, will discuss this topic.

Oct
8
The Relationship Between International Development and Building Sustainable Peace
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Donald Steinberg, president and CEO of World Learning, and Sandra Melone, executive vice president of Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic.

Sep
10
Integrated Peacebuilding: Innovative Approaches to Transforming Conflict
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Craig Zelizer, associate director of the M.A. in Conflict Resolution Program at Georgetown University; Mike Jobbins, senior program manager for Africa at Search for Common Ground; and Tobie Whitman, an independent consultant, will discuss this topic.

Sep
9
Conflict Management Program Field Trip: Mindanao Information Session
5:30pm - 7:00pm

The Conflict Management Program will host an information session for a field trip to Mindanao.

Sep
5
Conflict Management Program Meeting
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Professor Hopmann, director of the Conflict Management Program, will discuss the Program. All incoming and returning Conflict Management students should plan to attend.

Sep
4
Peacekidz Information Session
5:30pm - 7:00pm

I. William Zartman, professor emeritus in the Conflict Management Program, and Peacekidz alumni, will discuss this program bringing SAIS students to local public schools to teach conflict management skills.

Aug
28
Salon 101: Exploring Opposing Perspectives in Egypt
7:00pm - 10:00pm

Mohamed Elmenshawy, director of the Language and Regional Studies Program at the Middle East Institute; Nancy Okail, director of Freedom House's Egypt office in Cairo; and I. William Zartman, professor emeritus, will discuss this topic.

Aug
23
Andi Leadership Institute for Young Women Capstone Presentations
8:00pm - 10:00pm

The eight participants of the inaugural Andi Leadership Institute for Young Women (ALI) will present their capstone projects. ALI seeks to equip the next generation of female peacebuilders, both international and American, to be leaders in their communities. For more information and to RSVP, contact jaime@andileadership.org.

Jul
10
New Story Leadership: Stories Changing the Future for the Middle East
2:30pm - 5:00pm

Aseel Saied, a recipient of the Hope Fund Scholarship at Bridgewater College from Ramallah, Palestine; Gal Raij, a public activist for the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya and Hadera, Israel; Coral Kasirer, a graduate from the University of British Columbia from Zichron Ya'akov, Israel, will discuss their experiences.

Jul
9
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: "Opting Out of War:Strategies to Prevent Violent Conflict"
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Marshall Wallace, director of the Do No Harm Program at the Collaboration for Development Action; Kristin Doughty, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Rochester; Sue Williams, an expert in peace and development; and Sandra Melone, executive vice president at the Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will host a live Webcast available here at the time of the event.

Jun
11
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum : Visualizing Peace: Graphic Art and Social Change
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Andrew Aydin, co-author of March (Book One); Nate Powell: illustrator of March and creator of the acclaimed graphic novel Any Empire; Dalia Ziada (via Skype), activist, blogger and award-winning women’s rights advocate and translator of The Montgomery Story; and Jeanné Isler (moderator), director of USA Programs at Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will host a live Webcast available here at the time of the event.

May
14
Conflict Assessment: Comparing Research Methods and Conceptual Frameworks
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Dayna Brown, director of the Listening Project at CDA Collaborative Learning; Neil Levine, director of the Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation in USAID’s Office of Democracy and Governance; Bruce Hemmer, a research analyst at the Office of Learning and Training of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau for Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO); Paul Turner, a CSO policy analyst; and Lisa Schirch founding director of the Alliance for Peacebuilding’s 3P Human Security program, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will host a live Webcast for this event.

May
1
Should We Forget the Past? Overcoming Historical Grievances During Transition
10:30pm - 12:00am

Leslie Dwyer, assistant professor of conflict analysis and anthropology at George Mason University’s School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution; Margaret Smith, scholar-in-residence at American University’s School of International Service; William Stuebner, former special adviser to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; and Joseph Montville (moderator), board chair and senior fellow at the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will also host a live webcast available here at the time of the event. 

Apr
23
Building Bridges: Citizen-Security Sector Engagement to Mitigate Conflict
2:30pm - 5:15pm

Experts and policymakers will discuss the experiences of U.S. government programs and civil society organizations working directly with governments and security forces to improve citizen security. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://salsa.sfcg.org/p/salsa/event/common/public/?event_KEY=319638.

Apr
10
Unlocking the Peace Puzzle in Obama’s Second Term
2:00pm - 3:30pm

Daniel Kurzter, lecturer and S. Daniel Abraham Professor in Middle Eastern Policy Studies at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Shibley Telhami, professor of international relations and Anwar Sadat Professor of Peace and Development at University of Maryland; Geoff Aronson, director of research and publications the Foundation for Middle East Peace; and Daniel Serwer (moderator), senior research professor in the SAIS Conflict Management Program, will discuss this topic. 

Apr
2
Nagorno-Karabakh: Understanding Conflict
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Students from the January 2013 SAIS trip to the Caucasus region will discuss their findings and present reports based on their interviews with leaders and members of international organizations in the region about the roots of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. 

Apr
2
United Nations Guidance for Effective Mediation"
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Levent Bilman, director of the Policy and Mediation Division in the Department of Political Affairs at the United Nations (U.N.); Francis Deng , former under-secretary-general and special adviser to the U.N. secretary-general on the prevention of genocide; Charles  Call, senior adviser at the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations; Peter Wallensteen, Richard G. Starmann Sr. Research Professor of Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies; I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus; and Terrence Hopmann (moderator), director of the SAIS Conflict Management Program, will discuss this topic. Note: Lunch will be provided immediately following the event. SAIS will also host a live webcast available here at the time of the event. 

Mar
20
The Struggle for Democracy in Tunisia
7:30pm - 10:00pm

Experts, policymakers and Tunisian scholars will discuss key political and economic challenges, the struggle over the constitution, and how U.S. officials and nongovernmental organizations help Tunisians address mounting domestic and regional crisises. Note: SAIS will also host a live webcast of the event available here at the time of the event. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://www.usip.org/events/the-struggle-democracy-in-tunisia

Mar
13
Making Sense of Local Governance in Syria
9:00pm - 11:00pm

Nate Rosenblatt, analyst at Caerus Associates and a SAIS graduate; I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus; and Daniel Serwer, senior research professor in the Conflict Management Program, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is open to invited guests and SAIS students only, and the speakers’ comments will be off the record.

Feb
12
Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: “Gender, Masculinity and Conflict Dynamics: Review of Current Practice
3:30pm - 5:00pm

Steven Steiner, gender adviser at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and former senior adviser in the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the U.S. Department of State; Maria Correia, social development sector manager of the South Asia Region at the World Bank; Joseph Vess, senior program officer at Promundo; and Kathleen Kuehnast, director of USIP’s Center for Gender and Peacebuilding, will discuss this topic. 

Jan
31
PeaceKidz Information Session
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Join I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus, to learn about the PeaceKidz program and available opportunities for students. The PeaceKidZ program aims to develop children's ability to understand, analyze and manage conflicts in their every day lives. Note: This event is open to SAIS students only.

2012
Dec
11
Prescriptions for Peaceful Transitions: Is Democracy Mandatory?
10:00pm - 11:30pm

Carl Gershman, president of the National Endowment for Democracy; Cynthia Irmer, special assistant in the Office of the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Humans Rights at the U.S. Department of State; Marina Ottaway, senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; and I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus, will discuss this topic.

Dec
4
Negotiating the Arab Spring: Policy Options
10:30pm - 12:30am

Fen Osler Hampson, distinguished fellow and director of the Global Security Centre for International Governance Innovation; Ellen Laipson, president of the Stimson Center; I. William Zartman, professor emeritus at SAIS; and Instituut Clingendael research fellows Regina Joseph and Floor Janssen will discuss this topic.

Nov
20
TALIM Board Meeting
1:00pm - 5:00pm

Nov
13
"Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum: Comedy & Conflict"
3:30pm - 5:00pm

Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University; Elahe Izadi, comedian and National Journal reporter; Craig Zelizer, associate director of the Conflict Resolution Program at Georgetown University; and S. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana (moderator), visiting assistant professor in the Conflict Resolution Program at Georgetown University, will discuss this topic.

Nov
5
Informational Interview Reports
1:30pm - 3:00pm

As we continue to analyze the Conflict Management job market, we’re narrowing our employment search and identifying our preferred employers and the skills they want to see on a resume. Come prepared to present the results of your informational interviews and help us plan a series of skills building course.

Oct
30
From Conflict Analysis to Peacebuilding Impact: Lessons from the People’s Peacebuilding Perspectives Project
10:30am - 12:00pm

Rigorous conflict analysis is essential for all actors operating in settings of violence and social conflict. Many different assessment frameworks are in use by various international non-governmental and governmental institutions working in development, peacebuilding, and governance sectors, including US agencies. But analysis tools and the manner in which assessments are conducted vary widely, with mixed results.
 
Saferworld and Conciliation Resources are leading NGOs working internationally on programs and policies relating to conflict prevention and peacebuilding. The People’s Peacemaking Perspectives (PPP) project was a joint initiative implemented in close collaboration with a number of local actors and organizations on the ground. Panelists will present the conclusions of the PPP project and implications for US agencies and other institutions working in conflict settings using case studies in Kenya and other contexts. They will illustrate the benefits, success criteria and challenges to taking a participatory approach to conflict analysis.

Oct
29
From Breakers to Makers
7:15pm - 9:00pm

Moving from a totalitarian to a democratic state is exhausting and filled with uncertainty. By looking back at Tunisia before its revolution, many Tunisians acquired destructive attitudes towards the government as a way to express their resentment to the dictatorship.
The dictator is gone and a democratic political system is now needed to take place... That's the challenge Tunisia is currently facing, according to Basssem Bouguerra. Tunisia now needs to change the "breaking" attitude into a "making" one. Tunisians need to stop destructing and start building and they need to be democratic, even though we never learned how to be one, according to Bouguerra.
Bassem Bouguerra is a Human Rights activist, blogger, founder and executive director of the NGO (non-governmental organization): "Tunisian Institutional Reform". The NGO's goal is that of reforming the police in Tunisia.
Bouguerra recently moved back to Tunisia after spending 12 years in the United States where he received a Bachelor Degree in Computer Science from Long Beach State University, worked as a Software Architect at Yahoo for 5 years and a researcher at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab.  He was featured in a June 3rd, 2011 New York Times article, entitled, "The Longer Arc of a Revolutionary's Life".
 

Oct
25
The Arab Spring:The Tunisian Experiment
7:30pm - 9:00pm

Tarek Kahlaoui was a leading figure in the student movement in Tunisia in the 1990’s, prior to completing his Phd at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Since 2008, has has served as an assistant professor of Islamic Art at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.
Professor Kahlaoui was active in the anti-censorship movement before the fall of the Ben Ali regime. In the summer of 2011, Professor Kahlaoui founded the « Dean Muhammad Chakroun Center for Research and Studies » in Tunisia, a think tank associated with CPR, the Tunisian political party with the Moncef Marzouki, president of the Tunisia Republic.
Professor Kahlaoui currently serves as General Director of the Tunisian Institute of Strategic Studies, a presidential institution serving as an advisory board to the President and the government. He is also a member of the political bureau of the CPR, one of the three parties of the governing coalition in Tunisia.
 

Oct
23
The Political and Economic Implications of hte Palestinian Authority's Fiscal Crisis
4:30pm - 6:00pm

discussion about the fiscal crisis facing the Palestine Authority and the political implications of the PA's deteriorating economic situation. In mid-September, the IMF and the World Bank issued a report saying that the Palestinian financial crisis will worsen unless foreign funding increases and Israel eases restrictions on economic activity. Neither solution looks imminent and protests in response to the economic hardships have turned into an indictment of President Mahmoud Abbas's policies, raising questions about the future of the PA's leadership. Danin, Elgindy, and Kanaan will examine the economic and political fallout stemming from the latest crisis and explore the role of the international community in finding a way out.

Oct
22
The Tunisian Revolution and the US Role in Tunisia’s Transition to Democracy
7:30pm - 9:00pm

Ambassador Gordon Gray is a veteran diplomat, representing the United States in many parts of the Middle East and North Africa. His most recent post was that of the United States Ambassador to Tunisia, having arrived there after having served in Iraq. His Ambassadorship in Tunisia included a major turning point in Tunisia’s history…the January 2011 Revolution.
Ambassador Gray will provide insight into the U.S. role at this historical moment and how the U.S. has been working with Tunisia through its transition to democracy.
 

Oct
11
Mapping-out Conflict Management Employment Strategies
5:00pm - 6:30pm

Join the Global Security and Conflict Management (GSCM) Career Club's inaugural meeting as we outline this year's strategy to a promising career in the field of conflict management.

Oct
9
CPRF: The Global Power of Talk: Lessons of Diplomacy and Negotiation
10:30am - 12:00pm

The Forum will draw from the new book by I William Zartman and Fen Osler Hampson, which lays out the different ways Talk can be used to accomplish foreign policy purposes that military might can never reach.  It identifies 14 forms of negotiation and then applies them to current situations where diplomacy is needed. The discussants will help develop the theme and reflect on lessons learned in the field of diplomacy and negotiation.  In the current juncture of events, the global power of talk is more needed to be deployed than ever before.

Sep
27
"Tunisia's Economic Prospects."
7:00pm - 9:00pm

Over the past century, Tunisia has been a leader among Arab countries on countless fronts: the modernization of its economy, industrial development, education, human rights, and more. In January of 2011, they led once again with a political uprising, in the name of democracy, freedom and dignity that would spread like wildfire across Northern Africa and throughout the Middle East and would later to be known as the Arab Spring.
This report provides a broad overview of the country and its institutions before and after the uprising that resulted in the ousting of former President Ben Ali. The author offers a clear analysis of the current political situation and the priorities of those in power. Conflicting secular and religious visions for the country’s future are prolonging efforts to draft a new constitution and drawing attention and resources away from other potentially more destabilizing problems caused by a recession and the lingering effects of a global economic crisis.
Each sector of the economy is covered, from agriculture to industry to tourism, will be included in this presentation, as well as a Tunisia’s geopolitical situation in relation to neighboring countries.
Financial indicators in all these areas and the lack of consensus among stakeholders reveal the difficulties that lie ahead.
The obstacles facing Tunisia are numerous and must be met by strong leadership and bold action. This presentation closes with a roadmap of urgent priorities needed to reverse the current downward trend of Tunisia’s economy. Structural reforms, the fight against corruption, free market policies, foreign investment, more transparency and accountability, and better governance among others are offered as solutions to restore the country to its past glory and its rightful place as a regional leader.
 

Our Alumni

 

Fall 2015 Conflict Management Program Newsletter


Dear CM Alumni,

We are pleased to share with you the first issue of the Conflict Management Program Bulletin.  We intend on sending our newsletter a couple of times a year to keep in touch with our alumni across the globe. If you would like to contribute, whether you wrote a book, published an article, spoke at a conference, or wish to be profiled, let us know. We also welcome suggestions for new features in our newsletter. 

I hope you enjoy it.

The Conflict Management Program 


Research

2015
Colombia: Understanding Conflict 2015
2014
Mindanao: Understanding Conflict 2014
2013
Nagorno Karabakh: Understanding Conflict 2013
2012
Tunisia: Understanding Conflict 2012
2011
Mindanao: Understanding Conflict 2011
2010
Kosovo: Understanding Conflict 2010
2009
Cyprus: Understanding Conflict 2009
2008
Northern Ireland: Understanding Conflict 2008
2007
Haiti: Understanding Conflict 2007
2006
Haiti: Understanding Conflict 2006

External Resources

 

Conflict Management Toolkit

International Conflict Management is a dynamic, interdisciplinary field, constantly evolving as a response to problems in International Relations. Theoretically located between social and behavioral science, it is the point at which these perspectives meet and sometimes clash. Conflict management can be functionally understood by what it seeks to accomplish.

Conflict Management aims to:

  • Prevent the eruption of destructive conflict.
  • Facilitate a move from violent to spoken conflict.
  • Enable a transformation from conflict to lasting peace by addressing root causes and effects of conflict.


The Conflict Management Toolkit identifies five devices or strategies of conflict management:

At different phases of a conflict the multiple strategies of conflict management respond to barriers in the process in different ways: Conflict Prevention is an approach that seeks to resolve disputes before violence breaks out; Peacemaking transforms the conflict from violent to spoken, and further, toward the definition of a common peaceful solution; Peacekeeping missions are often required to halt violence and preserve peace once it is obtained. If successful, those missions can strengthen the opportunity for post-conflict Peacebuilding, which should function to prevent the recurrence of violence by addressing the root causes of conflict and creating a stable and durable peace. Finally, Statebuilding is the process of reconstructing weak or collapsed infrastructure and institutions of a society - political, economic and civil - in order for civil society and politics to begin to function normally.

It may be difficult or even undesirable to come up with exact definitions of these concepts. Trying to define the tasks that go into each "strategy" would risk limiting rather than expanding the means by which conflicts can be managed. It is therefore useful to look at these concepts in terms of the goals and aims of those strategies, the targets of particular actions, and in terms of the specific problems that need to be addressed. Each strategy addresses specific problems that occur during the Conflict Process:

  • Conflict Prevention: Politicization, militarization, escalation.
  • Peacemaking: Perceived incompatibility of interests.
  • Peacekeeping: Violent behavior/military activity.
  • Peacebuilding: Negative attitudes/socio-economic structure.
  • Statebuilding: Collapsed States and weak or non-existing civil and political institutions.
     

In an effort to merge theory and practice, the Conflict Management Toolkit approaches conflict and conflict management from three perspectives: Approaches, Issues in Practice, and Resources.

Approaches

The aim of the theoretical analysis of conflict is to develop an understanding of the variables, processes, strategies, and techniques that interact to form the basis for Conflict Management. These enable us to analyze, understand, explain and predict conflict and the mechanisms that contribute to its solution. We organize conflict management into five overlapping and interrelated areas: Conflict Prevention, Peacekeeping, Peacemaking, Post-conflict Peacebuilding, and Statebuilding. Rather than providing a package of tools and strategies that have to be stretched in order to apply to a variety of conflict situations, the approaches presented here attempt to identify the challenges that Conflict Management faces in practice and ways to deal with them. Instead of playing one strategy off against another, the toolkit looks at how these approaches can interact through a focus on problems, target groups, actors, and tasks involved.

Issues In Practice

The Challenge for Conflict Management Theory is to study real problems in the real world rather than just ideal cases. In the Issues in Practice section a number of topics that confront theoreticians and practitioners on all levels of activity are introduced and analyzed in view of the theoretical approaches. Most of these issues are answers to problems that span across the entire field of Conflict Management, or crosscutting agendas that have to be dealt with in order for the theoretical approaches to truly tackle the reality of conflicts. It involves evaluating the effectiveness of Conflict management as well as its readiness to deal with new problems and new issues, such as terrorism.

Resources

The resources section provides a guide to different organizations and practitioners working in the field of Conflict Management in its link section and it offers information about similar conflict management initiatives. The practitioners are usually mediators, negotiators, diplomats, facilitators, relief workers, or even the conflicting parties themselves. The tasks range from negotiating cease-fires to providing social and psychological healing to those who have been most affected by the violence. The "organizations" involved these activities can be sovereign states, agencies, international organizations, diplomats or other actors that support, organize and fund those working in the field. They provide training, legitimization, knowledge, resources, early warning and experience. This section also includes syllabi from several different conflict management courses, both at Johns Hopkins SAIS and elsewhere, and links to a multitude of journals focusing on conflict management-related issues. It also offers a list of useful links to the websites of NGOs, government agencies, donor organizations, media outlets, and research institutions that work in conflicts worldwide. A glossary and historiography explain common conflict management terms and their theoretical evolution. The section offers a look into "Peacekidz," a Johns Hopkins SAIS project to adapt international conflict management to everyday life - a team of students research and design a conflict resolution program for middle school children and teaches it weekly at Francis C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia.

As new concepts emerge and agendas expand, we need ways with which to classify and understand new information. The Conflict Management Toolkit attempts to arrange the concepts and terms of Conflict Management into meaningful theoretical and practical categories. These categories then become more comprehensible and useful for students, practitioners and academics. We hope that this highlights both the importance, as well as the interdependence of both theory and practice to conflict management. In the words of the Swedish negotiator to the Kyoto Protocol, Bo Kjellen: "I only knew negotiations through my practical experience and started to read the theory only towards the end of my career. I think it would have helped me a lot had I known the theory earlier." (World Bank Seminar on International Waters, 27 February 2002).

CMToolkit is the work of the Conflict Management Program of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and is made available to the Alliance for Peacebuilding (AfP) and its members as part of the Program’s participation in AfP. All materials in the Toolkit may be used with appropriates attribution.

Reactions and suggestions (and appreciations) are welcome. All correspondence should be addressed to CMToolkit@jhu.edu.

Contact Us


Daniel Serwer
Professor and Director of the Conflict Management Program
daniel@serwer.org
Rome 416

Isabelle Talpain-Long
Program Coordinator
ConflictManagement@jhu.edu
Rome 420

Address & Phone

Conflict Management
Rome Building
1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC
20036


202-663-5745

202-663-5619