African Studies

Changing Africa...
Engaging with the Region
Diversity and Range

Africa is on the move, with accelerating economic growth, more stable governance and widening security.
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Enduring challenges - of economic transformation, governance and contentious politics - provide the focus for teaching, research and engagement.
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Through wide-ranging course offerings and activities, the program addresses issues across countries, sectors and societies.
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Overview
Faculty
Program Activities
Curriculum
Minor
Events Calendar
Our Alumni
Research
External Resources
Contact

The African Studies Program offers an extensive curriculum covering development, governance and security across the continent. We draw on leading theories of international politics, political economy and comparative analysis in approaching this dynamic region. The program offers excellent foundations in the history and politics of the region, with a consistent focus on current policy concerns and emerging issues in Africa. Courses address general themes as well as particular countries, regions and specialized topics.

With an incomparable location in Washington DC, our students engage with a global array of leading academics, policymakers, activists and development practitioners. Through opportunities for independent research, internships and study visits, students regularly travel to the region. Graduates pursue successful careers in the private sector, international development institutions, non-governmental organizations, government and the policy world. Please join us at our community page, Connect SAIS Africa, for updates,comentary, and news on students and alumni.

African Studies student and Yayi Bayam, president of a small non-profit that provides skills training for young women in a religiously "conservative" community just outside of Dakar.
SAIS International Development-African Studies intersession trip to South Africa.
Nigerian elections: distribution of voting materials, photo: Jenny Bussey Vaughan
Student trip to China examining China-Africa relations, photo: Joseph Ho
Afrobarometer presentation: "Lived Poverty Declines in Africa: Is it Better Growth or Better Roads?" February 2016
Conference: "Re-framing South Africa: Thinking About Transformation"
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Faculty

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Program Activities

 

Program Highlights

Students in the African Studies Program have many opportunities for travel, research and engagement with contemporary issues on the continent.

Our seminar series brings dozens of speakers to campus each year, focusing on a wide range of academic and policy topics. Recent seminars have covered the political foundations of ethnic violence, the challenges of institutional reform in Africa, politics in Nigeria, Senegal, Kenya, and South Africa, conflict in Mali and the Democratic Republic of Congo, the role of social media and democracy, and China-Africa relations. The program's annual conferences cover a range of themes from development, to democratization, to the role of religion in politics.

Most students benefit from assistance for travel to Africa, including internships, independent research and structured study trips. Research opportunities include extended programs in Ghana, Senegal and Tunisia, as well as self-designed initiatives in other countries.

 

Internship Opportunities

African Studies students regularly receive internships in the United States and Africa. These encompass a range of organizations in government, nongovernmental institutions and the private sector. Students have had recent access to internships in Benin, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Niger Republic, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

 

Travel Opportunities

On an occasional basis, the program offers study trips to students during intersession and summer periods. Recent trips have included South Africa, Ethiopia, Ghana, Senegal and China.

An independent study field program to Senegal, Ghana or Tunisia is an option between the first and second year. Students should develop a project proposal in the fall semester to be submitted by March of the spring semester. Proficiency in Arabic or French is required for Tunisia, proficiency in French for Senegal.
In the past few years, other study trips and research projects have included:

  • “African Migrants to Europe: The West African Coastal Link” (Senegal) 
  • “Authoritarian Development in Ethiopia and Rwanda”
  • “Beyond Local Content: Catalyzing Economic Development through Ghana’s Oil Sector”
  • “China’s Engagement in Africa: the Case of Cameroon”
  • ”Constitutional Development in a New State” (South Sudan) 
  • “Democracy and Traditional Rule in Ghana” 
  • “Developing Transport Linkages in SADC: Malawi and Zambia” 
  • “Displaced Persons and Land-Related Violence in Kenya”
  • “Education in Conflict-Stricken Areas: Challenges and Achievements of Education in Rwanda”
  • “The Evolving Character of Ghanaian Democracy” 
  • “IDPs and Conflict in Northern Nigeria”
  • “Managing Resource Wealth in a New Oil Producer” (Ghana)
  • “Media Programs and Governance: the Case of Sierra Leone” 
  • “Political Survival and Regime Change in Africa”
  • “Protest and Democratic Succession in Senegal”
  • “Regional Variation in Southern African States” 
  • “The Role of Kenya’s Civil Society in the Constitution Review Process”
  • “A Strategic Approach to Women’s Right in Senegal: Engaging Local Partners in Legal Reform”
  • “Success and Shortcomings of Kenya’s Counterterrorism Efforts”
  • “Understanding Accountability Across Post-Conflict Societies: The Cases of Nepal and Liberia”
  • “Violence and Resources in the Niger Delta of Nigeria” 
  • “Youth Movements and Political Crisis in Cote’ d’Ivoire”
  • “Youth Unemployment in South Africa: The plight of South Africa’s marginalized and under-skilled youth”
 

Events and Conferences

The African Studies Program sponsors a weekly seminar series and annual conferences covering a wide range of topics on Africa.

Curriculum

 

AFRICAN STUDIES | MA Requirements

African Studies Program

Program Overview and Key Themes


Entering Class 2015-2016

Students take the equivalent of 16 non-language courses (64 credits) in order to graduate. Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 courses (48 credits) or 14 courses (56 credits) as approved by Academic Affairs.

 

AFRICAN STUDIES

Students concentrating in African Studies take at least 6 courses within this program, which may include one course outside African Studies on an African topic. Courses in the curriculum cross-listed with African Studies may be counted toward the concentration requirement. African Studies MA students must take a minimum of one of the following courses below and are highly encouraged to take two additional courses with the prefix of SA.780.XXX:

  • SA.780.648 Political Economy of African Development
  • SA.780.724 Contemporary African Politics
  • SA.780.727 Politics of Foreign Aid in Africa
 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Students complete four courses within this program.
·         Microeconomics
·         Macroeconomics (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         International Trade Theory (prerequisite Microeconomics)
·         International Monetary Theory (prerequisite Macroeconomics)
 
Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and/or Macro in Pre-Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses. Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements. Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets.

Students must receive a 2.67 average in the 4 required economics courses or they must retake a course(s) until a 2.67 average is obtained. If any of the 4 courses are achieved by passing a waiver exam or during Pre-Term, the student must substitute an economics elective course(s) in place of the waived course(s) in order to fulfill the economics requirement above. In this case, the school will use the highest economics program elective course grade(s) to compute this average if a student is replacing one or more of the 4 required courses of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Trade Theory or International Monetary Theory.

 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING

Students complete one course from the list below.
·         Statistical Methods for Business & Economics 
·         Econometrics (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
·         Applied Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Macro Econometrics (prerequisite Econometrics)
·         Risk Analysis and Modeling
·         Corporate Finance (prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics)
·         Quantitative Methods in International Relations (prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business & Economics)
 
Students may not double-count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice-versa. Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre-Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above.

 

CORE COURSES/EXAMS

All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and/or courses in addition to their concentration requirements. African Studies concentrators must pass Comparative National Systems as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester. If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester, a student must enroll in second core course.
·         American Foreign Policy Since World War II
·         Comparative National Systems
·         Evolution of the International Systems
·         Theories of International Relations

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

African Studies MA candidates a required to demonstrate proficiency in French, Portuguese or Arabic, through a course sequence and/or proficiency exam. Please consult the program for permission to use Swahili (not taught at SAIS). All non-native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering the school. Native speakers of French, Portuguese or Arabic must pass proficiency in a second language which can include English.

 

CAPSTONE

African Studies concentrators in the second year produce a program paper of publishable quality, which may be the product of a regular course or supervised independent research. The paper is due by April 15th of a student’s second year. For those whose final semester is fall, consult the Program Director for a due date.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR

Entering Class 2014-2015
Entering Class 2013-2014

 

Minor

African Studies Minor Requirements: (as of AY 15/16)

  • 3 courses from African Studies
  • 1 of the 3 courses must be from the following:
    ·         Political Economy of African Development (SA.780.648)
    ·         Contemporary African Politics (SA.780.724)
    ·         Politics of Foreign Aid in Africa (SA.780.727)
  • 2 additional African Studies or cross-listed courses

General Minor Requirements:

  • Minors are optional (like specializations)
  • A student can minor in only one area
  • A student cannot pursue a minor in International Economics or IR/General, but can pursue a Specialization in International Economics
  • Minors consist of three courses
  • Some minors will have a required course(s)
  • Some minors will have an “anchor” course or cross-listed course that counts toward both the concentration and the minor which reduces the three additional required courses to two, as the third will overlap both programs; in the IR or Asia concentrations, the course must be from the primary concentration area (Conflict Management, Global Theory and History, China, Japan, etc.) and not from the two additional required courses across the other IR or Asia areas
  • Regional minors may require language study or proficiency in the language of that region
  • A student can declare a minor at any time—prior to graduation
  • Students who are pursuing a minor in a program will not have bidding priority in that program (only concentrators)

To add or change a minor, please click HERE.

Events

The African Studies Program sponsors a weekly seminar series and annual conferences covering a wide range of topics on Africa.

For a detailed listing of our annual conferences connect to our conference page.

Past Events
2011-2012 Academic Year Events
2009-2010 Academic Year Events
2008-2009 Academic Year Events
2007-2008 Academic Year Events
2006-2007 Academic Year Events

2016
Jul
6
Film Presentation: Nowhere To Run
5:00pm - 7:00pm

The Johns Hopkins SAIS African Studies Program in partnership with American University will present the film: NOWHERE TO RUN: Nigeria's Climate and Environmental Crisis. The film informs and inspires as we seek to address one of the defining challenges of our time.

May
2
African Studies Program
12:30pm - 1:45pm

A discussion on “Congo’s Environmental Paradox: Potential and Predation in a Land of Plenty” Off-the-Record.

Apr
27
African Studies Program
12:30pm - 1:45pm

"Congo's Bungled Elections Preparation: Are Widespread Violence and Repression Still Avoidable, or Is it Already Too Late?" Tony Gambino was a Peace Corps Volunteer in the then-Zaire from 1979-1982. From 1983-1994, he volunteered for Amnesty International as a member of the Central Africa Co-Group. From 1987-1991, he served on the staff of the Select Committee on Hunger of the House of Representatives. In 1994, he joined the State Department, working in the office of the Under Secretary for Global Affairs, headed by former Senator Tim Wirth. From 1997 to 2001, Tony worked for USAID in Washington, as Congo Coordinator and then as Great Lakes Coordinator. From 2001-2004, he served in Kinshasa as the USAID Mission Director. He has written and spoken widely on the Congo, testifying in December 2011 on the last Congolese national election before the Subcommittee on African Affairs of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He presently teaches at Georgetown University and consults. He also serves on the Boards of Women for Women International and the Panzi Foundation USA. Off-the-Record.

Apr
13
African Studies Program
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Herbert Weiss, City University of New York, will speak on “Elections, Justice and Grievance Articulation in DR Congo.”  Off-the-Record.

Apr
8
Strategies for Economic Reconstruction in the Northern States of Nigeria
9:00am - 6:30pm

The nineteen northern states of Nigeria constitute about 73 percent of Nigerian territory and nearly 60 percent of its population. Numbering over 100 million, the UN predicts that, by 2050, the northern states will increase to 240 million, mostly youthful, residents. Comparatively, the northern states rank lower on all development indices because they face staggering challenges: rising population pressure, ecological degradation, widespread poverty, declining per capita incomes, fragile infrastructures, economic stagnation, and most importantly, accelerating levels of youth unemployment. These challenges mean the Nigerian nation cannot prosper unless all youths integrated into Nigeria’s prosperity. Continued regional polarization is neither a realistic nor secure option. Accordingly, the Conference’s goal is to solidarity join in with all of Nigeria’s communities who are mobilizing their financial, natural, organizational, and social resources to attract productive investments to absorb youths. The scale and complexity of the problems facing northern states mean no miraculous solution, no quick fix, is readily apparent. Instead, difficult policy decisions will have be made about allocation of scarce resources. Similarly, Conference participants realize that solutions will take decades and demand prodigious efforts from northern as well as from national and international communities. The participants share a common commitment to directly meet challenges by engaging in candid conversations about how to design realistic strategies to spearhead increased productivity and employment in the northern states . Ultimately, the Conference’s goal is to nurture sustainable and accountable public policies that will offer dignified livelihoods for northern youth. This event is the first of what the Conference organizers hope will be an ongoing series of conversations aimed is for promoting realistic strategies for boosting youth employment in northern states. To support these conversations, we will focus on three interrelated public policy issues

Apr
7
Strategies for Economic Reconstruction in the Northern States of Nigeria
9:00am - 5:30pm

The nineteen northern states of Nigeria constitute approximately 73 percent of Nigeria’s territory and nearly 60 percent of its population. Numbering over 100 million, the UN predicts that, by 2050, the northern states will increase to 240 million, mostly youthful, residents. Comparatively, the northern states rank lower on all development indices because they face staggering developmental challenges: rising population pressure, ecological degradation, widespread poverty, declining per capita incomes, fragile infrastructures, economic stagnation, and most importantly, accelerating levels of youth unemployment. These deficits mean the Nigerian nation cannot prosper unless all youths are integrated into Nigeria’s prosperity. Indeed tolerating regional polarization is neither a realistic nor secure option. The scale and complexity of the challenges facing the northern states mean no miraculous solutions, no quick fix, is realistic. Instead, difficult policy decisions will have to be made about the allocation of scarce resources. Conference participants also realize that realistic policy solutions will demand prodigious efforts from northern as well as from national and international communities. Yet, the participants share a deep commitment to directly confront these challenges by engaging in candid conversations about how to design realistic strategies to spearhead higher productivity and employment in the northern states. Ultimately, the Conference’s goal is to facilitate sustainable and accountable public and private policies that will begin to provide dignified livelihoods for northern youth. This event is the first of what the Conference organizers hope will be an ongoing series of conversations aimed at promoting realistic strategies for boosting youth employment in northern states. 

Mar
30
African Studies Lecture Series
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Professor Koen Vlassenroot will present a seminar for African Studies on“Negotiating Public Order: Armed Rebellion and Military Fragmentation in the eastern DRC.” 

Mar
30
African Studies Lecture Series
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Professor Koen Vlassenroot will present a seminar for African Studies on“Negotiating Public Order: Armed Rebellion and Military Fragmentation in the eastern DRC” 

Mar
18
ARCE Lecture
6:30pm - 8:30pm

Feb
19
Book Launch: "How Africa Works and Must Do Better"
2:00pm - 3:30pm

Dr. Jeffery Herbst, President and CEO, The Newseum; Dr. Greg Mills, Director Brenthurst Foundation, Johannesburg; and Ambassador Donald Gips, South Africa, 2009-2013 will speak on this topic. 

Feb
17
Explaining Joseph Kabila’s Reluctance to Leave Office
12:30pm - 1:30pm

The African Studies Program is sponsoring a series of expert seminars analyzing the tense  politics associated with the forthcoming elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). To launch this series, the Program is fortunate to host a pre-eminent authority on democracy in the DRC, Professor Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Professor Nzongola is the author of many books and numerous articles on African politics, development, and conflict issues.  These include: Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Africa, Nation-Building and State Building in Africa, and Le Mouvement Democratique au Zaire, 1956-1996. He is the editor of the Crisis in Zaire: Myths and Realities and of Conflict in the Horn of Africa, and co-editor of The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World.  Zongola’s most influential work, The Congo from Leopold to Kabila: A People’s History, won the coveted Best Book Award of the African Politics Conference Group (APCG) in 2004, an organization of political scientists specializing in Africa. Widely respected as a public intellectual, media personality as well as a scholar, Professor nZongola is a past president of the African Studies Association of America (ASA) and of the African Association of Political Science (AAPS).

Feb
12
Social Living in the Old Kingdom
6:00pm - 8:00pm

Leslie Anne Warden, Assistant Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Roanoke College, Dept. of Fine Arts will speak on this topic. 

Feb
10
Inequality, Citizenship and Spatial Dynamics in South African Cities: A Comparative Perspective with Brazil and India
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Patrick Heller is the Lyn Crost Professorship of Social Sciences at Brown University and Director of the Graduate Program in Development at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.  Professor Heller’s main area of research is the comparative study of social inequality, accountability, service deliverability, and democratic deepening in the burgeoning cities of South Africa, India and Brazil. He is the author of The Labor of Development: Workers in the Transformation of Capitalism in Kerala, India (Cornell 1999),  co-author of Social Democracy and the Global Periphery (Cambridge 2006), and co-author of  Bootstrapping Democracy: Transforming Local Governance and Civil Society in Brazil (Stanford 2011).  Heller’s methodology combines historical structural analysis, field work and the use of GIS mapping in order to assess how the transition to democracy has impacted the spatial transformation of the post-apartheid cities of South Africa. 

Feb
5
"Lived poverty declines in Africa: Is it better growth or better roads?"
1:00pm - 2:30pm

Dr. Robert Mattes, University of Cape Town; Dr. Boniface Dulani, University of Malawi; and Dr. E. Gyimah-Boadi, Center for Democratic Development, Ghana will speak on this topic. 

Jan
13
Trade Africa Plenary Meeting
9:00am - 2:00pm

2015
Dec
2
From Claimed Victories to a Long War: French Security Policy in the Sahel
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Dr. Roland Marchal, serior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research at Sciences-Po will speak on this topic.  

Nov
30
The Role of the IMF in Greece
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Senior Adjunct Professor in International Economics Jaime Marquez will discuss this topic.  

Nov
18
International-Assisted Elections: The Impact on Transitional Countries: Sierra Leone, Liberia, Burkina Faso and Congo
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Bado is an associate researcher at the Centre de Recherche et d’Action pour la Paix (CERAP) in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.  Prior to his time at the Wilson Center, Mr. Bado was a visiting researcher at Yale University during the 2014-2015 academic year. He is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science at Laval University in Canada. His doctoral research focuses on elections in post-civil conflict societies.

Nov
13
Josiah Wedgwood & 18th-Century Scholars: The Role Antiquity Played in Their Lives & Society
6:00pm - 8:00pm

Joseph Bothwell has an MA in Art History and is an Art Hisotrian and Art Appraiser. He has a wealth of art history expertise with the full scope of Western art history, which includes Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, and Contemporary art.  He also has experience in Asian art, including Chinese, Japanese, and Indian and Southeast Asian art, as well as education in pre-Columbian, Native American, and Primitive (African and Oceanic) art.

Nov
11
Can South Africa's Decline be Reversed?
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Jeff Herbst is an award winning political scientist whose incisive research focuses on state capacity, governance, and the challenge of development in Southern Africa.  After stepping down as President of Colgate University he recently became President and CEO of the Newseum. His most recent books are: How South Africa Works and Must Do Better and Africa’s Third Liberation: the New Search for Jobs and Prosperity.   In analyzing the current crisis in South Africa, Jeff will draw upon his practical experience acquired by institutionalizing entrepreneurship programs at Colgate University and his research into educational reforms that will increase opportunity for South African youth. 

Nov
9
CANCELED: How to Make Governement Work of Africa
12:15pm - 1:45pm

Nick Thompson, CEO of the African Governance Initiative will speak on this topic. 

Nov
4
Democracy and the Challenge of Political Change in Nigeria"
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Dr. Usman Bugaje is a public intellectual, former member of the House of Representatives and former National Secretary of the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN).  A civil society activist who founded the NGO, “Networks for Justice”, and a lecturer at Ahmadu Bello University, Dr. Bugage has written extensively on the role of women and youths in Nigeria’s recent democratic transformation.  Currently he is the convener of the Arewa Research and Development Project which promotes economic reform and reconstruction in the northern states of Nigeria.

 

Oct
21
Promoting 'Tolerant' Islam in Africa: Morocco's Recent Outreach Initiative
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Ann Wainscott is Assistant Professor of Political Science at St. Louis University.  She has conducted field work in Morocco and Senegal on the politics of promoting tolerance by state bureaucrats seeking to regulate religious groups and Islamic educational institutions.  Her forthcoming book, Bureaucratic Islam: Morocco’s response to the War on Terror, 2003-2015, analyzes the tensions associated with Morocco’s counter-terrorism strategy of incorporating religious institutions into the state while allowing religious political parties to compete in elections.  Professor Wainscott’s recent research evaluates the politics driving Morocco’s foreign policy strategy of promoting ts model to West African states with long standing historical ties to Morocco.

Oct
7
Africa: Why Economist Get It Wrong
4:30pm - 6:00pm

Morton Jerven teaches economic history at Simon Frazer University.  He specializes in unmasking the statistical evidence upon which international policy makers justify their influential policy prescriptions for African states.  His first book, Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do about It,  earned a “best book of the year” award from Foreign Affairs.  His latest book, Africa: Why Economists Get it Wrong  continues his original reasoning by explaining why sophisticated econometric techniques can never compensate for the distortions produced by false observations in the first instance.

Oct
5
How to Make Government Work of Africa
12:15pm - 1:45pm

Apr
21
Making Sense of China’s Rush into Africa
12:30pm - 2:00pm

Howard French, Columbia University, will discuss the topic.

Apr
10
Eternal Shelters
10:00pm - 12:00am

Aidan Dodson, senior research fellow, University of Bristol will discuss this topic. 

Mar
25
'Urbanization and Ethnicity in Botswana'
4:30pm - 6:00pm

Elliott Green, Associate Professor, London School of Economics, will discuss the topic.

Mar
20
"Predynastic Rock Art and the Mound of Creation: The Function of Boats in the Desert"
10:00pm - 12:00am

Lauren Lippiello, Research Associate, Egyptian Expedition, University of Arizona, will discuss the topic.

Mar
4
"How Education Reduces Political Participation under Electoral Authoritarianism: Evidence from Zimbabwe."
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Kevin Croke, SAIS Alum 2011, Harvard School of Public Health, will discuss the topic.

Feb
20
Ancient Egypt and Punt: An Archaeological Perspective from Mersa/Wadi Gawasis
11:00pm - 1:00am

Kathryn Bard, Professor, Boston University, will discuss the topic.

Feb
12
DR Congo Telema Democracy Protest The Road to the 2016 election
5:00pm - 7:00pm

In January 2015, the Congolese people took to the streets to protest legislation that conditioned the 2016 presidential election to a national census, effectively extending President Joseph Kabila’s term in office beyond the constitutionally-mandated two terms. The protests were violently repressed by the police and the republican guard. According to Human Rights Watch, 42 unarmed protesters were killed. After vigorous debate, the Senate amended the legislation and dropped the census clause. Tensions remain high, however, as the presidential majority seeks to stay in power and the national electoral commission continues to delay the publication of the electoral calendar. 

Jan
24
Imagining the Past: Historical Fiction in New Kingdom Egypt
12:00am - 2:00am

Colleen Mannassa, Associate Professor, Yale University, will discuss the topic.

2014
Dec
4
Emerging Africa: How the Global Economy's 'Last Frontier' Can Prosper and Matter
10:30pm - 12:00am

Kingsley Moghalu, deputy governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, will dicuss this topic.

Dec
3
Ebola: The Intersection of Cultural, Historical, and Political Dynamics in West Africa
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Michael McGovern, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, will discuss this topic.

Dec
1
Reframing South Africa Conference
3:00pm - 11:00pm

Various speakers will address new ways to think about South Africa in the regional and global economy, possibilities for industrial policy, innovation in social programs, and shifts in economic structure during the conference. South Africa's economic growth has slowed in recent years against a troubling background of deep structural inequalities that have persisted in the 20 years since democratization. The conference will address the question of how to construct a model of transformation that can secure the participation of all actors, including those that still feel disenfranchised, while getting the country back on the path to economic growth and stability.

Nov
17
Presidential Death and Elections: Comparing Contemporary Malawi and Zambia
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Boniface Dulani, lecturer in the Department of Political and Administrative Studies at the University of Malawi, and Kim Yi Dionne, assistant professor in the Department of Government at Smith College, will discuss this topic.

Nov
15
Hatshepsut: How a Woman Ascended the Throne of Ancient Egypt
12:00am - 2:00am

Kara Cooney, associate professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA, will discuss this topic.

Nov
5
Religious Engagement in Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Rachel Riedl, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Northwestern University, will discuss this topic.

Oct
29
Election Violence in Democratizing States: Africa in Comparative Perspective
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Leonardo Arriola, associate professor at the University of California-Berkeley, will discuss this topic.

Oct
29
Election Violence in Democratizing States: Africa in Comparative Perspective
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Election Violence in Democratizing States with focus on Africa.

Oct
28
What Did the US-Africa Summit Mean for the Great Lakes Region?
2:30pm - 4:00pm

David Gilmour, deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of African Affairs at the US Department of State; Mima Nedelcovych, president and CEO at the Initiative for Global Development; and Dave Peterson, senior director for the Africa Program at the National Endowment for Democracy, will discuss this topic. Mvemba Dizolele, Peter and Frances Duigan Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, will moderate the discussion. Note: This event is off the record.

Oct
24
Unwrapping Victorian-Era Egyptology: The Curious Case of the Web of the Occult and Scholarship
11:00pm - 1:00am

Steve Vinson, associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at Indiana University, will discuss this topic.

 

Oct
17
The Politics of Economic Growth and Social Inclusion in Africa: Day 2
2:00pm - 7:00pm

Various speakers will discuss this topic during the two day conference.

Oct
16
The Politics of Economic Growth and Social Inclusion in Africa: Day 1
2:00pm - 10:00pm

Various speakers will discuss this topic during the two day conference.

Oct
14
A Model for Wildlife Conservation in Africa: The Cheetah Conservation Fund
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Laurie Marker, founder and executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, and Bruce Brewer, general manager of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, will discuss this topic.

Oct
8
Loot, Pillage and Plunder: Prosecuting Economic War Crimes in the 21st Century
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Holly Dranginis, policy associate at the Enough Project; Mohamed Bangura, prosecution legal adviser and evidence officer for the Special Court for Sierra Leone; and James Stewart, assistant professor of law at the University of British Columbia, will discuss this topic.

Sep
26
Beneath the Sands of Egypt: An Archaeologist Explores the Valley Kings
11:00pm - 1:00am

Don Ryan, archaeologist and professor in the Division of Humanities at Pacific Lutheran University, will discuss this topic. 

Sep
25
Peace Land: Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Séverine Autesserre, assistant professor of political science at Columbia University, will discuss this topic.

Sep
24
The Role of Political Parties in an Emerging Democracy: A Nigerian Perspective
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Femi Gbaja Biamila, minority leader of the House of Representatives for the Republic of Nigeria, will discuss this topic.

Sep
18
Voices Unheard? Rising Demand for Democracy in Africa
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Carolyn Logan, deputy director of Afrobarometer and associate professor in the Department of Political Science and African Studies Center at Michigan State University, will discuss this topic. 

Sep
4
Ending Violence Against Women in the Great Lakes: Voices from the Front Line
2:30pm - 4:00pm

Mireille Muhigwa, Mandela Washington Fellow from Democratic Republic of Congo and gender program officer for SAMWAKI; Martine Theodora Kessy Ekomo-Soignet, Mandela Washington Fellow from the Central African Republic and project officer at the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF); and Nulu Naluyombya, Mandela Washington Fellow from Uganda and founder and executive Director of Success Chapter, will discuss this topic.

 

Jun
13
A Portrait of Egypt by 19th Century Artist: Drawn from an Orientalist Collection
11:30pm - 2:00am

Caroline Williams, independent scholar, will discuss this topic.

May
29
A Complex Partnership: What Declassified Documents Reveal About America's Role in the Congo from 1960-1968 and the Lessons We Can Draw Today
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Steve Weissman, historian, author, and independent political scientist; John Prados, senior fellow and project director at the National Security Archive at George Washington University; and Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, professor of african studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will discuss this topic.

May
16
Drinking and Knapping in Predynastic Egypt
11:30pm - 2:00am

Elizabeth Hart, fellow at the American Research Center in Egypt, will discuss this topic.

Apr
14
Constitution Amendment in an Emerging Democracy: The Nigerian Experience
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Ike Ekweremadu, Deputy President of the Senate of Nigeria, will discuss this topic.

Apr
11
Conviviality in Ancient Egypt
11:30pm - 2:00am

John Baines, professor of egyptology at the University of Oxford, will discuss this topic.

Apr
11
A Conversation with Usman Bugaje
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Usman Bugaje, founding chairman of Network for Justice, will give a talk.

Apr
3
Tunisia’s Transition: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Nacef Belkhiria, executive vice president of BSB Group Tunisia and member of the Tunisian American Friendship Association, will discuss this topic.

Apr
2
Betrayed: Politics, Power, and Prosperity
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Seth Kaplan, professorial lecturer in the African Studies Program, will discuss his new book Betrayed: Politics, Power, and Prosperity.

Mar
27
Youth in Burundi: Challenges and Opportunities in the Lead-up to the 2015 Elections
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Marc Sommers, visiting researcher at the African Studies Center at Boston University; Audace Machado, journalist for Voice of America; and Mike Jobbins, senior program manager for Africa at Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic.

Mar
21
Talking Trees in Ancient Egyptian Love Poetry
11:30pm - 2:00am

Cynthia Sheikholeslami, egyptologist, will discuss this topic.

Mar
5
Political Marginality in Nigeria: Exclusion, Dissent, and Election
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Adam Higazi, lecturer in African politics and history at the Centre of African Studies at the University of Cambridge, will discuss this topic.

Feb
22
Strangers in a Strange Land: Negotiating the Afterlife in Monumental Greek Tombs of Graeco-Roman Egypt
12:30am - 3:00am

Marjorie Venit, professor of ancient mediterranean art and archeology at the University of Maryland, will discuss this topic.

Feb
12
Rethinking State-Building in Muslim-Majority States: Grounded View From Somalia
6:30pm - 8:00pm

William Reno, professor of political science and program director for the Department of African Studies at Northwestern University, will discuss this topic.

Feb
7
Green Innovation in China: Examining the International Dimensions of China Clean Energy Technology Development
10:30pm - 12:00am

Joanna Lewis, assistant professor of science technology and international affairs at Georgetown University, will discuss topic. Note: This event is off the record.

Feb
5
Global Resource Governance: Complexities, Consumption & Comparative Politics in a Changing World
10:30pm - 12:00am

Stacy VanDeveer, professor of political science at the University of New Hampshire, will discuss this topic. Note: The speaker’s comments will be off the record.

Feb
4
Wind Power, Smart Grid and the Evolution of the U.S. Electricity System
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Elizabeth Wilson, associate professor of energy, environmental policy and law at the University of Minnesota, will discuss this topic.

Jan
30
International Consequences of the U.S. Oil and Gas Boom
10:30pm - 12:00am

Michael Levi, the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for Energy and Environment at the Council on Foreign Relations, will discuss this event.

Jan
28
The Political Macroeconomy of Resource Richness
10:30pm - 12:00am

Radeh Arezki, senior economist at the Research Department of the International Monetary Fund, will discuss this event.

Jan
24
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Passenger Vehicles: Evidence from Programs around the World
10:30pm - 12:00am

Antonio Bento, associate professor with the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University, will discuss this topic.

Jan
18
"Evil (?) Seth-God of Power and Might
12:30am - 3:00am

Eugene Cruz-Uribe, professor emeritus, in the department of History at Northern Arizona University, will discuss this topic.

2013
Dec
14
Unwrapping the Mummy: Hollywood Fantasies, Egyptian Realities
12:30am - 3:00am

Stuart Tyson Smith, professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, will discuss this topic.

Dec
4
Lived Poverty in Africa
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Robert Mattes, professor of political studies and director of the Democracy in Africa Research Unit at the University of Cape Town, will discuss this topic.

Nov
25
Everyday Religious Encounters and Gendered Identities in Southwest Nigeria
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Insa Nolte, senior lecturer in African studies at the University of Birmingham, will discuss this topic.

Nov
23
The Mysterious Meritefnut: A Missing Persons Case From the 7th Century B.C.
12:30am - 3:00am

Jeremy Pope, assistant professor in the College of William and Mary’s Department of History, will discuss this topic.

Nov
20
Inside South Africa’s Transition: Challenges of Post-Liberation Governance
10:30pm - 12:00am

Barry Gilder, director of operations at the Mapungubwe Institute, will discuss this topic.

Nov
18
I Am Here Until Development Comes: Displacement, Demolitions and Property Rights in Urbanizing Abuja
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Carl LeVan, assistant professor at the American University School of International Service, and Josiah Olubowale, a Ph.D. candidate in cultural studies at the University of the West Indies at St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, will discuss this topic.

Nov
7
The African Growth Story: The GE Perspective
4:00pm - 5:00pm

Todd Johnson, a risk and market development manager at General Electric Africa and a 2009 SAIS graduate, will discuss this topic.

Oct
31
The Limits of Institutional Reform in Development: New Ideas, Changing Approaches
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Matt Andrews, associate professor at Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for International Development, will discuss this topic.

Oct
23
A Coup in Bamako: How Mali’s Government Lost and Regained Political Legitimacy, 2012-13
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Bruce Whitehouse, assistant professor of anthropology at Lehigh University, will discuss this topic.

Oct
23
DATE CORRECTION, 10/23: Human Security and Security Sector Reform in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: New Research and Approaches
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Jocelyn Kelly, director of the Women in War Program for the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, and Lena Slachmuijlder, vice president of programs at Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is on Wednesday, October 23.

Oct
18
The Millionaire and the Mummies: Theodore Davis's Gilded Age in the Valley of the Kings
11:30pm - 2:00am

John Adams, Egyptophile and author of The Millionaire and the Mummies: Theodore Davis’s Gilded Age in the Valley of the Kings, will discuss his new book.

Oct
16
D.R. Congo: How the Kampala Talks and the Concentrations Nationales Undermine the Rule of Law and Fuel Instability
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Albert Moleka ’82, chief of staff to Etienne Tshisekedi, leader of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UDPS) political party and former prime minister of Zaire, will discuss this topic.

Oct
15
The Struggle for Freedom in Kenya
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Raila Odinga, former prime minister of Kenya, will discuss his newly published autobiography, Flame of Freedom.

Oct
3
Shrinking Democratic Space Ahead of the 2015 Elections: Re-engaging the International Community to Stabilize Burundi and the Region
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Frédéric Bamvuginyumvira, vice chairman of the Front for Democracy in Burundi FRODEBU and former vice president of the Republic of Burundi; Alice Nzomukunda, chairwoman of Alliance for Democratic Renewal and former second vice president of the Republic of Burundi; Marina Barampama, member of UPD and former second vice president of the Republic of Burundi; Alexis Sinduhije, chairman of MSD and founder of Radio Publique Africaine (African Public Radio), will discuss this topic.

Oct
2
Determinants of African Perceptions Toward Chinese and American Engagement in Africa: A Hierarchical Approach
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Kristie Inman, research adviser at the Center for Strategic Intelligence Research at the National Intelligence University, will discuss this topic.

Sep
27
Kenya at 50 - Day 2
2:00pm - 12:00am

On the second day of this two-day conference, academic experts will examine political, social, economic and cultural developments in Kenya since independence in 1963.

Sep
26
Kenya at 50 - Day 1
2:00pm - 11:30pm

John Lonsdale, a professor emeritus of African history and Trinity College fellow at the University of Cambridge, will give the keynote address at 9:15 a.m.on the first day of this two-day conference that will examine political, social, economic and cultural developments in Kenya since independence in 1963.

Sep
20
1777 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed
11:30pm - 2:00am

Eric Cline, professor of classics, anthropology and history at George Washington University, will discuss this topic.

Sep
18
The Challenges of Development and Democracy in Sierra Leone
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Due to unanticipated circumstances, this event has been cancelled. Ernest Bai Koroma, president of Sierra Leone, will discuss this topic. 

Sep
10
Regional Security Challenges and Nigeria’s Future
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Aminu Waziri Tambuwal, speaker of the House of Representatives of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, will discuss this topic.

Jun
21
Excavating the Lost Pyramid of Snefru: How the Seila Pyramid Is Reshaping Our Understanding of Pyramids in General
11:30pm - 2:00am

Kerry Muhlestein, a professor and associate chair of the Department of Ancient Scripture at Brigham Young University, will discuss this topic.

May
29
Intervention Force and Stabilization Plan in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Compatible or Counterproductive?
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Andrea Lari, director of programs at Refugees International, will discuss this topic.

May
17
Everything Is Forever Until It Is No More
11:00pm - 2:00am

Michael Jones, associate director at The American Research Center in Egypt, will discuss this topic.

May
9
What's Hot and What's Not in African Development
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Duncan Green, former head of research at Oxfam International, will discuss this topic.

May
2
Fraud and Vote Patterns in Kenya’s 2013 Election: Evidence From an Exit Poll
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Clark Gibson and James Long, professors in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego, will discuss this topic. 

Apr
26
Governing Lagos: Developing the Megacity
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Babatunde Fashola, governor of Lagos State in Nigeria, will discuss this topic.

Apr
24
Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do About It?
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Morten Jerven, assistant professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada, will discuss this topic. 

Apr
22
A New U.S. Policy Promoting Democratic Governance in the Congo
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Anthony Gambino, fellow at the Eastern Congo Initiative, and Stephen Weissman, fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, will discuss this topic. 

Apr
18
Making and Unmaking Nations: The Dynamics of Mass Violence and Genocide in Contemporary Africa
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Scott Straus, professor of political science and international studies at the University of Wisconsin, will discuss this topic. 

Apr
15
From the Framework Agreement to a ‘Peace Architecture’ in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: What is Needed?
2:30pm - 4:30pm

Cynthia Akuetteh, U.S. deputy assistant secretary for African Affairs at the U.S. Department of State; Severine Autesserre, assistant professor of political science at Barnard College and Columbia University; and Soraya Aziz Souleymane, winner of the “Miss Leader DRC” contest and community relations manager at BANRO Corporation, will discuss this topic. Note: SAIS will also host a live webcast available here at the time of the event. 

Apr
12
Governance and Security in the Sahelian States: From Crisis to Sustainable Recovery - Day 2
2:00pm - 6:00pm

Policymakers and experts will discuss issues of governance and development underlying the evolving security dilemmas in the Sahelian states on day 2 of a two-day conference. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://bit.ly/Y0gsNv. Members of the media should respond to Felisa Neuringer Klubes at the SAIS Communications Office at 202.663.5626 or fklubes@jhu.edu.
 

Apr
11
Governance and Security in the Sahelian States: From Crisis to Sustainable Recovery - Day 1
2:00pm - 9:00pm

Policymakers and experts will discuss issues of governance and development underlying the evolving security dilemmas in the Sahelian states. Leonardo Villalon, associate professor of political science and African studies at the University of Florida, will deliver keynote remarks at 9:15 a.m. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://bit.ly/Y0gsNv. Members of the media should respond to Felisa Neuringer Klubes at the SAIS Communications Office at 202.663.5626 or fklubes@jhu.edu.

Mar
28
Algeria Between Reforms and Stability
9:00pm - 10:30pm

Note: The location for the following event has been changed to Room 812, Rome Building, from the previously publicized location of Rome Building Auditorium.

I. William Zartman, SAIS professor emeritus, and Eammon Gearon, professional lecturer in the SAIS African Studies Program, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
27
Deficit in Social Trust: A Paradox in Ghana’s Democratic Development
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Richard Asante, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Northwestern University’s Program of African Studies, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
22
Mummies and Monies
11:30pm - 2:00am

Edward Bleiberg, curator of Egyptian classical and ancient Near Eastern art and managing curator of ancient Egyptian, African and Asian art at the Brooklyn Museum, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
13
Does Information Technology Flatten Interest Articulation? Evidence From Uganda
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Guy Grossman, assistant professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
12
The Role of the Governors in Nigeria’s Federal Democracy: Meeting the Challenges
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Theodore Ahamefule (T.A.) Orji, governor of the state of Abia in Nigeria, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
11
Understanding Who’s Who in Northern Mali: Terrorists, Secessionists and Criminals
9:30pm - 11:00pm

Rida Lyammouri, Africa analyst at the Navanti Group; Michael Shurkin, political scientist at the RAND Corporation; Larry Velte, associate professor at the National Defense University; and Eamonn Gearon (moderator), professorial lecturer in the SAIS African Studies Program, will discuss this topic. 

Mar
11
Political Prospects and Democratic Challenges in Nigeria
5:30pm - 7:00pm

Ike Nwachukwu, director general of the Nigerian Institute of International Affairs, will discuss this topic. 

Feb
26
Recent Developments in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Local, Regional and International Perspectives-Day 2
2:00pm - 6:30pm

Experts, policymakers and embassy representatives will discuss conflict at the local, national, regional and international level, and suggest solutions to improve the well-being of Congolese citizens at day 2 of this two-day conference. Note: The speakers’ comments will be not for attribution. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://www.sfcg.org/events/forums_great.html.

Feb
25
Recent Developments in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Local, Regional and International Perspectives-Day 1
2:30pm - 6:30pm

This event will be held at the Council on Foreign Relations at 1777 F St., NW. Experts, policymakers and embassy representatives will discuss conflict at the local, national, regional and international level, and suggest solutions to improve the well-being of Congolese citizens at day 1 of this two-day conference. Note: The speakers’ comments will be not for attribution. For a complete conference agenda, visit http://www.sfcg.org/events/forums_great.html.

Feb
21
Tunisia: Are Economic Decline and Political Violence Prevailing?
11:30pm - 1:30am

The location of this event has been changed to Rome Building Auditorium. Mustapha Kamel Nabli, former governor of the Central Bank of Tunisia and senior adviser to the World Bank chief economist; Emanuele Santi, principal country economist at Tunisia African Development Bank; Stephen McInerney, executive director of the Project on Middle East Democracy; Alexis Arieff, an analyst in African Affairs at Congressional Research Services; and Daniele Moro (moderator), visiting scholar in the SAIS African Studies Program, will discuss this topic. 

Feb
19
Looking Past Kenya’s Election: Ethnic and Institutional Challenges to Inclusive Development
10:30pm - 12:00am

Karuti Kanyinga, senior research fellow at the University of Nairobi’s Institute for Development Studies, and Mwangi Kimenyi, senior fellow and director of the Africa Growth Initiative at the Brookings Institution, will discuss this topic. 

Feb
16
A Demotic-Hieratic Fragment of the Book of Fayum
12:30am - 3:00am

Richard Jasnow, professor of Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss this topic. 

Feb
11
Is 2013 Africa’s Turn for the World Trade Organization Director General?
9:45pm

Alan Kyerematin, coordinator at the African Trade Policy Center of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and former Ghanaian trade minister, will discuss this topic. Note: This event is open to the SAIS community only.

Feb
6
Security Challenges in the Niger Delta: A Governor’s Approach
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Emmanuel Eweta Uduaghan, governor of Delta State in Nigeria, will discuss this topic.

Jan
24
Continued Crisis Eastern Congo: Perspectives on Recent Developments
3:30pm - 5:30pm

Leon Baroani, senior training advisor of the Democratic Republic of the Congo at Search for Common Ground, and Joshua Marks, senior program officer of Central and Southern African Programs at the National Endowment for Democracy, will discuss this topic. Note: The speakers’ comments will be off the record.

Jan
19
The Mysterious Death of Cleopatra
12:30am - 3:00am

Pat Brown, criminal profiler and founder and CEO of The Sexual Homicide Exchange and The Pat Brown Criminal Profiling Agency, will discuss this topic. Note: The speaker’s comments will be off the record.

Jan
14
Two Years Later: Assessing Tunisia’s Progress Since the Jasmine Revolution
11:30pm - 1:00am

Stephen McInerney, executive director of the Project on Middle East Democracy; Leila Chenoufi, senior environmental specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank; Samia Msadek, financial management regional director of East Asia and the Pacific at the World Bank; Eamonn Gearon, professorial lecturer in the SAIS African Studies Program; Mohamed Malouche (moderator), president of the Tunisian American Young Professionals; and Daniele Moro (introductory remarks), CTR visiting scholar, will discuss this topic. Habib Kazdaghli, dean of the University of Tunis-Manouba in Tunisia, will also deliver remarks via a pre-taped video message.

2012
Dec
15
Reading Hieroglyphs in Byzantine Egypt
12:30am - 3:00am

Jennifer Westfeldt, assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Louisville, will discuss this topic. Note: The speaker’s comments will be off the record.

Dec
7
ARCE
7:00pm - 10:00pm

Nov
17
Depiction of Humiliation of Prisoners of War During the New Kingdom
12:30am - 3:00am

Mark Janzen, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Memphis, will discuss this topic. Note: The speaker's comments will be off the record.

Nov
14
No title as of yet
1:30pm - 3:00pm

Oct
19
"Virtual Reality, Real Research"
7:00pm - 10:00pm

Oct
10
Private Investments in Africa: Recent trends, challenges & Opportunities
6:00pm - 9:00pm

Join us for a in depth discussion on the role of private investment in fostering economic development and prosperity in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The panel will be moderated by professor Leeds and will include Raja Jandhyala
(USAID Deputy Assistant Administrator for Africa and Chairperson of the Private Capital Group for Africa) Eric Kacou
(Co-Founder of ESPartners and Author of “Entrepreneurial Solutions for Prosperity”)

Our Alumni

 

Alumni of the African Studies Program can be found across the African continent and around the world, in government, private, academic, and non-governmental sectors. Among the professional opportunities for our graduates:

o African Capacity Building Foundation, Harare, Zimbabwe
o African Development Bank, Tunis
o African Risk Capacity (ARC), Johannesburg
o African Union
o Albright Stonebridge Group
o AT Kearney
o British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), Kinshasa, Congo
o The Brookings Institution
o Catholic Relief Services
o Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC
o Chevron
o Control Risks Group LLC
o Corporate Council on Africa, Washington DC
o Department for International Development (DFID), UK
o Economic Development Institute, World Bank
o The Enough Project
o The Eurasia Group
o Foreign Ministry of Tanzania
o Foreign & Commonwealth Office, U.K.
o Freeport McMoRan
o Frontier Strategy Group
o General Electric
o Harvard School of Public Health
o IHS/PFC Energy
o Institute for Security Studies, Johannesburg
o International Business Initiatives
o International Finance Corporation
o International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
o International Republican Institute, Washington, DC
o Jeune Afrique
o JP Morgan
o Lagos State Government
o Louis Berger
o Mitchell Madison Group, New York
o McKinsey & Company
o National Assembly of Nigeria
o National Democratic Institute, Washington DC
o National Endowment for Democracy
o Roland Berger
o South African Reserve Bank
o United Nations Development Program
o United Nations Peacekeeping Operations
o USAID, Washington DC
o US Congress
o US Department of Commerce
o US Department of Justice
o US Department of State
o US, Department of the Treasury
o US Trade Representative
o World Economic Forum
o The Whitaker Group
o The World Bank

Research

 
 
 

External Resources

 

News and General Information

Africa South of the Sahara (Stanford University)
Comprehensive list of Africa-related links

AllAfrica.com
Compilation of news sources from across the continent

BBC News/Africa

Inter Press Service - Africa

Thomson Reuters Foundation

United Nations, Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)
News and analysis on areas of conflict
 

 

Research and Data

ACLED (Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project)

African Power and Politics

Afrobarometer Home Page

Survey research site, extensive analysis of politics and reform

Center for Global Development
Research and policy analysis, special focus on aid and reform

Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity (CRISE)
Oxford University 

Centre for the Study of African Economies, Oxford University
A leading source for economic research in the region

Council on Foreign Relations

Effective States and Inclusive Development
Consortium based at University of Manchester

Innovations for Successful Societies
Princeton University

International Food Policy Research Institute

University of Cape Town-Centre for Social Science Research
Inequality, poverty, HIV/AIDS and public attitudes

University of Sussex- Institute of Development Studies. (Brighton, U.K.)

United States Institute of Peace

The World Bank
Data, economic policy analysis, perspectives on governance

Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem)
University of Gothenburg and Kellogg Institute
 

 

African Studies Centers and Organizations

African Politics Conference Group

African Studies Association Home Page

The central African studies organization in the U.S.

African Studies Center, Leiden, Netherlands

Institute for African Development (IAD), Cornell University

Michigan State University, African Studies Center

Northwestern University Program of African Studies

Nordiska Afrikainstitutet/Nordic Africa Institute

Royal African Society
Leading institute on African affairs in the UK

University of California, Berkeley, Center for African Studies

UCLA, African Studies

University of Florida, African Studies Program

University of Wisconsin, African Studies Program

WomenAlsoKnowStuff : African Politics
List of scholars and areas of specialization

 

 

Policy and Advocacy

Africa Center, Atlantic Council

Africa Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies 


Africare 

The Enough Project, the project to end genocide and crimes against humanity

Ghana Center for Democratic Development 

Global Financial Integrity 

Global Voices Online


Human Rights Watch - Africa

Institute for Policy Studies

International Crisis Group
Authoritative analysis and advocacy on conflict

Mo Ibrahim Foundation 

Natural Resources Governance Institute

Network of African Democracy Research Institutes


ONE Campaign

OXFAM
Focus on sustainable development

The South African Civil Society Information Service 

Tony Blair Africa Governance Initiative 

Transparency International

 

African Studies Resources by Region and Country

Central Africa

Southern Africa

East Africa/ Horn of Africa

Indian Ocean

West Africa

Contact Us


Paul Lubeck
Acting Director of the African Studies Program
plubeck1@jhu.edu
202-349-0981
Bernstein-Offit 715


Administrative Coordinator
202.663.5676
Bernstein-Offit 716

Address & Phone

African Studies
Bernstein-Offit Building
1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC
20036

202.663.5676